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Summer 2022: Coronavirus Information

2021 Summer Course Archive

AAAS S-110
Africana Philosophy

Teodros Kiros, PhD

Associate of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University and Professor, Liberal Arts, Berklee College of Music

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34824

Description
This course examines Africana philosophy as a field of study practiced by professional philosophers of African Descent and non-African philosophers. The course focuses on fundamental dimensions of Africana philosophy: history, method, logic, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, religion, and politics. Particular attention is given to three questions: is there an African philosophy or simply philosophy in Africa? What is the relationship between African philosophy and questions of modernity and tradition? How do issues of diversity and identity inform the nature of African philosophy? These questions are examined in a classroom environment mediated by dialogue, debates, and class presentations.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34824/2021

AAAS S-118
Race, Class, and Consumption in Food

Carla D. Martin, PhD

Lecturer on African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35142

Description
Today, a heavy burden is placed on consumers to understand the social justice (or lack thereof) of the products that they purchase. Food and nutrition, primary and recurrent needs of all human beings, also become deeply entrenched in social meaning making. Our intimate experiences of food as something we consume in our bodies create social niches in which the consumption of luxury items by connoisseurs allows for claims of superior status, taste, and ethics. This course examines the intersection of race, class, and consumption in historical and contemporary food politics. Together, we analyze the interplay of food and labor, taste and power, race and consumption, community and capitalism, luxury and inequality, food sovereignty and celebrity, and responsibility and repair. We explore elements of the mundane—the morning pastry, the bottle of water, or the spices forgotten in our cabinets—all items that not only play a role in the movement of billions of dollars around the world, but also in the access to fundamental rights and equity in the lives of all people. Interdisciplinary course readings weave together threads of profound historical and contemporary debates on race, class, and consumption. Assignments address pressing real-world questions related to food justice, labor politics, and social inequality, drawing from our individual and collective experiences.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35142/2021

AAAS S-125
Readings in Black Radicalism

Walter Johnson, PhD

Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34164

Description
This course introduces students to some of the key texts and ideas in the history of Black radical thought since the nineteenth century. Key topics include Black anti-slavery and anti-imperialism; Black Marxism; Black feminism; intersectionality; and reparations.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34164/2021

AAAS S-131
How Did We Get Here? From Slavery to #MeToo

Linda Chavers, PhD

Lecturer on African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35096

Description
Would you understand the #MeToo era better if you had read Harriet Jacobs’s 1861 autobiography, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl? What are we laughing at when Saturday Night Live‘s Leslie Jones jokes that she would be the most useful woman in antebellum America? This interdisciplinary course explores how resistance strategies of Black women from and after the time of slavery can be applied to our current moment. It takes popular tropes from our contemporary language and connects them to marginalized texts from centuries ago to critically examine discourses of identity, power, racism, and law. Students leave this course with a more informed understanding of American slavery as it relates to our current world.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. This course counts for the Histories, Societies, and Individuals Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1041. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35096/2021

AAAS S-196Y
African Literature and the Poetics of Memory

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35117

Description
Literary representations of memory and trauma in African postcolonial and contemporary literature are the main focus of this course. In order to understand how trauma has an impact on the relationship of individuals to their physical and spiritual world, and how in a very unique way characters cope with their traumatic reality, we analyze structural disorder and historical event narratives, including novels and testimony by Aminata Forna, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Boubacar Boris Diop, Zakes Mda, Namwali Serpell, and Jennifer Makumbi. Our examination of these texts is supplemented by theory in trauma studies, anthropology, comparative literary studies, religious studies, psychoanalysis, and the various subcategories that include the study of memory and forgiveness, retrospective narrative, testimony and bearing witness, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mourning, anthropology of war and violence, and transgenerational trauma, as well as healing and working through trauma.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35117/2021

ANTH S-1020
Ethnography, Fieldwork, and Cultural Documentation: An Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35060

Description
This course introduces students to the study of cultural traditions, beliefs, and artistic expressions—their performance, collection, representation, and interpretation—through the practice of ethnography. At once an introduction to qualitative research methods and ethics, a crash course in collaborative ethnography, and a practicum in cultural documentation, this course weds scholarly inquiry and academic study to experiential learning and community engagement with local tradition bearers and folk communities. Guided by wide and interdisciplinary collection of texts, students have the opportunity to study expressive culture from the ground up, not only through an academic lens, but through personal relationships, cultural participation, and inquisitive explorations of folk groups. Throughout the course, students are invited to develop skills in qualitative research, cultural documentation, proposal design, interviewing, and the arts of interpretation as they try their hand at fieldwork and ethnography. By examining folkways, expressive culture, traditions, and performances, and interrogating their import in the daily lives of individual and groups, we aim to bridge the divide between grand theories and everyday practices, between intellectual debates and lived experiences, between the academic institution and the vernacular world. Ultimately, this course aims to bring the folk themselves into the center of the academic study, discussion, and debate, and it aims to give students the tools to help amplify and illuminate their voices, traditions, practices, and lore.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

ANTH S-1150
Can We Know Our Past?

Jason A. Ur, PhD

Stephen Phillips Professor of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35055

Description
What happened in the past, and if and how we should remember it, is hotly contested. What is our degree of certainty about the past societies and cultures that historians, archaeologists, and others study today? Whose past matters? And how should we remember it? Most of the human past happened in prehistory. This course emphasizes material remains, which are studied primarily by the tools of archaeology. We start with basic questions such as: what is left of the past? How do we find these remains, and how can we know how old they are? Students explore how the past is created in, and sometimes for, the present; how history and archaeology have been used to advance imperial and colonial agendas; and how nations have used the same tools to create their own postcolonial identities. Course readings present a general background, while synchronous meetings present case studies. Students interact with 3D artifacts, web maps, experiments, and other digital methods. After completing this course, students recognize claims made about the past and toward what ends, are able to assess their validity, and understand why the past matters today and for the future.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for either the Histories, Societies, Individuals Gen Ed requirement or the Science and Technology in Society Gen Ed requirement (but not both), and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1105. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 150 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35055/2021

ANTH S-1300
Summer Seminar: Human Evolution

Amy E. Clark, PhD

College Fellow in Anthropology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34204

Description
How do we know how humans evolved? This seminar investigates the evidence and methods used to reconstruct human evolution. We review eight million years of evolutionary history, focusing on the origins of defining features of our species such as bipedalism, tool use, language, art, and agriculture. We evaluate interpretations of the past using different lines of evidence, including genetic and fossil data, the archaeological and ethnographic records, and comparisons with living primates.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. See the Summer Seminars page for more information on this class.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34204/2021

ANTH S-1410
The Storyteller in Flight: Migrant Narratives, Refugee Camp Cultures, and the Arts of Displacement

Lowell A. Brower, PhD

Lecturer on Folklore and Mythology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35053

Description
What are the effects of displacement on tradition, storytelling, and cultural belonging? How does forced migration influence narration, creative expression, and imagination? What are the powers and potentials of artistic communication after existential rupture? What is the role of the storyteller in flight? This course explores expressive cultures in motion, amid crisis, and out of place, and asks how tradition bearers and creative innovators adapt when the communities in which their preexisting cultural practices had once flourished are destroyed, uprooted, transformed, or dispersed. It also asks how researchers, aid workers, activists, and other outsiders might engage in ethical and beneficial ways with individuals and communities in exile. In examining the impacts of forced migration on cultural production, transmission, and innovation, we put classical theories of refugee and migration studies in conversation with recent ethnographies and folklore collections, as well as memoirs, novels, songs, and films by and about displaced persons. With case studies ranging from colonial Africa, to post-war Europe, to contemporary America, we explore what, if anything, holds together the refugee experience, while also interrogating our own neighborly obligations and scholarly commitments as we navigate what has famously been deemed the century of the migrant.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35053/2021

ANTH S-1600
Introduction to Social Anthropology

Theodore Macdonald, Jr., PhD

Lecturer on Social Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31819

Description
The course explores anthropological approaches to society, culture, history, and current events. Themes include social organization, ideology, religion, exchange, subsistence, gender, land use, ethnicity, ethnic conflict, and local/global interrelations. Students explore these themes through detailed studies of women in North Africa, ethnicity in Bosnia, ritual exchange in the South Pacific, and political organization in Southeast Asia. The instructor also reviews his current applied research on contemporary indigenous responses to political, economic, and ecological changes in Latin America, with special emphasis on the Amazon Basin. Students grapple with the intellectual and ethical challenges, both past and present, of anthropologists.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections for graduate-credit students, optional sections for undergraduate-credit students to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31819/2021

ANTH S-1662
The Human Market: The Global Traffic in Human Beings

Keridwen N. Luis, PhD

Lecturer in Anthropology and in the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, Brandeis University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33520

Description
The course introduces students to the wide range of cultural and ethical questions surrounding the trade in humans. We consider issues ranging from the traffic in women and children to the trade in human organs. We especially explore the cultural, racial, class, and gender issues inherent in transactions in human beings and their flesh. Who is selling their organs on the international market and why? Whose babies go to whom in international adoption, and who decides what the best interests of the children are? Whose bones are sold to museums and medical schools, and what do such transactions mean?

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33520/2021

APMA S-115
Mathematical Modeling

Zhiming Kuang, PhD

Gordon McKay Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33607

Description
Mathematical models are ubiquitous, providing a quantitative framework for understanding, prediction, and decision making in nearly every aspect of life, ranging from the timing of traffic lights, to the control of the spread of disease, resource management, and sports. They also play a fundamental role in all natural sciences and increasingly in the social sciences as well. This course provides an introduction to modeling through in-depth discussions of a series of examples, and hands-on exercises and projects that make use of a range of continuous and discrete mathematical tools.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: MATH S-21a and MATH S-21b or permission of instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33607/2021

ARAB S-AA
Elementary Arabic

Muhammad A. Habib, PhD

Preceptor in Arabic, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35121 | Section 1

Description
Designed for students who have not previously studied Arabic, this course introduces the script, sounds, and basic grammar of the language. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency in all four skills (reading, speaking, listening, and writing), as well as an understanding and appreciation of Arabic culture.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35121/2021

ARAB S-AA
Elementary Arabic

Muhammad A. Habib, PhD

Preceptor in Arabic, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35201 | Section 2

Description
Designed for students who have not previously studied Arabic, this course introduces the script, sounds, and basic grammar of the language. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency in all four skills (reading, speaking, listening, and writing), as well as an understanding and appreciation of Arabic culture.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35201/2021

ARAB S-BA
Intermediate Modern Arabic I

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34892

Description
Conducted in Arabic (except in special circumstances), this course further develops skills in reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Arabic. Through participation in class, homework, and other activities, students become more proficient in Arabic and reach an intermediate level. The course takes an interactive approach, incorporating group work, individual exercises, presentations, and class discussions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ARAB E-2 or two semesters of elementary Arabic.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34892/2021

ASTR S-30
A Short Tour of the Universe Guided by Einstein and Others

Arvind Borde, PhD

Senior Professor of Mathematics and Physics, Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33190

Description
This course discusses what we understand of the universe, guided by those who have shaped our understanding. Each week, we use as a springboard one or more key papers by Einstein, Penrose, Hawking, Guth, and others, and discuss the main ideas in them. All the background information needed to understand these ideas is provided in detail.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry. An introductory physics course would be helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33190/2021

ASTR S-35
Fundamentals of Contemporary Astronomy: Frontiers of Current Research

Rosanne Di Stefano, PhD

Senior Astrophysicist, Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31194

Description
Astronomers are making exciting discoveries every day. Some of these discoveries change the way we understand the universe. During the past twenty-five years, we have discovered roughly 4,000 exoplanets, or planets orbiting other stars. Just over twenty years ago, the systematic study of supernovae explosions led to the discovery of a new and still not understood component of the universe called dark energy. In 2016, gravitational radiation was detected for the first time, allowing us to detect the mergers of distant black holes. In this course we select five areas of current research and use these to introduce and study the basic concepts of astronomy. The course is designed to help students get a feel for what it is like to be an astronomer, using the new generation of ground- and space-based telescopes, combined with sophisticated theoretical techniques and computational facilities. As we study each aspect of the universe, we ask how we came to know what we know today and how astronomers are investigating still-unanswered questions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: High school algebra; some physics background is useful but not necessary.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31194/2021

ASTR S-41
The Life and Death of Stars

Wanda L. Diaz-Merced, PhD

Scientist, European Gravitational Observatory

Allyson Bieryla

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35166

Description
For most of its existence, humanity looked at the night sky and wondered about the stars and what they were, but had no way of finding the answer. In roughly the last century, astronomers have developed various techniques to discover what the stars are and how their lives unfold from birth to death. This course examines the life cycle of stars, from their formation in a nebula to their death when they run out of fuel, which can sometimes end in the biggest explosions known in the universe, a supernova. We also cover what stars leave behind after their deaths, such as neutron stars and black holes, and how stellar life and death is responsible for all chemical elements on the periodic table, including those that make us. We focus on our own star, the sun, and learn how Harvard astronomers have been at the forefront of understanding the life cycle of stars through the present day.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry. An introductory physics course would be helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35166/2021

ASTR S-60
Space Exploration: Law, Policy, and Ethics

Alissa J. Haddaji, PhD

Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34841

Description
This course, intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with a background in either astronomy, law, or policy, introduces students to the practice of space law and policy in the United States and internationally, and invites them to explore the ethical implications of space exploration. This discussion-based course begins with an exploration of the basics of the field, including its founding texts and managing structures. Students practice critical reading through the exploration of all three levels of space governance (national, international, and entrepreneurial), addressing ongoing debates challenging the space sector, including space debris, space traffic management, satellite constellations, space security, the US Space Force, planetary protection, planetary defense, and space resource utilization.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Prerequisites: Completion of college-level courses in law, policy, or space sciences.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

ASTR S-80
Planets, Moons and Their Stars: the Search for Life in the Cosmos

Alessandro Massarotti, PhD

Associate Professor of Physics, Stonehill College and Associate of the Department of Astronomy, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34550

Description
Astrobiology is a new discipline born out of the convergence of all scientific inquiry currently under way on the question of the origin and development of life here on Earth, and potentially elsewhere in the universe. Recent advances in planetary exploration, astronomy, geochemistry, and biochemistry are leading to a revolution in our ideas on the emergence of life on our own planet and the likelihood of finding life outside the Earth. In particular, much is being learned about Mars and Venus because of the many recent and ongoing space missions. Spectacular data from Jupiter’s and Saturn’s moons, like Titan, Europa, and Enceladus, show that these moons may become possible targets of future searches for life. Geochemists are finding more and more intriguing clues about the Earth’s past by analyzing rocks dating from the very first period after the Earth’s formation, thus providing a fundamentally new context for research on the transition between chemistry and primordial life. And the search for extra-solar planets is leading to the discovery of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. In this course, students are introduced to current and planned telescopic space missions aimed at finding and characterizing exoplanets and robotic missions, such as the Mars rovers. The course also covers current ideas about the role of stars and their evolution in the habitability of planets and in the chemistry of galaxies.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34550/2021

BIOS S-1A
Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology

Aditi Hazra, PhD

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33926

Description
This course explores the central principles of molecular and cellular biology, with a focus on structure function relationships, energy, metabolism, and genetics/genomics. The emphasis is on cells as systems for the capture and transformation of energy, the processing of molecular information, the relationship between form and function, and genomic diversity. Laboratory and discussion sections allow students to reinforce concepts covered in lecture. BIOS S-1a is part of an introductory biology series (BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b) that fulfills the medical school admission requirement of two semesters of biology. (Note: BIOS S-1a is not a prerequisite for BIOS S-1b. Students are welcome to take BIOS S-1b before BIOS S-1a.)

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required labs Thursdays, 1-4 pm and required sections Tuesdays, 1-2 pm.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: High school mathematics, chemistry, and biology. College-level chemistry is preferred and strongly recommended. Students are strongly advised to complete the General Chemistry Diagnostic, available on the course website in the spring. The diagnostic is intended to help students decide if they have the chemistry background required for success in the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 90 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33926/2021

BIOS S-1B
Introduction to Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Casey J. Roehrig, PhD

Senior Project Lead, HarvardX

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33927

Description
This course covers anatomy and physiology, as well as the origin of life and principles of evolution. Laboratory sections scheduled throughout the series allow students to reinforce concepts covered in lecture. BIOS S-1b is part of an introductory biology series (BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b) that fulfills the medical school admission requirement of two semesters of biology.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections Mondays, 1-2:30 pm and other times to be arranged. Required labs Wednesdays, 1-4 pm and other times to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: High school biology, chemistry, and algebra. BIOS S-1a is not a prerequisite for BIOS S-1b. You may choose to take BIOS S-1b first, or concurrently with BIOS S-1a.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 120 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33927/2021

BIOS S-10
Introduction to Biochemistry

Alain Viel, PhD

Senior Lecturer on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32376

Description
This course is an integrated introduction to the structure of macromolecules and a biochemical approach to protein function. The organization of macromolecules is addressed through a discussion of their hierarchical structure and a study of their assembly into complexes responsible for specific biological processes. Topics addressing protein function include enzyme kinetics, the characterization of major metabolic pathways, and their interconnection into tightly regulated networks. Current laboratory techniques are discussed during lecture and examples showing the organization of protein networks and disease-linked protein profiles are drawn from proteomic studies. The laboratory portion of the course exposes students to a broad range of experimental approaches, including affinity purification, enzyme kinetics, analysis of protein folding, and stability. The laboratory exercises are designed to give students a direct experience of research conducted in a modern laboratory.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 80 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32376/2021

BIOS S-12
Principles and Techniques of Molecular Biology

Alain Viel, PhD

Senior Lecturer on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32378

Description
The course addresses both the fundamental principles and techniques of molecular biology. Students gain an in-depth knowledge of nucleic acid structure, molecular genetics, and the biochemistry of transcription and protein synthesis. Other topics include how mechanisms of gene regulation play a role in retroviral pathogenesis, embryonic development, and the generation of immune diversity. Each lecture directly relates molecular biology to current laboratory techniques. The laboratory portion of the course represents a complete experimental project. A combination of experiments gives students a broad exposure to several important techniques in molecular biology, together with the direct experience of an intensive research project. Experiments include current approaches to mutation analysis, protein interaction assays, and recombinant cDNA cloning by PCR.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32378/2021

BIOS S-14
Principles of Genetics

Steven Theroux, PhD

Professor of Biology, Assumption University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32374

Description
This course focuses on transmission and molecular genetics. Topics include chromosome structure and replication, genetic linkage and mapping, regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, epigenetics, genetic mutation, genetics of cancer, and the principles of genetic engineering. The course makes use of bioinformatics to explore gene function, and pertinent applications of bioinformatics and genetics to modern biological problems are discussed.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32374/2021

BIOS S-26
Species-Spanning Medicine: The Nature of Illness in Humans and Other Animals

Barbara Natterson Horowitz, MD

Lecturer on Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Visiting Professor in Human and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35083

Description
Heart attacks, breast cancer, obesity, anxiety, compulsive disorders, eating issues, and self-injury can be found across the animal kingdom. Human exceptionalism has been so entrenched in modern medicine that it has obscured many crucial health connections across species. This course presents species-spanning medicine as a new perspective for understanding the nature of disease; how evolutionary processes have shaped human vulnerability to illness; and how anthropocentric traditions have contributed to stigma associated with mental illness, cancer, obesity, and other disorders. Taught by a physician, this course uses a mini-medical school approach to introduce relevant medical information and formal methods of systematic review, meta-analysis, and phylogenetic modeling as an evolutionary framework. No prior medical or advanced scientific knowledge is assumed. Both physical and mental illnesses are covered.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35083/2021

BIOS S-50
Foundations of Neuroscience

Ryan W. Draft, PhD

Lecturer on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34198

Description
This course is an introduction to the organization and function of the nervous system. Topics to be covered include cell biology of neurons, neurotransmitters, electrical signaling, sensory and motor systems, developmental neurobiology, simple circuits, learning, and behavior. We also discuss the molecular basis of neurodegenerative disease and mental illness.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged. Optional review sessions Wednesdays, 4:30-6 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Prerequisites: A college-level introductory biology course or a strong background in biology is recommended for students to be successful in this class.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 200 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34198/2021

BIOS S-61
Introduction to Immunology Amid a Pandemic

Angela Bair Schmider, PhD

Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34508

Description
Immunology is the study of the immune system, the body’s built-in defense system. This course covers an integrated introduction to immunology and techniques used in research and diagnostic laboratories. It uses the pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 as the primary model to help students understand the virus, how the body fights it, and how researchers are using immunology-based techniques to learn more about the virus and treat the disease it causes. Lectures explore introductory concepts in virology and how they connect to the immune system with an emphasis on the coronavirus. This course introduces and demonstrates, by video and conversation, laboratory approaches that illustrate concepts of how the immune system works.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: An introductory college biology course, AP biology, or permission from the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 54 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34508/2021

BIOS S-62
Infectious Diseases, Pandemics, and Social Injustice

Don Goldmann, MD

Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35048

Description
Amazing scientific and public health advances have transformed our understanding, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases—discoveries so profound that they were unimaginable even a generation ago. Yet the global burden of infections remains prodigious, disproportionately affecting low income countries and vulnerable populations. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare these stark inequities. This highly interactive and collaborative course prepares students to understand and mitigate the impact of infectious diseases and pandemics through study of major infections, including COVID-19, cholera, malaria, tuberculosis, syphilis, smallpox, polio, and plague. We provide sufficient clinical, biological, and epidemiological background for students to understand why these infections have had such dramatic effects and how they can be controlled. Rather than merely reciting grim statistics and body counts, we illustrate their impact through the lenses of history, literature, film, and drama. We celebrate how these infections have stimulated revolutionary scientific advances, but also explore the darker side of the story. Advances in prevention and treatment have left large segments of the global population behind. Under the veneer of stunning progress lie the realities of stigmatization, bias, exclusion, shameful human experimentation, and social injustice.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Science and Technology in Society Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1129. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 72 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35048/2021

BIOS S-74
Marine Life and Ecosystems of the Sea

Collin H. Johnson, PhD

Preceptor in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32373

Description
This course explores the life history and adaptations of marine life and the ecosystems of the sea. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fragility and resilience of marine systems in the face of anthropogenically driven perturbations such as habitat fragmentation, elevated sea surface temperature, alien species, nonsustainable fishing practices, and increased global tourism.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional laboratory discussion meetings Wednesdays, time to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: One year of secondary school biology.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32373/2021

BIOS S-150
The Biology of Cancer

Steven Theroux, PhD

Professor of Biology, Assumption University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33128

Description
This course explores the biology of cancer. We begin by examining the personal, social, and economic consequences of this disease, and then we focus on the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, we study the nature of cancer, the role of viruses in cancer, cellular oncogenes, cellular signaling mechanisms, tumor suppressor genes, and the maintenance of genomic integrity. We also examine the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, cellular immortalization, tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Finally, we examine how modern molecular medicine is being used to treat cancer.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent, plus an additional college-level biology course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33128/2021

BIOS S-200
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Biology

Mihaela G. Gadjeva, PhD

Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32752

Description
This proseminar is designed to teach students many of the writing and analytical skills that are required to succeed in graduate-level courses in the biological sciences. Through critical reading and presentation of research articles, students learn how to form questions that can be addressed experimentally and how to write a corresponding, testable hypothesis. The course also addresses the process of experimental design and current experimental methodologies in biology. Students are given multiple opportunities to hone their writing skills on several short writing assignments. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, present a paper to the class, and write a final research proposal due at the end of the semester. We focus our attention on the molecular mechanisms of innate immune responses to pathogens. Some prior knowledge of immunology is beneficial but not required. Students learn to think scientifically while they gain knowledge of basic mechanisms of immune protection against bacterial pathogens. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course; molecular biology (BIOS S-12 or the equivalent) and EXPO S-42c are highly recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32752/2021

BIOS S-208
Precision Medicine in Genomics

Arezou Ghazani, PhD

Director of Clinical Genomics, Brigham Genomic Medicine and Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35154

Description
This course focuses on the application of genomic science in precision medicine. It explores the path from big data to precision medicine by discussing the utility of novel approaches, methods, and systems in genomic science. Topics include technologies and platforms in genomics, analysis of large-scale data, methods for the interpretation of genomic alterations, data collection and privacy, data ownership, issues for data science applications, and clinical application of data in focused patient care.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-14 or BIOS E-45 or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35154/2021

BIOT S-150
Medical Genomics and Genetics

Yitzhak Pilpel, PhD

Professor of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35148

Description
The study of genomes is changing the understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of life. As such, it profoundly affects our understanding of human health and provides a new, sophisticated means to change the practice of medicine in the future. The aim of the course is to educate students and biomedical professionals about the new horizons of medical genomics and genetics. The course combines basic and applied aspects of the field. Main topics covered include basics of genetics and genomics, cancer biology, viruses and pandemics, the microbiome and the human body, drug design, and personalized medicine.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-14 or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35148/2021

BIOT S-200
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Biotechnology and Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Elizabeth Wiltrout Leary, PhD

Graduate Program Manager, Tufts Medical Center

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32666

Description
In this proseminar, we focus on science writing, data interpretation, and collaborative and independent experimental design. Students who successfully complete the course are those who demonstrate an ability to assess information from the primary scientific literature, a command of oral and written communication skills, and the ability to generate a logical progression of experiments to help validate or nullify their hypothesis. Reading materials include publications on scientific writing and experimental design. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: The instructor assumes that students already have undergraduate degrees in an area of life, physical, or computer science, as well as professional scientific training. Scientists coming from a physical or computer science background should successfully complete BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, and BIOS S-12, or their equivalents, before attempting to take BIOT S-200. EXPO S-42c is strongly recommended. Students must earn a satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32666/2021

CELT S-132
An Introduction to Modern Irish Language and Film

Margo Griffin-Wilson, PhD

Teaching Associate in Modern Irish, University of Cambridge, UK and Associate of the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35070

Description
Students learn to speak Modern Irish (Gaelic) on a beginner’s level, while exploring aspects of Irish culture through Irish language films. Classes include structured lessons on basic Irish grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Oral and listening skills are reinforced by short conversations and recordings of Irish verse and song. A selection of Irish language films (with English subtitles) is viewed in class, with attention to language and cultural issues.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35070/2021

CHEM S-B
The Molecules of Life, Nature, and Industry

Heidi Vollmer-Snarr, PhD

Senior Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories, Harvard University

Mohamed Abdelazim Mohamed, PhD

Visiting Scholar in Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34797

Description
This introductory course teaches students the fundamentals of organic chemistry through its applications in our everyday lives, exploring topics ranging from materials, energy, and the environment to the human biome, medicine, disease, and the ways molecules influence how we think and feel. Students learn to relate the three-dimensional structure of organic molecules to their chemical and physical properties; to identify functional groups exhibiting patterns of reactivity; to predict products of a reaction in the context of thermodynamics and kinetics; and to hypothesize how molecules will react in different environmental contexts. They learn how to think like scientists and be effective problem solvers—skills that are transferable to any future field of study. The course culminates in a final project presentation on a topic of a student’s choice.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections Tuesdays and Thursdays, time to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: High school general chemistry.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34797/2021

CHEM S-1AB
General Chemistry

Gregg Tucci, PhD

Senior Lecturer on Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Justin McCarty, MM

Head Teaching Fellow in General Chemistry, Harvard Division of Continuing Education

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30877

Description
This course is a comprehensive survey of chemistry for the general student that emphasizes the principles underlying the formation and interaction of chemical substances: stoichiometry, states of matter, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, intermolecular forces, solutions, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and environmental chemistry. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of inorganic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 10 am-1 pm

Three 90-minute online discussion sections, one three-hour review session, and three at-home laboratories per week to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. International students should be aware that required lab kits for the course can take up to 3-4 weeks to arrive, so they are advised to register for the course before June 1.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and chemistry. Students must have access to a printer.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 85 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30877/2021

CHEM S-17
Principles of Organic Chemistry

Timothy J. Brunker, DPhil

Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33668

Description
This course is a one-semester (4-credit) introduction to organic chemistry, with an emphasis on structure and bonding, reaction mechanisms, and chemical reactivity. It covers all of the important functional groups and reactivity needed for applications in medicine and biochemistry, including aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, and amides. Students who succeed in in this course are well prepared for the organic chemistry portion of medical school entrance exams and other similar exams. Students who need a full year of organic chemistry (8 credits) should take CHEM S-20ab, which goes into greater depth with extensive coverage of laboratory organic synthesis, spectroscopy, and other topics needed for more advanced study of the subject.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am, or on demand.

Required laboratory sections and optional discussion sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: One year of general chemistry (equivalent to CHEM S-1ab) with a grade of C or better, or equivalent preparation (for example, an AP Chemistry course).

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33668/2021

CHEM S-20AB
Intensive Organic Chemistry

Sirinya Matchacheep, PhD

Lecturer on Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Instructional Laboratory Programs, Harvard University

Peter B. Hamel, MA

Chemistry Teacher, Newton North High School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30609

Description
This course is an intensive, comprehensive introduction to the chemistry of carbon and its importance to living systems. Topics include current ideas of bonding and structure, major reaction mechanisms and pathways, a discussion of the analytical tools used to determine the structure and stereochemistry of organic molecules (such as infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR] spectroscopy), and some of the chemistry of enzymes and cofactors. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of organic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Mondays, 10 am-1 pm; Tuesday-Friday, 10 am-12:30 pm. Required discussion sections, laboratory sections, and weekly review sessions to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: One year of college general chemistry with a grade of B- or higher. Students without adequate background may not be able to keep up with the course. Not recommended for high school students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 100 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30609/2021

CHEM S-101
Experimental Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Heidi Vollmer-Snarr, PhD

Senior Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34861

Description
This is a laboratory course where students carry out chemistry research. Projects are drawn directly from Harvard faculty covering a range of methodologies in chemistry. Students discuss their progress and write formal reports. The course is suitable for students with or without extensive laboratory experience.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: CHEM S-20ab, or Harvard College Chemistry 20/30 or equivalent organic chemistry background, or permission of the instructor. This course is suitable for students with or without extensive laboratory experience.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34861/2021

CHIN S-BA
Elementary Modern Chinese I

Shunan Yang, MA

Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32809

Description
This course is an introduction to basic Chinese grammar, vocabulary, usage, and the writing system for students with little or no background in the language. The course seeks to help students acquire the rudimentary knowledge of Chinese and develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the language. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a good command of the pronunciation system and basic grammar, to be able to conduct daily conversation in simple Chinese, and to read and write short passages. Through learning the language, students gain an initial understanding of some Chinese social and cultural phenomena.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required one-hour sections on Tuesdays and Thursdays to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32809/2021

CHIN S-BAB
Elementary Modern Chinese I, II

Fangzheng Zhang, EdM

Language Instructor in Chinese, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35026

Description
This is an intensive course which covers the regular first-year coursework in the Chinese program at Harvard University. This course is designed for people with little or no background in Mandarin. The goal for this fast-track introductory course is to help students acquire the rudimentary knowledge and develop a basic foundation in the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. In addition, this course furthers develop students’ communicative skills in the listening and speaking modalities, and at the same time shift the focus of instruction gradually towards reading and writing. It provides more practice on syntactic structures, usage, and their communicative functions, and prepares students for intermediate-level courses. At the completion of this course, students have survival-level communication skills to communicate solely in Chinese in common situations of daily life. They can also write about themselves and about those topics that are of personal relevance. Moreover, through learning the language, students gain an initial understanding of some Chinese social and cultural phenomena.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Mondays-Fridays, 9-11 am and noon-2 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35026/2021

CHIN S-120
Intermediate Modern Chinese

Jie Ying, MA

Preceptor in Chinese, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34849

Description
In this intermediate course students develop their conversational and narrative skills using carefully selected vocabulary and grammar. The textbook is based on authentic conversation, moving gradually from casual to formal styles. The textbook covers the most important communicative skills needed by students who want to study or work in China. In addition to language skills, the course provides a deeper understanding of cultural and intellectual differences between US and Chinese societies.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:45 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: One year of college-level Chinese.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34849/2021

CHIN S-130
Pre-Advanced Modern Chinese

Fan Jia, MA

Preceptor in Chinese, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34850

Description
In this third-year course, students study contemporary China and develop their speaking and writing skills by constructing new compounds, using idiomatic expressions, and mastering formal and informal styles. The curriculum is designed to further improve listening and reading abilities through texts geared specifically to the understanding of Chinese culture and society.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Two years of college-level Chinese.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34850/2021

CLAS S-97A
Introduction to the Ancient Greek World

Natasha Bershadsky, PhD

Lecturer on Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35023

Description
This course charts the outlines of what we now call ancient Greece, with its multitude of places, ways of life, and historical changes. We survey the major transformations of that world, its foundational events, real and imagined, its great wars, and its most important social institutions and cultural traditions. We also study everyday features, such as food and dress, to uncover the complex systems of signs to which they belonged. We work with a wide variety of primary sources, both texts and images, and learn about the challenges of interpreting them, assisted by selected items of scholarship. We explore how the ancient Greeks perceived the world and themselves in it, and attempt to listen to the voices of women and slaves that are often muted in our primary sources. Learning about the insights and the blind spots of that civilization, about its mysteries and its drama, may ultimately also help us to know more about ourselves.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35023/2021

CLAS S-97B
Introduction to the Ancient Roman World

Harry B. Morgan, DPhil

College Fellow in the Department of the Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35036

Description
This course has three components: a chronological survey of Roman history from the beginnings to Late Antiquity; thematic explorations of key features of culture and daily life in Rome as well as other parts of Roman Italy and the provinces (including religion, law and government, elite society, Romanization, and urban topography); and an introduction to the tools and methods available for research on the Roman world, with an emphasis on material culture and documentary sources.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35036/2021

COMP S-120
Disease, Illness, and Health through Literature

Karen Thornber, PhD

Harry Tuchman Levin Professor in Literature and Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34814

Description
At some point in our lives, most of us will develop a health condition that requires medical care. We also are likely to be called on to provide care for loved ones. Moreover, as COVID-19 has made glaringly apparent, racial, economic, social, and other inequalities mean many members of society are especially and disproportionately vulnerable to serious health conditions. Engaging with a diverse range of fiction, memoirs, creative non-fiction, life writing, and drama from five continents by physicians, patients (including physician-patients), and concerned citizens, this course helps us interrogate what it means to promote healing and well-being in our personal and professional lives. Readings by creative writers, activists, intellectuals, and medical professionals help us think about how we can more effectively address health crises such as HIV/AIDS, COVID-19, and Alzheimer’s disease, and how we should confront end-of-life decisions and care, including the controversies surrounding physician-assisted dying. Through readings such as Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal, Paul Kalanithi’s When Breath Becomes Air, Anne Fadiman’s When the Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Nawal El-Saadawi’s Memoirs of a Woman Doctor, and Fang Fang’s Wuhan Diary, we reflect on different ways to become strong advocates for practices that reduce suffering and promote healing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Aesthetics and Culture Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1078. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 72 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34814/2021

COMP S-131
Moral Inquiry in the Novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

Justin M. Weir, PhD

Curt Hugo Reisinger Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and of Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35149

Description
This course considers how Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoevsky take up moral inquiry in their fiction, introduces students to philosophical texts that informed their major fiction, and asks why the novel as a literary genre may be a good forum for the discussion of ethics. We read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground and The Brothers Karamazov, as well as selected texts from Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Arthur Schopenhauer, and Friedrich Nietzsche.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Ethics and Civics Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1059. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35149/2021

COMP S-135
Global Crime Fiction

Karen Thornber, PhD

Harry Tuchman Levin Professor in Literature and Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34811

Description
Crime fiction is one of literature’s most popular genres, with hundreds of millions of fans across the globe. These novels fly off shelves from Boston to Barcelona to Beijing and beyond. Why is this? Part of it is in the storytelling. Who can resist a gripping whodunit with unexpected twists and an appealing investigator (professional or amateur), particularly if everything is resolved at the end, often in ways we least expect? But part of the appeal of crime fiction is also the insights this genre can offer into some of the most significant challenges facing societies globally. This course explores a selection of bestselling crime fiction from the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe, examining what these novels tell us about investigating, exposing, and potentially ameliorating crimes and rectifying injustices. We consider how the crimes depicted involve injustices inflicted on vulnerable individuals and communities—people marginalized because of their class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexuality, and other factors.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34811/2021

COMP S-136
The Arab and European Mediterranean from Colonial to Postcolonial

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35119

Description
This course studies the rich and complex history of interaction between France (Europe) and the countries of North Africa (the Arab World), from colonial to postcolonial times. It introduces students to contemporary theoretical, critical, and political debates (including Frantz Fanon, Albert Memmi, and Edward Said) that inform Franco-Arab relations throughout the Mediterranean basin. Readings include travel accounts, ethnographies, memoirs, essays, short stories, and novels. Themes include imperialism, nationalism, religion, ethnicity, migration, and cross-cultural fertilization.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35119/2021

COMP S-140
Global Environmental Literatures

Rebecca H. Hogue, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35127

Description
Drawing on fiction and poetry from the 1960s to the present, this course explores the narrative forms of environmental literatures on all seven continents and the blue continent of Oceania. It asks: how has colonialism shaped, or continued to shape, global environments? Is so-called climate fiction always speculative, or does it reveal our daily realities? From resource extraction and development in the global south to indigenous environmental justice activisms in the Pacific Islands to intercontinental climate change migrations, we use a place-based investigation of ecological relationships with an attention to race, class, sexuality, ability, language, religion, and gender. Course texts include poetry from Guahan (Guam), the Marshall Islands, and Greenland, as well as fiction set in Aotearoa (New Zealand), California, Australia, Antarctica, Italy, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Brazil, and Botswana.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35127/2021

CREA S-25
Beginning Fiction

Mary Sullivan Walsh, BA

Author and Freelance Editor

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33954

Description
Students learn and practice the fundamentals of writing fiction—character, plot, dialogue, description, style—in a workshop setting. By discussing and analyzing published short fiction (our list may include such writers as James Baldwin, Junot Diaz, and Jhumpa Lahiri), students learn the narrative techniques and strategies of creative writers. This course is intended for those who write regularly and wish to develop their skills, talents, and voices.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33954/2021

CREA S-30
Poetry Writing

Stephanie Burt, PhD

Professor of English, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34505

Description
This course is about writing—and, therefore, reading—many kinds of poetry, including brand new open forms, very old rhymed and metered forms, digital native forms, parodies, and (as Yeats put it) “imitation of great masters.” It offers a chance to expand the potential for your own writing, taught mostly in workshop format, as well as a way to find models and allies.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

CREA S-59
Intermediate Screenwriting

Susan Steinberg, PhD

Filmmaker, Writer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34765

Description
In this course for film, television, and documentary scripts, students complete or add significantly to a work in progress. The course focus is problem solving for writers with works in progress and for those who have successfully completed another fiction writing, dramatic writing, or film course. The course is designed to enable participants to work on specific formal issues crucial to excellence in dramatic writing, such as text and subtext, backstory and plot relations, employing metaphor, use of cinematic devices, plant and pay off, and avoiding clichés. Students who wish to start a new script or work in an experimental form may do so with instructor permission.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this course must have completed an introductory screenwriting or dramatic writing course, and/or have written a treatment/outline and at least 30 pages of an original script. Prospective students who have not taken screenwriting but have taken other creative writing courses are encouraged to contact the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34765/2021

CREA S-90
Fundamentals of Fiction

Christopher S. Mooney, MA

Author

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35037

Description
This intensive, immersive course is designed for graduate-credit students with strong writing skills and an interest in becoming fiction writers but little formal experience, students who would like to develop a solid foundation in story and scene structure before embarking on an advanced fiction writing course. The first part of the course focuses on a close analysis of plot and structure in several short stories and novels. Students then apply these techniques and methods to generate and shape their own ideas, build a solid narrative foundation, and use scene structure to craft a dramatic story. Using Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, students explore and learn the fundamentals of character, dialogue, showing versus telling, and point of view. By the end of the course, students complete a short story or the first chapter of a novel (about 15 to 20 pages of fiction), which is workshopped in class.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35037/2021

CREA S-100R
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Short Story

Lindsay Mitchell, MFA

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33639 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive workshop in the craft of writing short fiction for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of short fiction and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). Students are expected to produce two new short stories, 10 to 20 pages each, and to revise them during the term.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning- or intermediate-level fiction writing course or permission of the instructor. Students should bring a 10-page sample of their work to the first class.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33639/2021

CREA S-100R
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Short Story

Leah De Forest, MFA

Writer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35175 | Section 2

Description
This is an intensive workshop in the craft of writing short fiction for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of short fiction and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). Students are expected to produce two new short stories, 10 to 20 pages each, and to revise them during the term.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning- or intermediate-level fiction writing course or permission of the instructor. Students should bring a 10-page sample of their work to the first class.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35175/2021

CREA S-105R
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Novel

William Weitzel, PhD

Senior Language Lecturer in Expository Writing, New York University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35208 | Section 2

Description
This is an intensive course on the craft of writing the novel for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of novelistic form and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). We look closely at modern exemplars, discuss key craft elements native to long-form fiction, and workshop new writing by students.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

CREA S-105R
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Novel

William Weitzel, PhD

Senior Language Lecturer in Expository Writing, New York University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35014 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive course on the craft of writing the novel for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of novelistic form and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). We look closely at modern exemplars, discuss key craft elements native to long-form fiction, and workshop new writing by students.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35014/2021

CREA S-110R
Advanced Poetry Writing: The Art of the Line

David Barber, MFA

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33516

Description
This intensive workshop offers students the opportunity to further develop their aptitude and affinity for the practice of writing in verse lines. In this case verse is understood to mean any and all forms of writing in lines as opposed to prose sentences: metrical verse, blank verse, syllabic verse, free verse, and verse marked by what T. S. Eliot called “the ghost of meter.” Students follow a structured sequence of writing assignments, readings, and exercises aimed at cultivating a sound working knowledge of the fundamental principles of prosody and the evolving possibilities of poetic form. There is a special emphasis on listening to lines and saying poems aloud, in concert with listening to an eclectic assortment of audio archives. Another focus is the verse line through time, as we turn for instruction and inspiration to what the critic Paul Fussell calls the “historical dimension” of poetic meter and poetic form. The collective goal of the course is to create the conditions for reading and writing poems with a stronger sense of technical know-how and expressive conviction as well as a renewed appreciation for the inexhaustible art of the line.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level poetry course or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33516/2021

CREA S-120R
Advanced Screenwriting

Jan Schuette, MA

Director and Producer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33515

Description
Writing the screenplay for the next box office smash or successful independent film requires inspiration; it also requires knowledge of the screenwriter’s craft. This workshop course provides both. Students learn screenwriting techniques—structuring narrative, developing outlines into scripts, and composing scenes and dialog—while writing their own film scripts, which can be inspired by a personal experience, a short story, or a newspaper article. Guest speakers include film industry professionals including entertainment lawyers, screenwriters, and actors. In addition, students view award-winning films screened outside of class time. By the end of the summer term, students have a better understanding of the relationships between structure, scene, and dialogue, and are better equipped to write compelling screenplays.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Students must bring to the first class an idea or a story that will be the foundation of their script.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33515/2021

CREA S-122
Advanced Fiction: Writing Fairy Tales

Katie Beth Kohn, MA

Doctoral Candidate, Visual and Environment Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35176

Description
Fairy tales have inspired authors for centuries, and we are still very much under their spell. In the first part of this course, we study classic as well as contemporary fairy tales, including works by Helen Oyeyemi, Neil Gaiman, Margaret Atwood, and Kelly Link. In the second part, students workshop their own original prose fiction fairy tale, which may be a piece of short-form fiction or an excerpt from a longer work in progress. Throughout, we explore how fairy tales have encouraged authors to develop their own style and voice, even as they seem to speak in a language all their own.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning fiction writing class or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35176/2021

CREA S-124
Writing for TV

Bryan Delaney, MA

Playwright and Screenwriter

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33878

Description
The course provides students with an introduction to the basics of writing for TV, including contemporary digital platforms such as Netflix and Amazon. Topics covered include generating ideas for a series, half-hour comedy versus hour-long drama, writing a treatment/pitch bible for the show, writing a good pilot, episode structure, dramatic conflict, characterization, dialogue, working in a writers’ room, dealing with notes, and understanding the hierarchy. The course also focuses on the business side of writing for TV, that is, pitching, dealing with agents, producers, and more. During the course, students work on the pilot episode of their own original TV show.

Class Meetings:
Online with required weekend meeting
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Along with the web-conference meetings, this course includes an intensive—and mandatory—online weekend residency. Students must be present for the entire weekend session to earn credit for the course. The course begins via web conference during the first week of the Summer School term, and continues to meet through the week ending August 6. Please see the course website or syllabus for the specific weekly course meeting dates.

Prerequisites: Students should come to the class with an idea for a TV series that they’d like to write (drama or comedy, or comedy/drama hybrid).

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33878/2021

CREA S-126
Advanced Fiction: Writing Horror

Katie Beth Kohn, MA

Doctoral Candidate, Visual and Environment Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35040

Description
How do authors achieve the spine-tingling, bone-chilling, nightmare-inducing effects of great horror fiction? In addition to studying works of classic and contemporary horror, students in this course complete two works of short fiction before workshopping and presenting a final work. Throughout, we consider the diversity of the genre, from the gothic romanticism of Bram Stoker and Nathaniel Hawthorne to the paranoiac parables of Shirley Jackson and Ira Levin, as well as the blockbuster works of Stephen King. We also pay considerable attention to emerging voices in the genre, studying selected works from Tananarive Due, Paul Tremblay, Carmen Maria Machado, Otessa Moshfegh, Emily Carroll, and Iain Reed. For final works, students are invited to workshop standalone works of short-form fiction or selections from larger projects (novels, anthologies, or scripts) provided these works are developed and drafted during the course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35040/2021

CREA S-129
The Art of the Essay

Chris Walsh, PhD

Director, College of Arts and Sciences Writing Program, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35029

Description
This intensive reading and writing workshop is for students who want to immerse themselves in the long essayistic tradition in order to make their own contributions to it. Reading ancient and modern masterworks from The Art of the Personal Essay, edited by Phillip Lopate, and select contemporary pieces from the latest Best American Essays, edited by Leslie Jamison, gives students models to follow (and to break away from) in their own work. Accomplished professional essayists and editors also visit the class. Past visitors have included Steve Almond, Leah Hager Cohen, James Geary, and Joan Wickersham. By building on the prose skills that they bring to the course and drawing on the feedback of their classmates, students cultivate their own voices as essayists.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An beginning-level writing course or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35029/2021

CREA S-131
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Novella

Thomas Wisniewski, PhD

Lecturer on Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35027

Description
Before the novel was the novella. In length, the form offers what Edgar Allan Poe defines as the ideal duration of literary art—it can be read in a single sitting—and, in unity of effect, what Ian McEwan has called the perfect form of prose fiction. With a long literary history, the novella remains today a popular genre in literary publishing. This course offers students the chance to study and practice the art of the novella. Students read masterful examples of the form from writers including Jane Austen, Herman Melville, Henry James, Isak Dinesen, Yasunari Kawabata, James Baldwin, Italo Svevo, and James Joyce. We discuss these texts with the eye of a writer attentive to elements of craft: dramatic structure, tone, point of view, suspense, prose style, rhythm, characterization, and plotting. Students draft and workshop two sections of their own novella. Working in this genre pushes students to write with economy and to polish their sentences as they aspire towards the virtues of excellent prose fiction: precision, economy, clarity, and urgency. The course concludes with a conversation about publishing possibilities for novella writers.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

CREA S-156
The Art of the Pitch

Catherine Eaton, MFA

Director and Writer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34743

Description
You have an idea, or you’ve created a brilliant piece of work: a novel, a screenplay, a concept for a TV series—maybe even a scripted nonfiction podcast. Now what? How do you convince others to jump on board to buy or create or collaborate or publish or produce your story? How do you move it out of your desk drawer or hard drive or imagination, and into the world? In this course, we break down the making of a pitch into its core elements as we practice strategies for producing pitch materials and for pitching your project in the room to a live audience. Students write and revise three treatments: one for an established work, one for a work they’ve created, and one for an idea they are developing. Students write a query letter, build a pitch deck, and do three live pitches. Finally, students develop an insider’s perspective on industry practices and etiquette, essential knowledge for anyone interested in the business of creation.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An advanced-level creative writing course or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34743/2021

CREA S-175
Legal Writing

Rosemary Daly, JD

Adjunct Professor of Law and Director of Advocacy Programs, Boston College Law School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30140

Description
This course is designed for law students, students considering law school, or writers who wish to improve their analytical writing. It is based on the assumption that good legal writing communicates well-considered ideas clearly, concisely, and accurately. Students use the elements of good writing to construct legal arguments, to argue from precedent and principle, and to use facts effectively. They draft a variety of basic legal documents that may include a case brief, a complaint, an answer, an opinion letter, a legal memorandum, and a statute. Course materials may be based on contemporary social issues drawing on the areas of constitutional due process, criminal law, domestic relations law, and the right to privacy.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30140/2021

CREA S-490
Writing Residency: Fiction

Daphne Kalotay, PhD

Lecturer in Creative Writing, Princeton University

Jane A. Rosenzweig, MFA

Director of the Writing Center and Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson, PhD

Editor, <em>Harvard Review</em>, Harvard College Library

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34594 | Section 2

Description
Please note that this section of the creative writing residency is for fiction writers, but it can accommodate students working in the area of dramatic writing. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 16. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency are focused on the editing and manuscript submission process.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Week one: Monday-Friday, July 12-16, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 17-18, 10 am-noon and 1-4 pm. Weeks two and three: Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 20, 22, 27 and 29, 3:15-6:15 pm. See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 29.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 28, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original work. The manuscript may be a short story or the opening of a novel. Dramatic writers may submit a scene from a script. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34594/2021

CREA S-490
Writing Residency: Nonfiction

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 35163 | Section 3

Description
The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. This section is specifically for nonfiction writers. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 16. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency are focused on the editing and manuscript submission process.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Week one: Monday-Friday, July 12-16, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 17-18, 10 am-noon and 1-4 pm. Weeks two and three: Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 20, 22, 27 and 29, 3:15-6:15 pm. See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 29.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 28, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original nonfiction. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

CREA S-490
Writing Residency: Fiction

Rachel Kadish, MA

MFA in Creative Writing Faculty, Lesley University

Jane A. Rosenzweig, MFA

Director of the Writing Center and Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson, PhD

Editor, <em>Harvard Review</em>, Harvard College Library

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34206 | Section 1

Description
Please note that this section of the creative writing residency is specifically for fiction writers. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 16. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency are focused on the editing and manuscript submission process.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Week one: Monday-Friday, July 12-16, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 17-18, 10 am-noon and 1-4 pm. Weeks two and three: Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 20, 22, 27 and 29, 3:15-6:15 pm. See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 29.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 28, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original work. The manuscript may be a short story or the opening of a novel. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34206/2021

CSCI S-1B
Computer Science for Business Professionals

David J. Malan, PhD

Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34827

Description
This course is a variant of Harvard College’s introduction to computer science, CS50, designed especially for business professionals. Whereas CS50 itself takes a bottom-up approach, emphasizing mastery of low-level concepts and implementation details thereof, this course takes a top-down approach, emphasizing mastery of high-level concepts and design decisions related thereto. Ultimately, this course empowers students to make technological decisions even if not technologists themselves. Topics include cloud computing, networking, privacy, scalability, security, and more, with an emphasis on web and mobile technologies. Students emerge from this course with first-hand appreciation of how it all works and all the more confident in the factors that should guide their decision making. This course is designed for managers, product managers, founders, and decision makers more generally.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34827/2021

CSCI S-3
Introduction to Web Programming Using JavaScript

Laurence P. Bouthillier, MS

Executive Director, University of British Columbia Extended Learning

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35164

Description
This course provides an introduction to web development by way of the essential language and runtime environment that powers modern web interfaces. Through a series of examples and projects, students learn basic programming concepts while building an understanding of the power and complexities of JavaScript, which can perplex even experienced web developers. The course provides a solid foundation in computer programming in JavaScript: syntax and data structures, conditionals, objects, scope and closures, Ajax, the DOM, and event handling. Other topics include form handling and validation, writing and extending web video players, and animations and drawing on the canvas. Students gain an understanding of the popular libraries and frameworks that power rich web applications such as jQuery, VueJS, and others. Upon completion, students are prepared to use JavaScript and JS libraries in their projects, write their own or extend existing JavaScript libraries, and build rich web applications using these powerful tools.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Prior experience with basic HTML and CSS is important. Students with no prior exposure to programming may find the summer session very challenging and should plan on a significant time commitment, or may want to consider taking the course during a full semester offering at the Harvard Extension School.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35164/2021

CSCI S-5A
Programming in R

Theodore Hatch Whitfield, ScD

Principal and Statistical Consultant, Biostatistics Solutions

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34495

Description
This course features a comprehensive overview of the R programming language, with an emphasis on developing practical skills for real-world applications. The first half of the course is an introduction to the fundamental tools of imperative and functional programming such as atomic and compound data types, variables, loops, conditional branching, and functions. Both general principles of computation as well as R-specific idioms are explored. The second half of the course focuses on the cleaning, transformation, and management of data. Methods for visualizing data are integrated into each lecture, as well as techniques for summarizing data. Upon completion, students have an R programming toolkit that enables them to resolve many challenging problems when working with data.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and geometry. Prior experience with another high-level programming language is helpful but not required.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34495/2021

CSCI S-7
Introduction to Computer Science with Python

Henry H. Leitner, PhD

Senior Lecturer on Computer Science, Harvard University

Dimitri Kountourogianni, MA

Senior Software Engineer, Google

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34533

Description
This course is an introduction to computer science for students without prior programming experience. We explore problem-solving methods and algorithm development using the high-level programming language Python after a brief introduction to computational concepts using Scratch. Python is a language with a simple syntax, and a powerful set of libraries. While Python is easy for beginners to learn, it is widely used in many scientific areas for data exploration. We cover basic data types and collections (lists, dictionaries, tuples, and sets), control flow, recursion, information hiding and encapsulation using classes and objects, and introduce the analysis of program performance. The examples and problems used in this course are drawn from diverse areas such as text processing and simple graphics creation. We also examine theoretical and practical limitations related to unsolvable and intractable computational problems.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34533/2021

CSCI S-12
Fundamentals of Website Development

David P. Heitmeyer, AM

Director of Academic Platforms and Development, Harvard University Information Technology

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33291

Description
This course provides a comprehensive overview of website development. Students explore the prevailing vocabulary, tools, and standards used in the field and learn how the various facets—including HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, Ajax, multimedia, scripting languages, HTTP, clients, servers, and databases—function together in today’s web environment. The course provides a solid web development foundation, focusing on content and client-side (browser) components, with an overview of the server-side technologies. In addition, software and services that are easily incorporated into a website (for example, maps, checkout, blogs, content management) are surveyed. Students produce an interactive website on the topic of their choice for the final project and leave the course prepared for more advanced web development studies.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Basic familiarity working with computers, including file management.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33291/2021

CSCI S-14A
Building Interactive Web Applications for Data Analysis

Zona Kostic, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34493

Description
This course covers techniques for creating custom exploratory data analysis tools. Students learn how to process data into a web application taking care of both front-end visual attractiveness and back-end functionality. Python-based frameworks and visualization libraries are used for building the fully functional project architectures. Upon completion, project setups are deployed to the cloud infrastructure, leveraging the dynamic nature of data-intensive applications.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with Python programming language, basic data science concepts, and experience with front-end development. Some experience with data visualization is useful, but not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 48 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34493/2021

CSCI S-20
Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

Rebecca Nesson, PhD

Associate Dean, Harvard College Curriculum and Associate Senior Lecturer on Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34851

Description
This course teaches all the math not taught in the traditional calculus/linear algebra sequence that is needed to take more advanced courses in theory of computation and/or algorithms. That is, it teaches discrete mathematics, logic, and basic probability, but does not teach calculus or linear algebra. It also gives a good introduction to reading mathematical notation and writing formal proofs. A principal objective of the course is to not just teach a set of mathematical topics, but also to prepare students to think mathematically and to read and write mathematics. It is a fast-moving course that demands a substantial commitment of time and effort for students to be successful.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. The pre-recorded lectures are the same as those used in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences course Computer Science 20.

Prerequisites: MATH S-Ar, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 90 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34851/2021

CSCI S-33A
Web Programming with Python and JavaScript

Brian Paul Yu, EdM

Senior Preceptor, Division of Continuing Education, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34139

Description
This course examines the design and implementation of web applications with Python, JavaScript, and SQL using frameworks like Django, React, and Bootstrap. Topics include database design, scalability, security, and user experience. Through hands-on projects, students learn to write and use APIs, create interactive user interfaces (UIs), and leverage cloud services like GitHub and Heroku. By semester’s end, students emerge with knowledge and experience in the principles, languages, and tools that empower them to design and deploy applications on the internet.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-50, CS50x, or at least one year of experience with Python.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34139/2021

CSCI S-36
Advanced User Experience Engineering

David S. Platt, ME

President, Rolling Thunder Computing, Inc.

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34521

Description
This course provides a practical workshop for exercising and improving the skills learned in CSCI E-34, under direct supervision of the instructor. We work together on one specific user experience (UX) project, to be selected by the instructor. The output of the class is a complete analysis of a UX design problem and solution. This course does not involve actual building of the software. Rather, the goal is to produce a UX specification that can be handed off to the coders. In each class meeting, students work for about an hour on a design item (persona or story). Students then present their output to the class for critique and analysis. The instructor works alongside students, assisting as needed, while also preparing his own solution, which is also presented. Students may work individually or in groups, depending on the number of registered students. We also hear guest speakers that present topics that enhance this project.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CSCI E-34 or equivalent industrial experience. More than for most computer science classes, you must be ready to think in new ways, to participate in discussions, to experiment, and to challenge the assumptions you have worked with throughout your career. Bring an open mind and a thick skin.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34521/2021

CSCI S-38
Introduction to C++ for Programmers

Lisa DiOrio, MS

Owner and Lead Developer, Fembot Creative

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33956

Description
An understanding of C++ helps to solidify knowledge of programming concepts and provides a strong foundation for learning other programming languages. This course takes students’ programming skills to the next level by emphasizing practical programming skills while focusing on creating text-based games. The course examines common programming constructs as they are implemented in C++ including C++ 11. Topics include the use of C++ for memory management, file input/output (I/O), pointers, references, exceptions, and object-oriented programming. Basic data structures such as linked lists, stacks, and queues are covered in terms of their usage and implementation using C++. Modules in the course are accompanied by a mini-game project to teach the associated programming concepts as well as to hone problem-solving skills and good coding practices.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A working knowledge of a structured programming language such as C, Java, Javascript, or Python.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33956/2021

CSCI S-40
Communication Protocols and Internet Architectures

Leonard Evenchik, SM

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33106

Description
This course provides a structured technical approach to the design, analysis, and implementation of internet protocols and network architectures. We study various systems and protocols, including: TCP/IP, encryption and security protocols, e-mail/SMTP, DNS and DoH, routing protocols (RIP, OSPF, and BGP), and the LAN protocol suite. The course also discusses new and important areas of work, including multimedia protocols for voice and video, gigabit wireless networks, the internet of things (IoT), software-defined networks (SDN), and network functions virtualization (NFV).

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course CSCI E-40.

Prerequisites: Some programming and internet experience.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33106/2021

CSCI S-44B
Network Security and Vulnerability Testing

Ric Messier, MS

Senior Information Security Consultant, FireEye Mandiant

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35122

Description
In the information security world, the best defense is a good offense. It is far better to get attacked by an ally, to better understand your own weaknesses, than to learn about your weaknesses after they have been exploited by an adversary. This course explores tactics and techniques of offensive security as a means of improving an organization’s overall security posture. The course examines organizational security goals and testing strategies, and how organizations perform penetration tests as an aspect of a complete offensive security strategy.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students should have a foundation in information security principles and strong familiarity with their computer system. No programming experience is required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35122/2021

CSCI S-49A
Cryptography and Identity Management for Blockchain and Cloud Applications

Ramesh Nagappan, MS

Security Technologist, Amazon

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34482

Description
Confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, authorization, and accountability are the most critical security requirements that serve as the basis for deploying and delivering trustworthy information technology applications and services in enterprises, mobile devices, and via cloud providers. Adopting cryptography and identity management techniques addresses these security requirements and has become a vital part of all business applications and electronic transactions. This course provides ground-up coverage on the high-level concepts, applied mechanisms, architecture, and real-world implementation practices of cryptography and identity management techniques as they apply to blockchain and cloud-hosted applications and services.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: CSCI E-49, CSCI E-90, CSCI E-118, or equivalent. Experience with web application development and/or systems administration using a cloud provider is helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34482/2021

CSCI S-50
Intensive Introduction to Computer Science

David J. Malan, PhD

Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34745

Description
This course is an intensive introduction to the intellectual enterprises of computer science and the art of programming. It is a fast-moving course that demands a substantial commitment of time and effort for students to be successful. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, security, software engineering, and web development. Languages include C, Python, SQL, and JavaScript plus CSS and HTML. Problem sets are inspired by real-world domains of biology, cryptography, finance, forensics, and gaming. Students can count two of the following three courses—CSCI E-10aCSCI E-10b, and CSCI E-50—toward a degree. They cannot count all three toward an Extension School degree.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences course Computer Science 50 (CS50).

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34745/2021

CSCI S-63C
Elements of Data Science and Statistical Learning with R

Andrey Sivachenko, PhD

Senior Scientist II, Head of Bioinformatics, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Lab

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34799

Description
One of the broad goals of data science is examining raw data with the purpose of identifying their structure and trends, and deriving conclusions and hypotheses from the latter. In the modern world awash with data, data analytics is more important than ever to fields ranging from biomedical research, space and weather science, finance, business operations, and production, through marketing and social media applications. This course provides an intensive introduction into various statistical learning methods; the R programming language, a very popular and powerful platform for scientific and statistical analysis and visualization, is also introduced and used throughout the course. We discuss the fundamentals of statistical testing and learning, and cover topics of linear and non-linear regression, regularization, unsupervised methods (principle component analysis [PCA] and clustering), and supervised classification, including support vector machines, random forests, and neural nets, using datasets drawn from diverse domains. This course is geared less toward theory (although some is presented, mostly qualitatively), and more toward developing intuition and the right way of thinking about statistical problems, as well as building practical skills through multiple, incremental assignments and extensive experimentation.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Good programming skills, preferably in R or solid experience in other languages; good understanding of probability and statistics at the level of CSCI E-106 or STAT E-109. See the syllabus for the recommended pretest.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 75 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34799/2021

CSCI S-65G
Introduction to Mobile Application Development Using Swift and iOS

Ronald V. Simmons, MBA

Principal, Computecycles, LLC

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33540

Description
This course introduces the basics of contemporary mobile application development using Apple’s iOS technology as the development platform. The main requirement of the course is to build a functioning application in iOS. Each week covers a different aspect of development which is used in the final project. We begin with the major features of the Swift programming language and its standard library, along with basic use of the Xcode integrated development environment (IDE) for Swift development. Basic language features are covered lightly so that extensive discussion may be focused on differentiating features of the language including closures, optionals, the Swift type system (tuple/enum/struct/class/func), and generics. Special attention is paid to functional programming concepts such as map/reduce. Then we extend the programming model to incorporate aspects of functional reactive programming using Apple’s Combine platform. We complete the non-user interface (UI) portion of the course with an extended discussion of correct application architecture using a unidirectional dataflow model. Next we focus on Apple’s SwiftUI framework focusing on view composition, layout, event handling, and various graphics techniques. We complete the UI portion of the course with an extensive discussion of animation and fluid user interface design, making extensive use of Apple’s Preview technology. Frequent small assignments progress from basic programming to realistic application development with a focus on responsive device graphics and algorithms. Code design and architecture are emphasized.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: While this course is an introduction to mobile development, it is not an introductory programming course. Students must have a working knowledge of at least one object-oriented programming language such as Java or C++; a semester-long course in data structures or the equivalent; a firm understanding of how to compile code, use libraries, and use a debugger; and the ability to use a source control tool such as Git. Students must have a Macintosh laptop running a current version of the operating system with the most recent version of Apple’s Xcode IDE installed. It is not possible to use a Windows or Linux computer because code written on those platforms cannot be deployed to either an iOS simulator or device.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33540/2021

CSCI S-71
Agile Software Development

Richard Kasperowski, ALB

Consultant

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33524

Description
This course is an immersive experience in agile software development. We study both the technical and business, cultural, and social aspects of agile, including pair and mob programming, high-performance teams with the core protocols, test-driven development (TDD), behavior-driven development, continuous delivery, refactoring, extreme programming, scrum, kanban, and agile project management.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: CSCI E-22. Students should have a computer suitable for software development.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33524/2021

CSCI S-80
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence with Python

Brian Paul Yu, EdM

Senior Preceptor, Division of Continuing Education, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34744

Description
This course explores the concepts and algorithms at the foundation of modern artificial intelligence, diving into the ideas that give rise to technologies like game-playing engines, handwriting recognition, and machine translation. Through hands-on projects, students gain exposure to the theory behind graph search algorithms, classification, optimization, reinforcement learning, and other topics in artificial intelligence and machine learning as they incorporate them into their own Python programs. By course’s end, students emerge with experience in libraries for machine learning as well as knowledge of artificial intelligence principles that enable them to design intelligent systems of their own.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-50, CS50x, or at least one year of experience with Python.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34744/2021

CSCI S-89
Introduction to Deep Learning

Dmitry V. Kurochkin, PhD

Senior Research Analyst, Faculty of Arts and Sciences Office for Faculty Affairs, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34723

Description
In this course students are introduced to the architecture of deep neural networks, algorithms that are developed to extract high-level feature representations of data. In addition to theoretical foundations of neural networks, including backpropagation and stochastic gradient descent, students get hands-on experience building deep neural network models with Python. Topics covered in the course include image classification, time series forecasting, text vectorization (tf-idf and word2vec), natural language translation, speech recognition, and deep reinforcement learning. Students learn how to use application program interfaces (APIs), such as TensorFlow and Keras, for building a variety of deep neural networks: convolutional neural network (CNN), recurrent neural network (RNN), self-organizing maps (SOM), generative adversarial network (GANs), and long short-term memory (LSTM). Some of the models will require the use of graphics processing unit (GPU) enabled Amazon Machine Images (AMI) in Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python programming equivalent to CSCI S-7. Basic knowledge of calculus, probability, and statistics is expected. Familiarity with linear algebra is helpful but not required. Students are expected to have access to a computer with a 64-bit operating system and at least 8 GB of RAM. GPU is highly recommended. No familiarity with Amazon Web Services (AWS) is assumed.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34723/2021

CSCI S-96
Data Mining, Discovery, and Exploration

Stephen Elston, PhD

Principal Consultant, Quantia Analytics LLC

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34203

Description
Data mining seeks to find valuable insights and relationships in large complex data sets. Applications of data mining include web search, interactions in social networks, finding relationships in large internet-of-things (IOT) sensor networks, and finding interactions between drugs. This course surveys a range of algorithms used for key applications of data mining. The emphasis is on unsupervised and semi-supervised learning, and includes discussion of supervised learning and graph algorithms. Scaling and computational efficiency of data mining algorithms is discussed. The course is comprised of readings and lectures on theory along with hands-on exercises and projects where students apply the theory. For the hands-on component of the course, students use a variety of libraries in the Python language. Examples include Scikit-Learn, Spark ML, NLTK, Surprise, and GraphX. Students give a short presentation on their projects during the last class meeting(s). Students enrolled for graduate credit are required to submit an independent project that demonstrates mastery of the methods covered in the course as applied to a suitable real-world data set. Students who complete the course are able to: apply the theory of common data mining algorithms to a variety of real-world applications with an understanding of the limitations of each; apply exploratory data mining methods to find valuable relationships in large complex data sets; make use of commonly used data mining Python libraries to create basic data mining solutions; understand and apply methods required to scale data mining algorithms; and understand the ethical and privacy issues inherent in some data mining applications.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Some background in Python programming (equivalent to CSCI E-7 or CSCI E-50) and statistical modeling (equivalent to CSCI E-63c). Knowledge of basic linear algebra is essential.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34203/2021

CSCI S-101
Foundations of Data Science and Engineering

Bruce Huang, PhD

Director of Master’s Degree Program in Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35160

Description
Most data scientists spend 20 percent of their time building data models and analyzing model results. What do they do with the remaining 80 percent of their time? The answer is data engineering. Data engineering is a subdiscipline of software engineering that focuses on the transportation, transformation, and management of data. This course takes a comprehensive approach to explore data science, which includes data engineering concepts and techniques. Key topics include data management and transformation, exploratory data analysis and visualization, statistical thinking and machine learning, natural language processing, and storytelling with data, emphasizing the integration of Python, MySQL, Tableau, development, and big data analytics platforms. Students cannot earn Harvard Extension School degree credit for CSCI S-101 if it is taken after CSCI E-29.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-7, CSCI S-50, or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35160/2021

CSCI S-109A
Introduction to Data Science

Kevin A. Rader, PhD

Senior Preceptor in Statistics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34716

Description
This course focuses on the analysis of messy, real life data to perform predictions using statistical and machine learning methods. Material covered integrates the five key facets of an investigation using data: data collection—data wrangling, cleaning, and sampling to get a suitable data set; data management—accessing data quickly and reliably; exploratory data analysis—generating hypotheses and building intuition; prediction or statistical learning; and communication—summarizing results through visualization, stories, and interpretable summaries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections Fridays, 12-3 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Prerequisites: Programming knowledge at the level of CSCI S-50 or above, statistics knowledge at the level of STAT S-100 or above (STAT S-110 recommended), and calculus (MATH S-1ab or the equivalent) required. It is recommended that students have received a grade of B+ or better in these courses before enrolling in CSCI S-109a.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 130 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34716/2021

CSCI S-111
Intensive Introduction to Computer Science Using Java

David G. Sullivan, PhD

Master Lecturer on Computer Science, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32344

Description
This course is a fast-paced and rigorous introduction to computer science. The first half of the course covers foundational programming concepts such as data types, conditional execution, iteration, and recursion. It also explores the key features of object-oriented programming, as well as the manipulation of data stored in files and arrays. The second half of the course provides a survey of fundamental data structures including lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. It explores the implementation of these data structures using both array-based and linked representations, and it examines classic algorithms that use these structures for tasks such as sorting, searching, and text compression. Techniques for analyzing the efficiency of algorithms are also covered. Problem sets require a minimum of twenty hours of work each week, including both written problems and programming exercises using the Java programming language. Graduate-credit students are expected to complete additional work. The course includes coverage of the key topics needed for the AP Computer Science A examination. Students who have completed the Harvard Extension School courses CSCI E-10a, CSCI E-10b, CSCI E-22, or CSCI E-50 cannot earn degree credit for CSCI S-111.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with precalculus.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32344/2021

CSCI S-597
Data Science Precapstone

Bruce Huang, PhD

Director of Master’s Degree Program in Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34439

Description
This course helps students develop an academically strong capstone proposal. It is mandatory for candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, data science, who wish to register for CSCI E-599a in the fall. It prepares students to explore interdisciplinary research topics from a variety of industries and areas. Through workshops and collaborating with experts from different disciplines, students identify research topics, apply the appropriate data science methods, and use data to advance innovative solutions. Students receive guidance and advising to work effectively in teams, refine project proposals, and build the domain knowledge necessary in their selected area. By the end of the course, each team submits a detailed research proposal, including project rationale, methods, and expected outcomes, which they intend to execute during CSCI E-599a.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted candidates in Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), data science and in their penultimate semester. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and in the process of successfully completing all degree requirements except the Harvard Extension School capstone, CSCI E-599A, which they must enroll in for the 2021 fall term as their final course. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 22 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34439/2021

CZEC S-BAB
Intensive Intermediate Czech

Veronika Tuckerova, PhD

Preceptor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35167

Description
This intensive course provides a comprehensive continuing course in modern Czech language and culture for those who would like to speak Czech or use the language for reading and research. Designed for students with previous study of Czech, the course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing). The course features further development of vocabulary and oral expression within a comprehensive review of Czech grammar. Czech culture is explored through readings, screenings, and in-class discussions. This course prepares students to continue in Czech at the advanced level or for study or travel abroad in the Czech Republic.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Mondays-Fridays, 9 am-12 noon and Mondays-Thursdays, 1-2:45 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: One year of college-level Czech, or Czech Ab offered in Harvard College, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35167/2021

DEVP S-599
Global Development Practice Capstone

Judith Irene Rodriguez, MA

Research Associate, Zofnass Program for Sustainable Infrastructure, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 35007

Description
This course is a capstone designed for students earning a Master of Liberal Arts, global development practice. The course approach is learner-centered, whereby students create a development plan for a client by applying skills and knowledge gained from their graduate school experience. This course builds upon the student’s guided prework completed in DEVP E-598. The course deliverables include a detailed actionable and measurable plan, as well as a presentation to be given to the class and to client stakeholders. Appropriate clients may include communities, corporations, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), governmental agencies, schools, universities, and hospitals. Students work with a client with one or more stakeholders to develop and deliver a customized development plan focused on one or more of these areas: community development, human rights, labor practices, education, environmental sustainability, and fair operating practices. Listings of prior projects may be viewed at the global development practice capstone website.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Final paper/project due Friday, August 20.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), global development practice. Candidates must be in good academic standing, in their final semester, and have successfully completed the Harvard Extension School precapstone tutorial, DEVP E-598, in the 2021 spring term. Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35007/2021

DGMD S-1
Digital Media: From Ideas to Designs and Prototypes

Bakhtiar Mikhak, PhD

Co-Founder, Media Modifications, Ltd.

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34801

Description
This is a practical design course on perspectives, tools, and methods for going from an idea for a product or service powered by a mobile and/or web application to an interactive design prototype ready for handoff to a development team. We begin with creating detailed personas and stories that capture why and for whom the product or service is developed. We then translate those personas and stories into storyboards that illustrate the application’s experiential flow in real-world contexts in terms of concrete visual and interaction design elements. We develop a component-based design system for creating interactive prototypes with live data. Our focus is on designing novel user experiences and leveraging third-party user interface kits to give our prototypes a professional look and feel. We create prototypes with a visual design tool that also allows creating and enhancing components with code for imagining and realizing even richer interactions and experience flows. Technologies used in this course include Gatsby, Adobe XD, Framer X, React, Github, Visual Studio Code, and Netlify.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34801/2021

DGMD S-9
Introduction to Digital Photography

Leonie Marinovich, BA

Documentary Photographer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34478

Description
This course is aimed at students wishing to master the fundamentals of photography. It gives students the opportunity to learn photography using their digital camera (DSLR or mirrorless) and acquire the skills to use manual settings and use the different shooting modes available on their cameras. Topics covered in this class include the fundamentals of exposure, composition, lighting, editing techniques, color correction, delivery for print and digital media, metadata creation, and digital workflow management. We study classical art that has heavily influenced photography in the way that images are composed and lighted. The course is helpful to students who wish to explore digital photography as a way to document their field work and other work in progress and enhance their visual literacy, enabling them to assess images and other visual media. Students are taught Lightroom to manage their digital archives and learn to use editing techniques to enhance their images. Coursework is structured along two main components: technical mastery and aesthetic development. Students are first taught the technical skills which they then apply in practical exercises to consolidate those skills. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to have mastered their camera and their images should look more polished.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students do not need prior experience as photographers, but an interest in visual aesthetics is strongly recommended. Students need to have a digital camera (DSLR or mirrorless) with the ability to manually control aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. A “point-and-shoot” camera will not be sufficient in fulfilling all the criteria required in the assignments. A tripod is required. Students need a computer with Lightroom Classic CC installed. Photoshop is not required. Along with a computer, students need an external hard drive and memory cards for their camera.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34478/2021

DGMD S-14
Wearable Devices and Computer Vision

Jose Luis Ramirez Herran, ALM

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34484

Description
In this course we introduce the basic concepts of embedded systems programming, wearable devices, interfaces with motion and environmental sensors via Bluetooth, and integration of computer vision algorithms for augmented reality (AR) in wearable devices via video and pictures. Applications are in the field of augmented reality systems including wearable devices such as helmets, contacts, headsets, and AR glasses. This course covers the theoretical background of the concepts used and provides step by step tutorials for hands-on learning, where students gain confidence developing reference designs which give them ideas of how to propose their own ideas and projects. We cover an introduction to image processing and computer vision and computer vision architectures based on convolutional neural networks, and object detection image segmentation and synthesis.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Basic high school math and high school linear algebra (matrices) required. Some basic experience with a programming language (such as Python) is required too.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34484/2021

DGMD S-17
Robotics, Autonomous Vehicles, Drones, and Artificial Intelligence

Jose Luis Ramirez Herran, ALM

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34560

Description
Practical advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are ushering in a new era of digital automation. In the next ten to fifteen years, drones, driverless vehicles, and artificial intelligence will be used to transport goods, send packages, perform agricultural tasks, and transport people in an efficient and safe way. In this course students learn the algorithms that underlie an autonomous vehicle’s understanding of itself and the world around it. They learn how a car can use unreliable sensor data to make accurate predictions of its location in the world. This algorithm, called SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping), relies on Bayesian inference, tracking algorithms, Kalman filtering, and sensor fusion. Students learn how to use an algorithm that employs a map and traffic information to find the quickest route between two points. Students also use code that helps them simulate, visualize, test, and debug the trajectories that comes from the search and control algorithms using the most popular visualization libraries. Finally, students learn the system architecture of the autonomous navigation vehicles and how to integrate all the algorithms.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Basic experience writing/debugging code and looking up documentation. Familiarity with basic linear algebra and geometry.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34560/2021

DGMD S-30
Introduction to Media Production

Nicholas J. Manley, MFA

Producer and Content Developer, Cambridge Institute of Communication Arts

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33105

Description
This course is a complete movie-making academy in seven weeks. Working in small groups and guided by the instructor, students learn the basics of single-camera video production, field audio recording, and lighting for documentary and narrative film. Students learn how to light an interview like a pro, make the most of their equipment in the field, and break down any script into manageable pieces ready for shooting. Applying these techniques, students produce a short documentary or narrative film project on their own, and edit and deliver that movie using Adobe Premiere. We screen and critique students’ work as it evolves and refine methods for strengthening stories by looking at successful movies that have cracked the code. This course is designed for anyone who wants a crash course in producing quality video on a shoestring budget, and for storytellers who want to translate their ideas into compelling videos of any kind.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Students can use DSLRs, video cameras, smartphones, or tablets to shoot and record media content. A tripod or camera stabilizer will also be needed. An audio recorder is beneficial but not required. The instructor will share different gear options prior to the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33105/2021

DGMD S-35
Video Editing and Digital Design

Allyson Sherlock, MFA

Affiliated Faculty in Visual and Media Arts, Emerson College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33286

Description
This course serves as an introduction to the art of video post-production. We explore the theory and practice of various editing styles in order to gain a better understanding of how stories are constructed in the editing room. Through demonstrations and hands-on experience, students learn advanced editing techniques with an in-depth examination of Adobe Premiere. To further enhance projects, students create animated motion graphics using After Effects and learn how to correct sound problems with Adobe Audition. Footage is provided for all exercises and projects. However, students are given the option to shoot new material for their final projects if desired.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Experience with Macintosh computers.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33286/2021

DGMD S-42
Making the Short Film: Innovations and Practices for the Digital Age

Allyson Sherlock, MFA

Affiliated Faculty in Visual and Media Arts, Emerson College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35031

Description
Short films are an exciting and ever-evolving form of storytelling in the digital age. This course explores the strong tradition short films have in our culture, as well as the new and innovative techniques filmmakers are currently using to tell and distribute their stories. In this course, students devote the entire term to the creation and completion of one short film, narrative or documentary, with the intent of festival submission and/or online release. Students work in a collaborative atmosphere with classmates and the instructor to refine scripts and treatments, plan productions, and create the final film. Students may work individually or partner in a collaborative team. Either way, the class serves as a support system for each student, offering advice, critiques, and resources so that each member of the class is an integral part of a fully realized short. In addition to supporting traditional filmmaking approaches, innovative storytelling techniques are strongly welcomed and supported. These can include interactive online documentaries, hybrid approaches (blending fiction and nonfiction), webisode pilots, and experimental techniques. Additionally, the course demystifies the online distribution process and the film festival circuit, exploring the many avenues filmmakers can take to get their work shown to a wider audience.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Comfort with a video editing program and with using a video camera.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 22 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35031/2021

DGMD S-44
Introduction to 2D Animation

Jason Wiser, MFA

Creative Director, Yaya Play Games

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35028

Description
2D animation is the art of drawing to create the illusion of life, and is an extraordinary medium for storytelling and expression. In this course, students become familiar with animation principles for object and character motion, and use digital art and animation software to explore unique storytelling possibilities and create a portfolio of animation. Upon successful completion of this course, students gain an understanding of how to manipulate images and draw and color frames for animation, to show weight and expression in character and object motion, and to add animated visual effects to live footage.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Every class students need to have access to a computer and a drawing tablet (small Wacom Intuos recommended) with art and animation software installed (Photoshop, Animate, and After Effects), all of which will be taught in this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35028/2021

DGMD S-61
Working with Educational Technologies

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34722

Description
This course focuses on working with educational technologies, including learning management systems like Canvas and Moodle, self-paced learning environments like Articulate Rise and Adobe Captivate, and integrating learning tools via learning tools interoperability (LTI) and shareable content object reference models (SCORM). In this fast-paced course, students get an overview of each tool and build some simple course materials in each. By the end of the course, students are able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each tool and the best times for using each.

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of course design is helpful, but not required.

DGMD S-71
Character Design for Animation and Games

Jason Wiser, MFA

Creative Director, Yaya Play Games

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34727

Description
The design of a character connects us to the story. So much of the meaning and expressive capability of a character depend on choices of proportion, color, silhouette, and rendering style. This course explores principles of character design and development pipelines for creating expressive animation-ready characters in multiple styles. Students gain an understanding of how to design characters for animation and develop tools for solving visual problems, create a portfolio of character art in diverse styles, and take their strongest designs from 2D to 3D digital models.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Every class students need to have access to a computer and a drawing tablet (small Wacom Intuos recommended) with 2D painting software (Photoshop) and 3D software (Autodesk Maya and Mudbox) installed, both of which are taught in this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34727/2021

DGMD S-598
Digital Media Design Precapstone Tutorial

Hongming Wang, PhD

Senior Research Advisor, Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34210

Description
This tutorial helps students develop an academically strong capstone proposal. It is mandatory for candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, digital media design, who wish to register for the DGMD E-599 Capstone Design Studio at the Harvard Extension School for the fall 2021 term. The tutorial guides students to identify a topic from a variety of industries and communities, review the literature, formulate a research question, and develop appropriate methods to answer the question. The tutorial is not a course. It is structured advising, one-on-one with the instructor. Through this guidance, students declare their intent to complete the capstone in the subsequent term, while spending the current term developing their research topic and design. By completing online assignments and submitting capstone proposal drafts to the instructor, as well as participating in 15- to 30-minute individual appointments (by phone, video-conference, or in-person, ordinarily held during the day, 9 am-5 pm), students conceptualize, plan, develop, and finalize a capstone proposal. Successful completion of each activity in the tutorial ensures that their project is fully operational by the start of next semester’s capstone course.

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $0

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. This tutorial involves e-mail, phone and/or Zoom one-on-one advising sessions with the instructor with the goal of producing an approved capstone proposal by the end of the semester.

Prerequisites: Students must officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), digital media design and in their penultimate semester. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and in the process of successfully completing all degree requirements, except the capstone. Candidates should review the capstone timeline and capstone website. Once reviewed, they should follow the timeline directions and submit the mandatory prework to ALMcapstones@extension.harvard.edu between March 1 and May 15. Prework requires revisions and must be approved by the research advisor. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements or do not have their prework approved are dropped from the tutorial.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34210/2021

DRAM S-10
Introduction to Acting

John Kuntz, MA

Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30038

Description
This course concentrates on the development of imagination, observation, focus of attention, and the effective use of materials drawn from life. Students work on acting scenes, which include an approach to textual analysis, as well as practice in communication, personal involvements, and the accomplishment of stage tasks. Class work includes extensive individual coaching and ensemble work.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30038/2021

DRAM S-11
Acting Workshop: Developing a Character

Ryan Scott McKittrick, MFA

Director of Artistic Programs and Dramaturg, American Repertory Theater, Harvard University

Adrianne Krstansky, MFA

Professor of Theater Arts, Brandeis University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30039

Description
This course helps students develop a dramatic character through textual analysis and scene work from plays by Anton Chekhov, Tennessee Williams, and others. Through a variety of exercises, improvisations, and scene work, students develop a personal understanding of playing an action, pursuing an objective, working against obstacles, being in the moment, and other fundamentals of acting. By experiencing dramatic situations through the lens of another’s point of view, students grow in their capacity to change, feel empathy, and partake positively in conflict, empowering themselves to enter into unfamiliar situations.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30039/2021

DRAM S-21
Improvisational Acting

John Kuntz, MA

Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32212

Description
This course is designed not only for students of the theater, but also for those with an interest in politics and debate, public speaking, trial law, and education, as well as a broad range of other careers. Students explore various improvisational techniques that fuse intellect, humor, imagination, voice, and body.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32212/2021

DRAM S-22
Directing

Marcus Stern, MFA

Associate Director, Pedagogical Programs, and Lecturer on Theater, Dance and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30043

Description
This is a directing course for storytelling and some of the various forms it can take. This course is for directors interested in directing theater, television, and film, as well as for anyone who just may be interested in learning about directorial storytelling. The course accommodates all levels of directing, from beginners with no experience to advanced directors who are interested in making a career of directing. The emphasis is on telling stories that are of personal interest to you, defining your story points and desired visceral impact, and learning techniques to help you accomplish your vision. Through the constant creation of scenes and other short-form storytelling work, students examine how to work with actors, stage stories for clarity and impact, and learn how to use light and sound to help tell those stories. Students also study directors who are working in a variety of innovative styles. Students are asked to use free basic video editing software for part of their work, but no previous video experience is necessary. A central focus of the course is on how a director’s personal experiences and passions can creatively and concretely shape their storytelling.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30043/2021

DRAM S-24
Performing Musical Theater

Pamela J. Murray, MusM

Performing Faculty, Boston College and Middlesex School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31956

Description
In this course, which is open to all levels, students explore how to create a polished and convincing solo song performance. Each class meeting begins with a vocal warmup, reviewing the basics of good singing technique and ear training. Through individual work, we approach each song from a vocal, musical, and dramatic standpoint, discussing character, story, and presentation. Students delve deeply into the song texts by working them as monologues, learn vocal techniques that strengthen their song performance, and study the musical score and how it enhances the lyrics. The final consists of a polished presentation of each student’s song, using all the elements explored throughout the term, and a brief report of the song, show, composer, and lyricist.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Willingness to sing in front of the class.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31956/2021

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Remo Airaldi, AB

Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32763 | Section 2

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32763/2021

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Remo Airaldi, AB

Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32727 | Section 1

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32727/2021

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Remo Airaldi, AB

Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33708 | Section 3

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33708/2021

DRAM S-145
Vocal Production

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33863

Description
This is a practical, experiential, and studio-based course designed for students who wish to explore voice, speech, and text analysis for theater, film, TV, or public speaking. Actors, business professionals, singers, or anyone desiring greater mastery of the voice benefit from the course. Emphasis is placed on helping each speaker find his or her own voice through developing personal specificity, precision, and storytelling ability. Students develop a deeper awareness of their physical and vocal habits; learn how to healthfully and sustainably use their voice; and learn tools to create variety and dynamics when speaking. Class activities include solo and partner exercises to enhance awareness of the body and muscles used for voice and speech. Prior singing, acting, or speech experience is not required. Students who speak English as a second language, or have speech delays or difficulties, are encouraged to take the course (see English Proficiency Requirement).

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33863/2021

DRAM S-149
Latinx Movement

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35106

Description
Vamos a bailar! A warm invitation to get up, connect with our bodies, and move together in a virtual community. This course rigorously explores the social and communal Latin diaspora of movement, migration, and music from Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, and the United States. We learn from the salsa/mambo, bachata, cumbia, cha-cha, and more. Together we investigate and deepen our use of horizontal and vertical weight, isolations, polycentric movements, and hip whining techniques. We weave a survey of the history, art, and literature of the Latinx experience through an embodied experience. We embrace deeper states of power, awareness, and energetic alignment during movement rituals for heightened connectivity, and restorative power.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35106/2021

DRAM S-181
Street Dance Activism

Shamell Bell, PhD

Lecturer on Theater, Dance and Media, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35140

Description
This performance-based course explores the creation and implementation of street dance activism as an expression and means of bodily healing, spiritual transcendence, and critical engagement with Black liberation struggles past, present, and future. Participating in the global dance meditation for Black liberation—which features embodied meditation and movement sessions led by Black, indigenous, people of color, and queer guides from multiple wisdom traditions and healing practices—students explore various healing modalities and somatic approaches, grassroots storytelling, and modes of resistance. Students are encouraged to draw on their own personal stories and experiences as they connect to the goals and themes of the course, which culminates with a community gathering that features short documentaries of student group projects. All students are welcome; no previous dance experience is required.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

EALC S-33
East Asian Religions: Traditions and Transformations

James Robson, PhD

James C. Kralik and Yunli Lou Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35138

Description
This course provides an introduction to the study of East Asian religions. It covers the development of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. It is not a comprehensive survey, but is designed around major conceptual themes, such as ritual, image veneration, mysticism, meditation, death, and category formation in the study of religion. The emphasis throughout the course is on the hermeneutic difficulties attendant upon the study of religion in general, and East Asian religions in particular.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35138/2021

ECON S-10A
Principles of Economics: Microeconomics

Hossein S. Kazemi, PhD

Professor of Economics, Stonehill College and Part Time Professor of Economics, Boston College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30056

Description
This course offers an introduction to the market system, emphasizing economic interactions among individuals, business firms, and government. Topics include supply and demand, economic decision making, social efficiency, perfect and imperfect competition, labor markets, capital markets, and market failures. Issues such as the environment, taxation, and income distribution are addressed. This course is equivalent to the first half of ECON S-10ab.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections for undergraduate-credit students Mondays and Wednesdays, noon-1 pm; 1-2 pm; or 6:30-7:30 pm; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2-3 pm or 3-4 pm. Required sections for graduate-credit students Mondays and Wednesdays 7:30-8:30 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and geometry.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 110 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30056/2021

ECON S-10AB
Principles of Economics

Bruce D. Watson, MA

Master Lecturer in Economics, Boston University and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Jason L. Furman, PhD

Aetna Professor of the Practice of Economic Policy, Harvard Uniiversity

David Laibson, PhD

Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics, Harvard University

John A. List, PhD

Kenneth C. Griffin Distinguished Service Professor in Economics and the College, University of Chicago

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30057

Description
This course covers both micro- and macroeconomics. The microeconomic subjects studied include the workings of the market mechanisms—how supply and demand determine the quantities and prices of goods and factors of production and international trade, and how quantities and prices are affected by government intervention. The macroeconomic subjects include the determinants of economic growth, financial institutions, short-run fluctuations in output and employment, inflation, macroeconomics of the open economy, and the role of government policy.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and geometry.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30057/2021

ECON S-10B
Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics

Tanseli Savaser, PhD

Assistant Professor of Economics, Vassar College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30058

Description
This introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy emphasizes the overall performance of the national economy. Topics include economic growth, financial markets, and the causes and consequences of short-term movements in gross domestic product, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, the budget deficit, and the trade deficit. The course also covers key policy-making institutions, such as the Federal Reserve, and controversies over the proper role of government in stabilizing the economy.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and geometry.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 51 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30058/2021

ECON S-110
Quantitative Methods in Economics and Business

Sacha Gelfer, PhD

Assistant Professor of Economics, Bentley University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33002

Description
This course covers the main mathematical tools used in economics, finance, and quantitative business decision making. The course focuses on teaching and solving optimization problems faced in modern economics, finance, and business studies. Topics include constrained and unconstrained optimization, contemporary and practical techniques of calculus and probability in economic evaluation, and business decision making. All topics in this course are taught using currently available, efficient tools and packages of economics and management sciences.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of basic differential calculus of one variable is assumed. ECON S-10ab or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33002/2021

ECON S-190
Introduction to Financial and Managerial Economics

James E. Owers, PhD

Professor of Finance, Emeritus, J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University

Can Erbil, PhD

Professor of the Practice, Department of Economics, Boston College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30298

Description
This course integrates financial economics concepts and their application in making financial decisions for organizations. Students examine the practices and perspectives of financial management, with reference to the foundations of modern finance: economics, managerial organization, and accounting. The course builds conceptual, analytical, and quantitative skills in several topic areas: financial condition and performance, financial planning and control, working capital management, long-term asset decisions based on the critical concept of net present value (NPV), and financial and capital structure. It introduces the concepts and processes of behavioral economics, financial engineering, innovation, and restructuring. The roles of economic value added (EVA) and the balanced scorecard concept in developing managerial strategies and incentive structures are also discussed. While it is not a course in personal finance, many of the concepts and techniques lend themselves to both the management of formal organizations, and the lifetime management of personal finances.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30298/2021

ECON S-192
Introduction to Capital Markets and Investments

Aleksandar Tomic, PhD

Associate Dean for Strategy, Innovation, and Technology and Program Director of Master of Science in Applied Economics, Woods College of Advancing Studies, Boston College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32419

Description
Capital markets play a critical role in the economy, that of allocating surplus savings to their productive use. As a consequence, a vast array of financial instruments have been created to accommodate different investors’ objectives and risk preferences. In this introductory course, students focus on resolving two major issues: asset allocation and security selection. To do this effectively, students learn about major financial markets, financial instruments and institutions, portfolio theory, risk-return relationship, security analysis, use of futures, and options both for hedging and speculation and diversification, including international diversification. These topics are handled at the introductory level, enabling students to take first steps toward building portfolios for themselves and/or their clients should they choose to pursue a career in financial services.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab, MGMT E-2000, or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32419/2021

ECON S-1005
Foundations of Real-World Economics

John Komlos, PhD

Professor of Economics, Emeritus, University of Munich

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33373

Description
The course concentrates on complex economic processes in straightforward terms so that they can be understood without the use of mathematics. The course includes concepts from microeconomics and macroeconomics, but the focus is on real-world applications of economics without relying excessively on assumptions, theorizing, and abstract models. We apply the concepts we learn to contemporary controversial topics such as minimum wage legislation, the function of unions, and why healthcare is excessively expensive. We explore why Nobel Prize winning economists such as Paul Krugman and Joe Stiglitz are so critical of the contemporary economy’s dizzying inequality, its endemic underemployment, enormous trade and government deficits, lagging wages, and inability to provide a decent life for millions. Mainstream economists do not have the answers to the challenges of globalization, technological unemployment, and racial disparities, because they are unable to think creatively about new institutional structures that would enable us to transition to a full-employment, high quality-of-life economy. In contrast, this course weaves ideas from psychology, sociology, and political science into a common-sense economic perspective in order to explore these issues. We also assess our current economic situation, including the analysis of the COVID-19 recession.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33373/2021

ECON S-1010
Microeconomic Theory

Robert Neugeboren, PhD

Lecturer on Economics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34831 | Section 1

Description
This course presents the basic analytical tools of microeconomics. We start by looking at the decision making of individual consumers and ask how these decisions can be optimized, or improved. Next, we look at how firms make and coordinate their decisions under varying market structures, including perfect competition and monopoly. Then we look at strategic behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, making use of concepts from game theory such as Nash equilibrium. Finally, we take up topics including bargaining theory, information economics, externalities, public goods, and welfare analysis. Students learn the key tools and principles economists apply to understand a wide range of phenomena, using graphical representations, some math, and plain logic to present the important ideas and solve basic microeconomic problems.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: First year course in microeconomics ECON S-10a or equivalent; Single-variable calculus MATH S-1a or equivalent; also pass proficiency examination.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34831/2021

ECON S-1010
Microeconomic Theory

Robert Neugeboren, PhD

Lecturer on Economics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30344 | Section 2

Description
This course presents the basic analytical tools of microeconomics. We start by looking at the decision making of individual consumers and ask how these decisions can be optimized, or improved. Next, we look at how firms make and coordinate their decisions under varying market structures, including perfect competition and monopoly. Then we look at strategic behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, making use of concepts from game theory such as Nash equilibrium. Finally, we take up topics including bargaining theory, information economics, externalities, public goods, and welfare analysis. Students learn the key tools and principles economists apply to understand a wide range of phenomena, using graphical representations, some math, and plain logic to present the important ideas and solve basic microeconomic problems.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. First year course in microeconomics ECON S-10a or equivalent; Single-variable calculus MATH S-1a or equivalent; also pass proficiency examination.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30344/2021

ECON S-1012
Macroeconomic Theory

Thomas H. Baranga, PhD

Lecturer and Concentration Advisor in Economics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30345

Description
This course provides an overview of macroeconomic theory and the role and effects of governmental macroeconomic policy. We apply these ideas to understand some of the current debates about the US macroeconomy, such as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and possible policy responses to it. We discuss different and competing theories, try to understand what is at stake in the debate between rival schools of thought, and examine data to evaluate their relative merits. The first half of the course studies the long-run behavior of the macroeconomy (such as gross domestic product [GDP] and its growth, the role of financial and labor markets, and the open economy). The second half studies business cycle fluctuations in general and the policy responses to the current COVID-19 pandemic in particular.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a, ECON S-10b, and MATH S-1a, or equivalent courses.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30345/2021

ECON S-1016
Labor Economics

Gregory A. Bruich, PhD

Lecturer and Concentration Advisor in Economics, Harvard University, and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33880

Description
This course introduces students to the field of labor economics, with an emphasis on current policy issues and new research. Issues discussed include the effects of minimum wages, mandated benefits, immigration, taxes, and transfer programs on wages and employment; human capital and the labor market returns to education; measurement of the value added of teachers and colleges; the effect of unemployment insurance on unemployment durations; the effect of disability insurance on labor force participation; new evidence on income, wage, and wealth inequality and intergenerational mobility. Students learn current econometric and theoretical methods used in applied microeconomics and how to write about and apply these methods in their own research.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33880/2021

ECON S-1040
Game Theory and Strategic Decisions

Patrick Scholten, PhD

Professor of Economics, Bentley University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35033

Description
Game theory is a set of tools designed to study multiple strategic agents in many different environments. The scenarios involve interactions where the payoff of one agent, Agent A, depends on both Agent A’s actions and the actions taken by other agents in the game. The objective in this course is to introduce students to the basic game theory concepts and apply these tools to more fully understand economic interactions. This course explores game theoretic topics such as pure- and mixed-strategy Nash equilibria of strategic-form games with perfect information, Nash and subgame-perfect equilibria for extensive-form games with perfect information, perfect Bayesian equilibria for games with imperfect information, Nash equilibrium of extensive-form games with imperfect information, equilibria concepts of finitely and infinitely repeated games, and bargaining games.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab, MATH S-1A, and MATH E-8, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35033/2021

ECON S-1123
Introduction to Econometrics

Gustavo Vicentini, PhD

Associate Teaching Professor of Economics, Northeastern University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31837

Description
This course is an introduction to multiple regression methods for analyzing data in economics and related fields. Students learn how to conduct empirical studies, as well as how to analyze and interpret results from other empirical works. The emphasis is on gaining an intuitive understanding of the principles of econometric analysis and applying them to actual data. We start with the basics of statistics, including some probability theory and basic concepts in sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Topics such as multiple regression techniques as well as issues related to departures from the standard assumptions on the error structure comprise the main subjects to be discussed. Aside from model specification and data problems, the use of additional methods such as instrumental variables, probit/logit, panel data models, and basic time series methods are also part of the course agenda.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: STAT S-100 or the equivalent; also pass proficiency examination.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31837/2021

ECON S-1300
Economics of the European Union

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35035

Description
The European Union (EU) is dealing with threats such as COVID-19, Brexit, immigration, slow growth, and long-run demographic problems. This is a critical time which requires people to have the necessary background for a deep understanding of these issues. This course provides students with a wide-ranging knowledge of the EU and the ability to analyze and discuss varied issues within the EU. We analyze workings of European economies, the Eurozone, European economic policies, and the future of the union in light of multiple crises. The course involves a wide range of topics involving the EU such as trade, immigration, macroeconomic policies, labor markets, institutions, and international finance. The goal is for students to leave the course with an in-depth understanding of how firms, governments, and economies operate in the EU.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a and ECON S-10b, or ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35035/2021

ECON S-1317
The Economics of Emerging Markets: Asia and Eastern Europe

Bruno S. Sergi, PhD

Professor of International Economics, University of Messina and Associate, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33001

Description
This course examines the present day realities and future potential of fast-emerging economies in Asia and Eastern Europe, emphasizing key macroeconomic trends, international trade, foreign direct investment, finance and banking, labor markets, and technological innovation. Case studies highlight the causal factors and limits of economic dynamics in China, India, and Russia, among others. Students independently research, write, and present studies on the nature of the rapid economic transformations and recent economic policy strategies of these countries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33001/2021

ECON S-1320
Economics of Inequality

Can Erbil, PhD

Professor of the Practice, Department of Economics, Boston College

Geoffrey Sanzenbacher, PhD

Associate Professor of the Practice in Economics, Boston College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35025

Description
This course is designed to teach the structural economic factors that result in or lead to inequality in economic outcomes and opportunity. The course offers a distinction between inequality in opportunity and inequality in outcomes. It examines both existing and proposed policies that attempt to alleviate economic inequality.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a and ECON S-1123, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35025/2021

ECON S-1390
Development Economics

Umit Ozlale, PhD

Professor of Economics, Ozyegin University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34160

Description
An introduction to the field and tools of development economics, exploring salient theoretical and policy debates and assessing examples of alternative development strategies. Competing models of economic growth—and how to evaluate them against the experience of both developing and industrial countries—are critically examined. Students develop a working knowledge of modeling methods in development economics; gain familiarity with practical issues (such as the situation of women in developing countries, environmental concerns in development projects design and application, the roles of government and external financing in development); and learn how to evaluate development projects. Critical and analytical thinking about these topics, and understanding of how they relate to the everyday lives of the people in developing countries, constitute the course’s overall goal.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a and ECON S-10b, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34160/2021

ECON S-1412
Public Finance

Daniel W. Shoag, PhD

Consultant, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33534

Description
This course studies the interaction of governments and markets. We cover topics such as taxation, unemployment insurance, welfare programs, social security, health care, education, and regulation. The course emphasizes current policy issues and policy debates.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab.

ECON S-1452
Money, Financial Institutions, and Markets

Bruce D. Watson, MA

Master Lecturer in Economics, Boston University and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31138

Description
This course presents a moderately advanced overview of concepts and techniques in the fields of money, banking, and finance. It examines the agents, instruments, and institutions that make up the financial system of the modern economy, such as bonds, the stock market, derivatives, and the money market, including the role of banks in deposit and credit creation. Along the way, standard concepts and tools of financial analysis are covered, including the risk-return tradeoff (Sharpe ratio), the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), option pricing theory, and the efficient market hypothesis (EMH) and its alternatives.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or equivalent and MGMT S-2000 or equivalent. Introductory statistics, proficiency with ordinary college-level algebra (not linear or matrix algebra), and calculus highly desirable. An introductory finance class is essential.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31138/2021

ECON S-1476
International Corporate Governance: Economic Theory in Practice

Charles A. Moran, JD

Professor of Business Administration and Director of Financial Planning Program, State University of New York, Cobleskill

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 35130

Description
This course is designed for students interested in the controversies and challenges of corporate governance as it attempts to deal with global problems including climate change, and the economic and technologic disruption caused by COVID-19. Integrating historical developments and current practices, it examines international corporate governance topics that collectively are termed agency theory in modern finance, with a focus on issues of diversity, inclusion, and income inequality in a global economy under historic stress. The formal and informal contracts that bind together shareholders, bondholders, directors, managers, employees, suppliers, customers, and communities are explored. The collaborative efforts, as well as the potential conflicts of interest, of these various constituencies are analyzed in the context of a changing legislative and regulatory environment. This enables us to evaluate the effectiveness of how corporate objectives are determined and achieved in the United States, Great Britain, Germany, and Japan. Selected cases and readings illustrate research findings and highlight key issues in international corporate governance. Class discussions include the practical challenges of corporate decision making and the resulting costs of failures of regulation.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections Wednesdays, time to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor; ECON S-190 desirable.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35130/2021

ECON S-1534
International Finance and Macroeconomics

Thomas H. Baranga, PhD

Lecturer and Concentration Advisor in Economics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35016

Description
This course focuses on the international aspects of the macroeconomy, macroeconomic policy, and international financial flows. We start by studying the behavior and determination of the price central to cross-border transactions, the exchange rate. We study the influence of financial markets and international capital flows on the market for foreign exchange. We then develop an open economy macroeconomic model, and analyze the influence of international capital flows on output and unemployment. We study international debt, and the causes of international financial crises. We consider the trade-offs that governments face in their choice of exchange rate regime. Finally, we study how the international financial system has responded to recent global financial crises.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a and ECON S-10b, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35016/2021

ECON S-1615
Managerial Economics

Aleksandar Tomic, PhD

Associate Dean for Strategy, Innovation, and Technology and Program Director of Master of Science in Applied Economics, Woods College of Advancing Studies, Boston College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34161

Description
This course provides an overview of economic tools and analytic approaches available to the manager for business decision making. It includes such topics as pricing, forecasting, demand analysis, production and cost analysis, and macroeconomic policy as it affects the business environment. The purpose of this course is to develop an economic perspective that is appropriate for students aspiring to manage business units or entire companies in a wide variety of industries. Students may not take both ECON E-1600 and ECON S-1615 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. ECON S-10a or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34161/2021

ECON S-1665
Economics of Sustainable Development

Zinnia Mukherjee, PhD

Associate Professor of Economics, Simmons University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34469

Description
What is the relationship between economics and management of natural resources such as forests and fisheries? How do human activities affect the sustainability of global resources such as forests and oceans? What role can governments play for the sustainable management of natural resources? What roles can communities play in natural resource management and sustainable development? What role do international organizations such as the World Bank and United Nations have in promoting sustainable management of global resources and economic growth? This course is designed to explore these questions through a series of readings, exams, group discussions, and research. Students learn to use the principles of economics to understand and analyze issues related to natural resource use, sustainability, and the interrelationship between the two. They learn the fundamental theories that explain the economics of natural resource use. Students learn about the main ideas and concepts related to sustainability such as the difference between weak and strong sustainability. Through these discussions, we seek answers to questions such as: what is the relationship between economic efficiency, equity, and sustainability? What policy options do governments have to pursue sustainable development? What is the role of international trade in resource use and sustainable development?

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Prerequisites: Some microeconomics background (principles level) is helpful. Students must be comfortable with plotting linear functions and solving linear equations.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34469/2021

ECON S-1814
Urban Economics

Daniel W. Shoag, PhD

Consultant, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33152

Description
Why are some cities richer than others? What factors determine where people and companies decide to locate? This course reviews the economic forces that matter at the local level and the impact they have on state and urban policy makers.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a.

ECON S-1816
Economics of Innovation

Daniel Johnson, PhD

Professor of Economics, Colorado College

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34568

Description
This course focuses on one key nexus of questions about technological change: how and why innovation occurs, what policies and other factors encourage or discourage innovation, and how technologies develop and evolve in their early life. Using case studies and journal articles as a springboard, we learn the relevant economic concepts as they apply to the topics we cover. We are not limited to events of the computerized age, but discuss technological change from the Industrial Revolution to the present. The course brings in guest speakers (practitioners in Boston) and also teaches professional presentation skills.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

ECON S-1900
Financial Accounting

Michael Ruff, PhD

Associate Teaching Professsor, D’Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30072 | Section 2

Description
This course introduces financial accounting, which is the language of business, and the process of analyzing, recording, compiling, and reporting financial information through key financial statements. The course also analyzes key financial statement accounts and how financial statement information can inform decision making. Students can count either ECON S-1900 or MGMT S-1000 toward an Extension School degree or certificate, but not both.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30072/2021

ECON S-1900
Financial Accounting

Lloyd John De Leon Tanlu, DBA

Assistant Professor of Accounting, The Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics, Washington and Lee University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30071 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to financial accounting, its concepts, and the techniques of recording, summarizing, and reporting the flow of financial information through the entity concerned. The course offers an understanding of the information flow process and the necessary techniques for analysis and evaluation of the firm’s potential in light of historical data. Students can count either ECON S-1900 or MGMT S-1000 toward an Extension School degree or certificate, but not both.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30071/2021

ECON S-1901
Managerial Accounting

Lloyd John De Leon Tanlu, DBA

Assistant Professor of Accounting, The Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics, Washington and Lee University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30073

Description
This course introduces the principles and methods of data collection and presentation for planning and control, performance evaluation, and management decision making. It emphasizes product costing (both traditional and activity-based), cost-volume-profit analysis, operating and capital budgeting, evaluation of business operating segments, transfer pricing, and relevant costs for decision making. Students can count ECON S-1901 or the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-1600, but not both, toward an Extension School degree or certificate.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900 or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30073/2021

ECON S-1913
Behavioral Corporate Finance

Duccio Martelli, PhD

Assistant Professor of Finance, University of Perugia

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31733

Description
This course analyzes corporate finance topics through a behavioral perspective, a strand of research focusing on how managers and firms make financial decisions, and how these choices might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial theory. Compared to traditional finance, which assumes managers are rational and always make optimal decisions, behavioral finance states that individuals are in fact inclined to make psychological and cognitive mistakes. Since corporate managers usually make decisions involving millions of dollars, their behaviors have a direct impact on corporate results; therefore, behavioral finance is likely to be even more important to corporate finance than it is to investments and financial markets. For example, behavioral phenomena can cause managers to take actions that are detrimental to the interests of shareholders; simply identifying behavioral biases at the right time managers could save their firms from potential financial disaster. Applying psychological and behavioral evidence to corporate finance and financial markets, students can therefore learn how managers can avoid these biases, in order to make decisions that are more rational.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent, ECON S-190, ECON S-192, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31733/2021

ECON S-1915
Neuroinvesting: Neuroscience and Financial Decision Making

Duccio Martelli, PhD

Assistant Professor of Finance, University of Perugia

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34468

Description
The study of decision making has a long tradition, particularly in economics, where the choices of economic agents have been analyzed with the aid of a number of methodologies and theoretical models. Many academic researches and empirical evidence show how institutional and retail investors are inclined to make mistakes when making financial decisions; moreover, people do not have stable preferences, but make choices that are influenced by the context—and the feelings—in which individuals are asked to make a decision. Neuroscience methodologies applied to investments (so-called neuroinvesting) help to explain these anomalies, highlighting how investors’ brains and bodies react to different stimuli and situations. In-depth knowledge of neuroinvesting foundations is then crucial for making informed decisions and therefore better choices, which are consistent with investors’ needs and expectations. This course aims to help participants to understand practical impacts and benefits that neuroscience applied to investments has on investors’ decision-making processes. Starting from an overview about what neuroscience is and how brain activity can be measured, the course describes the underlying mechanisms related to motivations and to judgments under risk and uncertainty. The course focuses on the role of emotions and on investors’ risk perception and risk tolerance. The course ends by introducing pathological choices, ethics, and trust.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent; ECON S-190, ECON S-192, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34468/2021

ECON S-1944
History of Financial Crises, 1637 to the Present

John Komlos, PhD

Professor of Economics, Emeritus, University of Munich

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33362

Description
This course examines the 384-year history of financial crises through the great meltdown of 2008 and its aftermath, culminating in the COVID-19 pandemic catastrophe. It investigates recurring historical patterns of financial bubbles, from tulips to bitcoins, without overlooking critical differences. If history repeats itself, why is it so difficult to avoid making the same mistakes? The 2008 financial crisis happened at a time when mainstream macroeconomists (including the former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke) were emphasizing the great moderation, that is, that business cycles have vanished for all practical purposes. These economists were wrong because they disregarded warning signs and used inadequate economic models to gauge the situation. Similarly, the Trump recession occurred just at the time when pundits were boasting of a roaring economy. We also assess our current economic situation, including the bailout of Wall Street that failed to pay adequate attention to the economic problems faced by ordinary people and the ways in which those problems contributed to the rise of populism. We conclude with the analysis of the COVID-19 recession and the financial problems created in its wake.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33362/2021

ENGL S-116
Asian American Genre Fictions

Ellen Song, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35052

Description
There was an explosion of works by Asian American authors published around the turn of the millennium, an unexpected consequence of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which brought an influx of immigrants from Asia and dramatically altered the demographic composition of the US. This course examines the many different genres and forms of contemporary Asian American fiction produced by the diverse group of Asian American authors who are the descendants of these post-1965 immigrants. Asian American literature is often associated with certain themes (inter-generational conflict in families and the fraught nature of immigrant identity), but this course instead emphasizes the formal qualities of contemporary Asian American writing alongside their domestic and global historical contexts. We read works by authors including Chang-rae Lee, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Suki Kim, Ling Ma, and Nam Le, exploring their aesthetic characteristics and political investments, all while seeking to understand, from our vantage point, what it is that makes them Asian American.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35052/2021

ENGL S-117
How to Change the World

Andrew Warren, PhD

Associate of the Department of English and Co-Chair, Seminar in Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities, Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34817

Description
Writers have long imagined new worlds as a way of changing this one. As Percy Shelley said way back in 1821, creative writers are “the unacknowledged legislators of the world.” This course asks how literature depicts and intervenes in the world and models new worlds. It reads works addressing a range of pressing issues: climate and the environment; social and economic inequality; immigration; questions regarding race, gender, and sexuality. We begin with Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and end with N.K. Jemisin’s Hugo Award-winning The Fifth Season. In between we read science fiction (Ursula Le Guin and Kim Stanley Robinson), realism (James Joyce), romance (Nathaniel Hawthorne), and examples of hybrid genres such as Claudia Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34817/2021

ENGL S-139
England After Empire

Duncan E. White, DPhil

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35056

Description
This course considers the way England was transformed through the demise of its empire after the Second World War through to the advent of Brexit. From the birth of the welfare state to the rise of Thatcherism, from post-colonial migration to multicultural Britain, from the swinging sixties to punk rock and riots, we track these radical political, social, and cultural changes through novels, poetry, theater, film, pop music, photography, fashion, food, and sport. We explore the way Britain sought to retain its influence in the world, through its involvement in the cold war, its relations with the Commonwealth, and its continuing special relationship with the United States. As well as reading literary works by John Osborne, Sam Selvon, Jean Rhys, John Le Carre, Daljit Nagra, Zadie Smith, and Bernardine Evaristo, we consider British popular culture, from The Beatles to The Sex Pistols, from James Bond to J.K. Rowling.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35056/2021

ENGL S-141
The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

Leo Damrosch, PhD

Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature, Emeritus, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35000

Description
This course is a study of major eighteenth-century autobiographical, fictional, and philosophical texts that explore the paradoxes of the modern self at a time when traditional religious and philosophical explanations were breaking down. Writers to be read include Mme. de Lafayette, Boswell, Voltaire, Gibbon, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos, Franklin, and Blake. Due to the condensed summer schedule, the longer works, such as Rousseau’s Confessions and Laclos’s Les Liaisons Dangereuses, are read in abridged form.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35000/2021

ENGL S-182A
Poetry in America: From the Mayflower to Emerson

Elisa New, PhD

Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature, Harvard University

Jesse Benjamin Raber, PhD

Visiting Lecturer on English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35008

Description
This course covers American poetry in cultural context through the year 1850. The course begins with Puritan poets, some orthodox, some rebel spirits, who wrote and lived in early New England. Focusing on Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, and Michael Wigglesworth, among others, we explore the interplay between mortal and immortal, Europe and wilderness, solitude and sociality in English North America. The second part of the course spans the poetry of America’s early years, directly before and after the creation of the Republic. We examine the creation of a national identity through the lens of an emerging national literature, focusing on such poets as Phillis Wheatley, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edgar Allen Poe, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, among others. Distinguished guest discussants in this course include writer Michael Pollan, economist Larry Summers, Vice President Al Gore, Mayor Tom Menino, and others.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: this course counts for the Aesthetics and Culture Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1172. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Prerequisites: The recorded lectures are from the HarvardX Poetry in America Series.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35008/2021

ENGL S-185
Wit, Irony, and Comedy

Thomas Wisniewski, PhD

Lecturer on Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33785

Description
In literature, as in life, humor often takes us by surprise. Why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery, and literary criticism has always been more comfortable dealing with tragedy than comedy. Taking comedy seriously, this course provides a broad investigation into the myriad functions of humor (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and dramatic) and explores why what we find funny changes in relation to shifting social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics include wit and wordplay; the differences between verbal wit and visual humor; the phenomenon of laughing; satire and irony; jokes and joking; sexual humor and the taboo; humor in performance; the roles of ethnicity, race, religion, and gender in humor. Readings include literary works from Shakespeare to the present day, as well as theater history, performance, film, television, stand-up, and cartoons.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

ENGL S-207
The Culture of Capitalism

Martin Puchner, PhD

Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33124

Description
The course asks how literature, theater, and film have captured the spirit of capitalism—fueling its fantasies, contemplating its effects, and chronicling its crises. More than just an economic system, capitalism created new habits of life and mind; it also created new values, forged and distilled by new forms of art. Core readings by Franklin, O’Neill, Rand, Miller, and Mamet, films by Chaplin and Lang, and background readings by Smith, Marx, Taylor, Weber, and Schumpeter.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-1:30 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Please note: In addition to the scheduled class time, this course has required recorded lectures and activities that students complete on demand. Please see course syllabus for details. The overall amount of time students spend on this course is equivalent to other 4-credit courses.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33124/2021

ENGL S-233
The Literature of Abolition

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35038

Description
This course traces connections and divergences between nineteenth-century anti-slavery abolitionist writing and contemporary police and prison abolitionism. What does it mean to abolish systems that are core components of an economic or legal system? How might we understand the relationship between reforming and transforming broad, societal structures like chattel enslavement and mass incarceration? How have artists, activists, community organizers, and elected officials engaged with questions of abolition in their work, whether it is facing the public or behind closed doors? And how have those people who have been most deeply affected by these systems responded to them? We consider the work of authors, organizers, and scholars such as Frederick Douglass, Frances E.W. Harper, Harriet Jacobs, James McCune Smith, Maria W. Stewart, Harriet Beecher Stowe, David Walker, James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, Angela Davis, W.E.B. Du Bois, Mariame Kaba, and Danez Smith, among others.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35038/2021

ENGL S-241
Drawing Asia/America in Graphic Novels

Catherine H. Nguyen, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35076

Description
The course explores Asian American literature by focusing on the genre and form of comics and graphic novels. Through these illustrative and textual works, we explore the Asian American experience of immigration and racial difference as well as the construction of Asian American identity and representation through such works as Adrian Tomine’s Shortcomings and Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do. The course also considers the transnational and global literature of Asian American graphic novels from other sites of Asian migration and diaspora, including Vietnamese-Australian Matt Huynh’s The Boat and Korean-Belgian adoptee Jung’s Couleur de peau: miel. As such, this course seeks to examine literary works and cultural productions in the form of comics and graphic novels that engage with and articulate the Asian American experience as well as the sense of being Asian in the world.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35076/2021

ENGL S-243
The American Road Narrative

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34848

Description
This course examines the American road narrative, beginning with Jack Kerouac’s On the Road (1957) and extending to Valeria Luiselli’s Lost Children Archive (2019). Pairing key literary texts with reviews, essays, scholarship, journalism, and other media, it considers how the road narrative engages with historical circumstances and with social, ethical, and political themes. Students have the option to complete a creative final project, for example, an original road narrative or film adaptation of a novel.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

ENGL S-249
Summer Seminar: (Very) Contemporary American Fiction

Andrew Warren, PhD

Associate of the Department of English and Co-Chair, Seminar in Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities, Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34816

Description
This course reads some of the most vital work being done in American fiction to ask how we today experience, or want to experience, time. What kinds of temporal lags or leaps does fiction afford us? Why and whence this obsession with the now? How are questions of identity knitted to our histories, present circumstances, and hopes for the future? Each book is paired with a review or critical essay. Students complete a creative project exploring their own experience of time, both in the course and out. Authors may include Ocean Vuong, Jenny Offill, Celeste Ng, Paul Beatty, Valeria Luiselli, and others.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. See the Summer Seminars page for more information on this class.

Prerequisites: Close reading and paper writing skills.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34816/2021

ENGL S-257
Superheroes and Power

Stephanie Burt, PhD

Professor of English, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35152

Description
What makes superheroes popular? How can they help us think about power, belonging, queerness, race, citizenship, art, or disability? In this course we explore those questions in Marvel and DC favorites (especially the X-Men) as well as in older literature, independent comics, novels, and readings from several critical disciplines.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Aesthetics and Culture Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1165. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

ENGL S-305
Poetry in America for Teachers: Earth, Sea, Sky

Elisa New, PhD

Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature, Harvard University

Marissa Grunes, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for the Environment, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34748

Description
This course is designed specifically for secondary school educators interested in deepening their expertise as readers and teachers of literature. In the course, we consider the evolving relationship of American poets to the environment from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Emily Dickinson, whose poems on the landscape of rural Massachusetts from the 1850s to 1880s drew from the science and the incipient environmental movements of that century, is a touchstone for the course. But her sparse lyrics are only one of the poetic technologies of looking at, caring for, and mourning the destruction of the natural world that we explore together: from haiku, to African American poems of exploitative agrarianism and fantastical gardening, to poems that expand the scope of nature from the vast and inhuman to the birdcalls echoing in urban backyards. Through field trips, classroom visits, and conversations with ecologists, scientists, gardeners, farmers and other guest interpreters, this course familiarizes students with a variety of canonical and contemporary American poets: Robert Frost, Jean Toomer, Lorine Niedecker, Gary Snyder, A.R. Ammons, Robinson Jeffers, Juliana Spahr, Ross Gay, and more.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $1000
Undergraduate credit: $1000
Graduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. This course is offered in partnership with the Poetry in America (PiA) initiative. The course is also offered in partnership with the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). Teachers enrolled for noncredit who are interested in professional development can earn certificates of participation for 90 professional development hours from HGSE’s Professional Education. Teachers may apply for Poetry in America scholarships.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34748/2021

ENSC S-107
Acceptance and Resistance to Innovation

Sujata K. Bhatia, PhD, MD

Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35063

Description
This course discusses the factors that influence societal acceptance of innovations. In order for an innovation to have impact, and in order for an entrepreneur to be successful, the innovation must gain acceptance within the broader society. Why are novel technologies readily accepted in some communities, yet resisted in other communities? Students learn through case studies of technologies such as genetically modified foods, solar energy, nuclear power, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, and virtual reality. Many case studies are inspired by, but not limited to, the Grand Challenges for Engineering as identified by the National Academy of Engineering. Since the ultimate goal of technology is to improve the quality of life for all, we must be cognizant of not only the technical feasibility of our designs, but also the social impact on humanity, as well as the environmental impact on our shared planet. This course provides a framework for both engineering and non-engineering students to evaluate the societal impact of novel technologies, reason quantitatively, and formulate inclusive strategies for overcoming resistance to new innovations.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35063/2021

ENSC S-138
Introduction to Probability for Engineering and Data Science

Yue Lu, PhD

Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34796

Description
This course introduces students to probability theory and statistics, and their applications in engineering and data science. Topics include random variables, distributions and densities, conditional expectations, statistical sampling, limit theorems, and Markov chains. The goal of this course is to prepare students with knowledge of probability theory and statistical methods that are widely used in several engineering disciplines and modern data science.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: MATH S-1a and MATH S-1b, or their equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34796/2021

ENVR S-102
Design of Renewable Energy Projects

Ramon Sanchez, ScD

Research Associate, Environmental Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34438

Description
This course helps students develop the skills to design, fund, and implement renewable energy projects in the United States and around the world. It is aimed at anyone who would like to understand the relationship between energy and the environment, but is particularly helpful for energy developers and current or future professionals in the practice of renewable energy. Students learn the basics of how to design photovoltaic, wind, biomass, geothermal, small-hydro, waste water to energy, solid waste to energy, and other large scale sustainable energy operations. Students also learn about the best global practices for engaging rural and indigenous communities in renewable energy projects while maximizing economic development and social equity. They learn how to deal with other important issues like negotiating land rights for renewable energy projects, how to encourage public utilities and private corporations to sign long-term agreements for purchasing renewable energies, how to prepare project proposals for international financial institutions and private investors who fund these projects, how to estimate the basic health and environmental benefits derived from proposed renewable energy projects, how to monetize health effects of renewable energy projects, and how to quantify the social benefits of such projects in the community.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: High school math and science.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34438/2021

ENVR S-111
Marine Policy and Ocean Resource Management

Andrew Tirrell, PhD

Assistant Professor in Political Science and International Relations, University of San Diego

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33867

Description
This course is an introduction to marine policy and ocean resource management. Students engage with material focused on fisheries management, whaling, marine protected areas, off-shore drilling, and other topics of contemporary relevance, and also consider the cultural and social ties of coastal communities to ocean resources. The course both introduces students to the field of marine resources policy and the environmental and social implications of that policy domestically and internationally, and develops research skills that are broadly applicable to other policy areas. An interactive marine policy negotiation simulation is a highlight of the course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33867/2021

ENVR S-113
Political Economy of Decarbonization

Juergen Braunstein, PhD

Fellow, Geopolitics of Energy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35086

Description
Starting with the economic aspects of global decarbonization, this course examines emerging issues raised by the transition to a low carbon economy—its impact on jobs, inequality, finance, trade, mobility, and infrastructure—for citizens, societies, and nations. Choices about global decarbonization are highly contested in terms of material interests and ideologies, and they raise a set of new questions at the intersection of climate change, geo-economics, national policies, and global politics. These questions include: how does the energy transition affect the global economic order? Will a greener future lead to fewer resource conflicts around carbon resources? Is green the new gold? How does the low carbon transition affect the value of carbon assets? Is the US equipped to sustain its role as global leader in finance? How does the sustainable transition affect international trade flows? Is a carbon adjustment tax a stepping stone towards decarbonized trade? What is the prospect of green trade wars erupting?

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35086/2021

ENVR S-117
Sustainability Leadership for the Twenty-First Century

Leith Sharp, MEd

Director, Executive Education for Sustainability Leadership, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

John D. Spengler, PhD

Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33019

Description
To inspire and enable people to lead effective change towards environmental sustainability, we have created a course to enhance individual change agency skills as applied to a variety of organizational contexts (education, business, government, nonprofit, church, community). The course explores what change leadership for sustainability is, and guides students to advance their related capabilities, competencies, and strategies. The personal, interpersonal, organizational, and technical dimensions of change leadership for sustainability are addressed. A variety of specific case studies and examples of sustainability in practice, including everything from green building design and renewable energy to environmental purchasing are explored. Interdependencies between finance, politics, relationships, capacity building, technology, and more are discussed. Students leave with an experiential knowledge of change management because they are required to complete a project involving a real life change leadership project of their choice. Students typically find this project to be both deeply rewarding and central to the development of their knowledge and confidence as change managers.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33019/2021

ENVR S-125B
Reconstruction of Environmental Governance

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35161

Description
Withdrawal from international agreements, the removal of regulations, and reductions in agency staff and enforcement have become dominant developments in environmental law since 2017. A great dismantling has negatively affected the rights of recipients, the expectations of actors, the determinants of public, occupational, and environmental health, and the processes we rely on for understanding and managing the world. The result is unsustainable, and the prospect of restoration is before us. This course engages students who want to participate in establishing sensible systems to protect the public interest, remaking the world for sustainability and shaping the law so that it becomes a priority for everyone. The course examines how to nurture the development of these possibilities, with students offering their personal choices of focus to create a communal learning experience. It combines practical, historical, legal, and other information to produce a focus on common fate and shared effort. Students produce an original product focused on the kind of governance they argue we ought to have and, through class interaction, work to improve the professional value of their paper or project.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35161/2021

ENVR S-129B
Assessing the Food-Water-Energy Nexus: Foundations of Global Security

Joseph Michael Hunt, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33862

Description
Food, water, and energy (FWE) are boundary conditions for global security and sustainable development. All three resources are imperiled at a time when many living systems are declining at an accelerating rate. Our quality of life depends on designing and implementing sustainable solutions to the FWE crisis, especially as sustainable development goals (SDGs) largely depend on those solutions. This course examines the FWE nexus through interdependent analysis and the use of integrated health and economic assessment methods. The impact of climate change on the FWE security nexus is a core theme, as are the strains placed on the FWE nexus by skyrocketing global population growth and the irreversible population shift to urban centers. The course considers how natural resource planning and management paradigms have to adjust to the risks of imbalance that threaten food and water security for the poor across the globe. Both country and project case studies are used to assess the environmental impacts of investment decisions in the agriculture, water, and energy sectors. The course includes a simulation of an environmental policy problem involving food security with water and energy dimensions. The full class is involved in the simulation.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Basic background in environmental science, natural resources policy and/or development economics, with an interest in international development studies.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33862/2021

ENVR S-138
Introduction to Sustainable Finance and Investments

Carlos Alberto Vargas, PhD

Partner, Turnstone Environmental Planning

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33151

Description
Financial decisions worldwide are increasingly influenced by the scarcity of resources, the search for profits through efficiency, and climate change. The Dow Jones has a sustainability index and the search for profitability through efficiency has transcended trend, becoming the new corporate norm. This course studies finance and sustainability as integrated subjects beginning with an introduction of financial and investment principles and moving through financial analysis, financing, and valuation. The course covers diverse aspects of sustainable investments and offers tools for effective financial valuation and risk assessment.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33151/2021

ENVR S-142A
The Amazon Rainforest: From Conservation to Climate Change

Mark J. Plotkin, PhD

Co-Founder and President, Amazon Conservation Team

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34736

Description
The Amazon is a land of superlatives. It is home to the world’s largest river, flowing though the world’s largest rainforest, and home to the world’s largest snake, spider, catfish, rodent, anteater, armadillo, and alligator species. It is also home to approximately 390 billion trees and plays a vital role in stabilizing the global climate cycle. Yet it is a threatened world, as people both within and without the region are eager to extract its riches. This course examines the past, present, and likely future of Amazonia, from the first pre-Columbian settlers over 10,000 years ago, to the 70 remaining uncontacted tribes; and evaluates present threats (such as fires, cattle, and mining) and possibilities of sustainable development (such as ecotourism and non-timber forest products).

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Basic course in biology.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34736/2021

ENVR S-147
International Environmental Governance, Policy, and Social Justice

Andrew Tirrell, PhD

Assistant Professor in Political Science and International Relations, University of San Diego

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33398

Description
This course examines both the policy decisions and social justice issues that drive human actions and responses to environmental challenges. We begin by exploring three foundational topics: environmental governance, the global commons, and natural resource valuation. Core concepts from these sessions will continue to arise as we progress into classes focused on particular sectors of environmental policy, such as climate change, sustainable development, energy, and conservation. Upon completion of the course, students are prepared to engage with issues from a wide range of environmental policy areas that touch upon a number of social justice dilemmas. In addition, they further develop the analytic, rhetorical, written, and negotiation skills that are essential to environmental policy and advocacy careers.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33398/2021

ENVR S-148
Environmental Crises and Systems Collapse: Lessons on the Importance of Resilience and Adaptation

James J. Truncer, PhD

Special Education Tutor, Concord-Carlisle High School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33511

Description
Present-day environmental crises are examined from an historical and analytical perspective—investigating the contexts of these developing crises by exploring how past societies adapted, or failed to adapt, to changing environmental conditions. Only certain aspects of these developing environmental crises are completely under human control. As we begin to understand how the components of these crises arise, function, and interact, our control over them is likely to increase. Part of this understanding must come from a consideration of the origin and development of these crises. Studying how earlier societies grappled with environmental crises of their own provides important developmental contexts for our problems and useful lessons on the importance of resilience and adaptation. Students may not count both ANTH S-1060 (offered previously) and ENVR S-148 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33511/2021

ENVR S-154
Sustainable Product Design and the Innovation Ecosystem

Ramon Sanchez, ScD

Research Associate, Environmental Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33169

Description
This course is for anyone who would like to learn how to design and launch a new product with the lowest environmental footprint. Some of the knowledge, tools, and skills that students acquire in this course are how to do market intelligence (technological benchmarking and reverse engineering), how to incorporate real sustainability into new products (and identify green washing), how to use structured tools to enhance creativity and innovation to conceive and develop new products, how to design and implement a new product introduction process, how to write and submit a patent application to decrease legal costs, how to protect copyrights and trademarks, how to fund intellectual property by using funds from business incubators and accelerators, how to select the right materials and processes to minimize the product’s environmental impacts (using green chemistry principles, sustainable sourcing of components, sustainable certification for raw materials to promote conservation), how to reduce energy use by new products, how to build and test prototypes in an inexpensive way, and how to reduce the environmental impacts of packaging and transportation. Students also learn the basic components of an innovation ecosystem and how high technology hubs (Silicon Valley, Boston, New York) work.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Basic math at a high school level.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33169/2021

ENVR S-156
Environmental Justice Practice

Lindi Dorothee von Mutius, JD

Director, Board Operations and Strategy, The Trust for Public Land

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35143

Description
This course surveys a range of US and international environmental justice projects in traditionally marginalized communities, exploring why some projects fail to have a lasting impact and others succeed. The course gives students a chance to understand how scientists, sustainability policy experts, lawyers, and grassroots activists working in environmental justice apply their expertise to solving some of our planet’s most challenging issues. In each case study, students learn about the environmental problem, and the laws, policy, economics, and science that make the problem challenging to solve. Students hear from experts who are doing the work—from groundwater conservation in California’s central valley, to fighting coal pollution in Puerto Rico, to creating sustainable fisheries in the Philippines—and how they have engaged communities and stakeholders to make these projects succeed. The course also provides an overview of how large and small nonprofits, government agencies, and companies, partner to achieve successful outcomes. At the end of the semester, students have a chance to work on a project, create a stakeholder engagement plan, and apply the best practices learned throughout the semester. This course gives students experiential knowledge of managing a sustainability project with many diverse stakeholders who have competing interests, but common goals.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35143/2021

ENVR S-158E
Sustainable Fashion

Kelly A. Burton, ALM

Chief Executive Officer, Kate Black & Co.

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34737

Description
The global fashion and apparel industry has changed dramatically in the last 20 years to become an industry that today produces between six and ten percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. This course explores the historical, social, and environmental aspects of the global fashion industry and the current tools and methodologies available to improve it. It enables students to understand the connection between sustainable development and the apparel industry; think critically about both the common and less discussed aspects of the apparel industry, including consumption, durability, and sustainable design; appreciate the complexities of the economic impacts of externalities both positive and negative on the industry; and explore the social and environmental impacts and the tools available to monitor and measure positive impact.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34737/2021

ENVR S-161
Environmental Economics

Jennifer Clifford, PhD

Lecturer in Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston and Partner, Turnstone Environmental Planning

Carlos Alberto Vargas, PhD

Partner, Turnstone Environmental Planning

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34741

Description
This course surveys the most critical topics in environmental economics. Economics, the science of how scarce resources are allocated, is at the core of our most challenging environmental issues. In a world of increasing scarcity and competing demands, economic analysis can guide public policy to efficient use of resources. Market failures are at the root of many of our most serious environmental problems. Remedies include getting prices to reflect true costs, providing productive incentive structures, and explicitly valuing environmental amenities. Topics covered in this course include the economics of population growth, poverty and income distribution, market failures, economic valuation, economic incentive instruments, food and water resources, international agricultural markets, fisheries, and wildlife conservation.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34741/2021

ENVR S-162
Law for Sustainability

Rick Reibstein, JD

Lecturer in Earth & Environment, Institute for Sustainable Energy, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33295

Description
This course provides an overview of the major environmental statutes and the common and constitutional law that are relevant to the achievement of environmentally sustainable societies. The primary example is US environmental law, but lessons are also drawn from other parts of the world and transnational efforts. Students examine how we can use law to develop a cleaner, safer world, and more stable economies that protect natural beauty and the resources our descendants will need. The course provides an introduction to the broad extent of existing law, and explores how to make it more efficient and effective.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33295/2021

ENVR S-171
Water, Health, and Sustainable Development

Joseph Michael Hunt, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33522

Description
According to Fortune, “water promises to be to the twenty-first century what oil was to the twentieth century: the precious commodity that determines the wealth of nations.” And the health of nations as well. This course introduces students to environmental assessment methods of water projects and programs, including health impact assessment, that contribute significantly to health protection and environmental sustainability. The course takes three approaches to the water question. The first, with case studies drawn from South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, targets the new sustainable development goal of water supply and sanitation (WSS) for all. The second studies women, watersheds, and the welfare of children, and looks at climate change, persistent drought, and the reclamation of river basins for meeting human needs. The third involves water planning, technology, and management for healthy cities. Harvard’s extensive policy and planning research on China’s healthy cities initiative is also an area of focus. At course end, students apply practical methods that inform prudent investment decisions on water security and safety, and describe evidence-based water planning paradigms that support economic growth, social and health development, and environmental sustainability. The course includes a simulation of a major and controversial water policy problem that all students participate in solving.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33522/2021

ENVR S-173
Sustainable Development Practice: Creating a Livable World

Laurence Simon, PhD

Professor of International Development and Director, Center for Global Development and Sustainability, Brandeis University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33646

Description
The world has made progress in reducing extreme poverty and non-communicable disease. Yet our economic growth model both in rich and poor nations has created a global climate crisis. The course explores the promise of sustainable development that integrates natural and social science concerns, and reviews failures of sustainability that have at times increased landlessness, disease, hunger, pollution, and social disintegration. We examine principles and best practices in development and learn underlying concepts in population dynamics, poverty reduction, public health, and technology innovation to meet critical needs in energy and food security. Case studies help us learn the importance of methods for planning, monitoring, and evaluation. Students are introduced to the institutional landscape for development assistance including multilateral agencies such as the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the New Development Bank; bilateral agencies as the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA); nongovernmental organizations as Oxfam and BRAC; and local civil society groups. The course aims to benefit students seeking a foundation in development as well as those wishing to enhance skills in policy advocacy. Overall, we consider the ethics of development practice that must guide our interactions and interventions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33646/2021

ENVR S-176
The Economics of Ecosystem Services

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34733

Description
This course focuses on understanding the economic approach to studying services provided by various ecosystems that improve human well-being. With the help of the definitions offered in the academic literature and several examples from the real world, we develop an understanding of what we mean by ecosystem services. The course provides a brief overview of the economic theory that illustrates the links between different ecosystems and the economy. We learn about the different classifications of ecosystem services in relationship to economic decision making, and about the major framework adopted in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, which can be used to study the impact of the human race on the global ecosystem. We study the various methods used in the non-market valuation of ecosystem services and focus on the practical advantages and limitations of each method. Toward the end of the course, we focus on developing a thorough understanding of the role of various governments and market institutions in influencing the efficient delivery of ecosystem services worldwide.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34733/2021

ENVR S-238
Sustainability and Impact Investments

Carlos Alberto Vargas, PhD

Partner, Turnstone Environmental Planning

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34437

Description
Do environment, social, and governance (ESG) criteria influence a firm’s financial performance, and if so, how? What are impact investments and how should they be assessed? Sustainable finance has evolved and is now a relevant topic in the global finance agenda. This course studies this evolution from the perspective of sustainability investments and impact investments. We cover among other topics ESG criteria, multi-stakeholders’ perspectives, green bonds, sustainable asset management, sustainable development goals (SDG) investments, and impact investments.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENVR E-138 or ENVR S-138, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34437/2021

ENVR S-496
Crafting the Thesis Proposal in Sustainability

Mark Leighton, PhD

Associate Director and Senior Research Advisor, Sustainability, Harvard Extension School

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34137

Description
This course helps students develop critical thinking, scholarly writing skills, and research abilities while developing their individual thesis proposals. Class meetings feature lectures and discussions on different scientific approaches, group discussions, and intensive, constructive discussion of proposed student thesis research projects and proposals, from definition of research goals and hypotheses through research design and expected data analysis and presentation. Students should not register for this course unless they are ready to engage in the entire thesis process. They should consider if this is the right time to start independent research, as the goal of the course is to move from crafting the thesis proposal to thesis registration with no extended breaks. Students should begin the thesis project during the next semester or two after completing this course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Final paper due Monday, August 2.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, sustainability. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing. If in the 12-course thesis track, candidates must have completed at least eight degree-applicable courses with required grades and earned a B- or higher in a research methods course. If in the ten-course thesis track, candidates must have completed at least six degree-applicable courses with required grades and a research methods course is recommended. Candidates submit their mandatory prework between February 1 and March 1 to thesis_prework@extension.harvard.edu. Prework requires revisions and must be approved by the research advisor. If approved, permission to register will be sent via email from the ALM Advising Office by May 15. Candidates who do not meet the these degree requirements or do not have their prework approved are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34137/2021

ENVR S-598
Sustainability Precapstone Tutorial

Richard Wetzler, PhD

Research Advisor, Sustainability, Harvard Extension School

Mark Leighton, PhD

Associate Director and Senior Research Advisor, Sustainability, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34202

Description
This tutorial helps students develop an academically strong capstone proposal. It is mandatory for candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability who wish to register for the ENVR E-599 capstone in fall 2021. The tutorial provides an essential ramp to the capstone course, mapping critical issues of research design (for example, scope, methodology, metrics for evaluating impact, and benchmarking) and allows the capstone course to begin with projects fully operational.

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $0

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. This tutorial involves e-mail, phone and/or Zoom one-on-one advising sessions with the instructor with the goal of producing an approved capstone proposal by the end of the semester.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability and in their penultimate semester. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and in the process of successfully completing all degree requirements except the capstone. Candidates submit their prework to ALMcapstones@extension.harvard.edu between March 1 and May 15. Prework requires revisions and must be approved by the research advisor. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements or do not have their prework approved are dropped from the tutorial. To obtain mandatory prework instructions, visit the capstone website.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34202/2021

ENVR S-598A
Consulting for Sustainability Precapstone Tutorial

William O’Brien, MBA, JD

Professor of Practice, School of Management, Clark University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34527

Description
This tutorial helps students develop an academically strong capstone proposal. It is mandatory for candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability who wish to register for ENVR E-599a at the Harvard Extension School for the following fall term. The tutorial begins with a mandatory webinar and covers critical issues in designing a sustainability action plan (SAP).

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $0

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. This tutorial involves e-mail, phone and/or Zoom one-on-one advising sessions with the instructor with the goal of producing an approved capstone proposal by the end of the semester.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability and in their penultimate semester. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and in the process of successfully completing all degree requirements except the capstone. Candidates submit the prework to ALMcapstones@extension.harvard.edu between March 1 and May 15. Prework requires revisions and must be approved by the research advisor. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements or do not have their prework approved are dropped from the tutorial. To obtain mandatory prework instructions, visit the capstone website.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34527/2021

ENVR S-599
Independent Research Capstone

Richard Wetzler, PhD

Research Advisor, Sustainability, Harvard Extension School

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 32381

Description
This course catalyzes the thinking, designing, implementing, writing, and speaking essential to successful research projects. Participants receive guided immersion in processes of heuristic question formulation, hypothesis testing, data collection and analysis, writing, and final dissemination. Individual meetings with the course instructor throughout the semester begin with the preliminary research proposal and a needs assessment. Subsequent meetings ensure research progress is on track and make full use of available experts, references, and other resources. Lectures and discussions explore challenges and opportunities in boundary delineation, project scoping, assessment of potential impact, inclusion of stakeholders, and sampling design; logical consistency, lateral thinking, use and analysis of case studies; benchmarking, bet-hedging; effective writing, graphic presentation and referencing; public presentation and network establishment. In recurring workshops, participants regularly present their work-in-progress for review and constructive input. At the course’s close, the university community is invited to attend participants’ final research project presentations via a live, web-based symposium, including responses from faculty panelists and online audience.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional modules to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Final paper/project due Friday, August 20.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability. Candidates must be in good academic standing, in their final semester, and have successfully completed all other degree requirements, including the Harvard Extension School precapstone tutorial, ENVR E-598, in the 2021 spring term.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33281/2021

ENVR S-599A
Consulting for Sustainability Capstone

William O’Brien, MBA, JD

Professor of Practice, School of Management, Clark University

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33324

Description
This course is designed for Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability candidates. The course imparts knowledge and enhances skills for planning sustainability projects and developing solutions for organizations of at least 50 employees. Appropriate clients may include corporations, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), municipal/state/provincial governments, primary and secondary schools, universities, hospitals, health centers, and regional development agencies. Sustainability solutions refers to working with a client to develop and deliver a customized sustainability action plan (SAP). Common client goals include reduction of operating costs, minimization of the environmental footprint, brand differentiation, and improvement of environmental sustainability practices. Opportunities are identified and initiatives developed in collaboration with the client for both short and long term. Typical areas of focus include energy efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, supply chain management, green IT, and transportation. In support of recommended initiatives, SAPs emphasize a process to foster sustainable behavior, outline key performance indicators to measure performance, and build a sustainability capital reserve to capture cost savings for possible future investments. Deliverables for the course are a SAP document and a presentation to the client stakeholders. During the semester, a substantial amount of time is spent by the instructor providing consultative guidance with knowledge shared by other consultants regarding how to most effectively address organizational requirements and develop actionable solutions. The course structure enables and ensures evaluation of consultant effort through consultant reflections as well as client submission of a satisfaction survey. Past clients have included Adidas; Amazon; Bogota, Columbia; Greater Pittsburgh YMCA; Georgetown University in Qatar; New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation; United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Ganges River Rejuvenation; and the Utah Center for Affordable Housing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Final paper/project due Friday, August 20.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability. Candidates must be in good academic standing, in their final semester, and have successfully completed all other degree requirements, including the Harvard Extension School precapstone tutorial, ENVR E-598A, in the 2021 spring term.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33324/2021

EPS S-58
Natural Disasters

Esther K. James, PhD

Preceptor in Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34808

Description
Natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods, claim thousands of lives and cause tens of billions of dollars in damage each year. In this course, we develop an understanding of these natural hazards from an earth science perspective and explore how the dynamic processes operating on and within the earth can impact humans. Given our scientific understanding of these phenomena, emphasis is placed on ways to assess and forecast future natural disasters and to mitigate the adverse impacts on our societies. A collaborative environment is encouraged, and students have the opportunity to work in groups on fun activities and to examine several case studies of various natural disasters to assess their catastrophic impact.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Science and Technology in Society Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1098. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 100 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34808/2021

EPS S-101
Global Warming Science

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35092

Description
This course is an introduction to the science of climate change and global warming, meant to assist students in processing issues that often appear in the news and public debates. Topics include the greenhouse effect and consequences of the rise of greenhouse gasses, including sea level rise, ocean acidification, heat waves, droughts, glacier melting, expected changes to hurricanes, and more. The scientific basis for each subject is covered, and every class involves a hands-on analysis of observations, climate models, and climate feedbacks, using python Jupyter notebooks. Throughout, an ability to critically evaluate observations, predictions, and risk is encouraged.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Basic calculus and ordinary differential equations. Some exposure to very basic programming experience is assumed. The course introduces students to various science subjects, but no prior college-level science knowledge is assumed.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35092/2021

EPS S-135
Water and the Environment

Kaighin A. McColl, PhD

Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences and of Environmental Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35057

Description
What do landslides in Brazil, droughts in California, mass migration in Syria, and the collapse of Mayan civilization all have in common? Water. This course introduces students to the terrestrial water cycle: how it works, how humans manipulate it, and how it manipulates us. Students learn about the major components of the terrestrial water cycle, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff and streamflow, and saturated and unsaturated subsurface flow. They also learn about the causes and consequences of natural hazards associated with the water cycle—including floods, landslides, and droughts—and examine several case studies, with a focus on human impacts. The course considers how the water cycle has contributed to the demise of past civilizations and explores implications for modern society in a warming world.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Science and Technology in Society Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1156. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35057/2021

EPS S-164
Environmental Chemistry

Scot T. Martin, PhD

Gordon McKay Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35082

Description
The course covers concepts and applications of chemical kinetics and chemical thermodynamics for environmental science and engineering. Topics include air pollution, ozone hole, indoor air quality, energy use, greenhouse gases, water quality and pollution, water purification, and toxic metals.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: CHEM S-1ab, Physical Sciences 11 in Harvard College, or the equivalent in general chemistry.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35082/2021

EXPO S-5
Fundamentals of Grammar

Jerusha Achterberg, MPH

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35095

Description
This course is a review of the elements of grammar. We examine sentence structure, parts of speech, correct verb forms, case of pronouns, agreement, punctuation, and restrictive and nonrestrictive (that/which) clauses. Along the way, we learn something of the power and the pleasure of controlling grammar to make our words work for us exactly as we want them to. Short readings illustrate the basic elements and the beauties of grammar and style. Short reading assignments offer students opportunities to practice the lessons of the course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35095/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Christina Rarden Grenier, MA

Director of the Writing Center, Pingree School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34590 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34590/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Allyson K. Boggess, MFA

Admissions Advisor, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34580 | Section 8

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34580/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Randy S. Rosenthal, MTS

Editor

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34579 | Section 6

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34579/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta, PhD

Writer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33217 | Section 2

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33217/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Heather Corbally Bryant, PhD

Lecturer in the Writing Program, Wellesley College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34465 | Section 3

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34465/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Steven Wandler, PhD

Writing Intensive Program Director, St. Catherine University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34464 | Section 11

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34464/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Janet Sylvester, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34280 | Section 9

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34280/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Janet Sylvester, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34243 | Section 10

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34243/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Winifred J. Wood, PhD

Senior Lecturer Emerita in the Writing Program, Wellesley College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34902 | Section 5

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34902/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Matthew T. Levay, PhD

Associate Professor of English and Director of Graduate Studies in English, Idaho State University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34877 | Section 7

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34877/2021

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35030 | Section 4

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35030/2021

EXPO S-20D
Writing about Social and Ethical Issues

Matthew B. Cole, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33881

Description
Students read varying viewpoints on controversial current issues, such as medical ethics, poverty, the environment, race, ethnicity, immigration, privacy, and labor, and learn how to analyze and present conflicting opinions. They learn how to critically analyze texts and write papers in a social science context. They also learn to transform their own assertions and viewpoints into coherent arguments.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33881/2021

EXPO S-20E
The Essay

Collier Brown, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34135 | Section 1

Description
Students read essays that highlight this literary form’s variety and richness. They write analytical essays that focus on technique and the way other writers use language. Through sequenced assignments, students learn to transform their own experiences, observations, and thoughts into evidence.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34135/2021

EXPO S-20E
The Essay

Paul A. Thur, MA

Director of the Writing Center, College of General Studies, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31290 | Section 2

Description
Students read essays that highlight this literary form’s variety and richness. They write analytical essays that focus on technique and the way other writers use language. Through sequenced assignments, students learn to transform their own experiences, observations, and thoughts into evidence.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31290/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Lisa A. Gulesserian, PhD

Preceptor on Armenian Language and Culture, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34600 | Section 3

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34600/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Emilie J. Raymer, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34582 | Section 2

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34582/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Ryan Napier, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34466 | Section 4

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34466/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Christian Bleakly Schlegel, PhD

Teaching Fellow in General Education, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35186 | Section 8

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35186/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Tad Davies, PhD

Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33952 | Section 7

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33952/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34899 | Section 6

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Alexander L. Creighton, MA

Doctoral Candidate in English, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35019 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35019/2021

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35018 | Section 5

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Kurt Pitzer, MFA

Author

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34608 | Section 5

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34608/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Jennifer Ann Doody, ALM

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34578 | Section 3

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34578/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Cynthia F. C. Hill, PhD

Geoffrey Hill, PhD

Assistant Dean for Academics Affairs, The Graduate School, Princeton University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34573 | Section 7

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34573/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Randy S. Rosenthal, MTS

Editor

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34249 | Section 4

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34249/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Thomas Akbari, MA

Lecturer in English, Northeastern University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32927 | Section 2

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32927/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Jennifer Ann Doody, ALM

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35206 | Section 9

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Franklin J. Schwarzer, JD

Attorney, Schlesinger and Buchbinder, LLP

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34015 | Section 6

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34015/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Gillian M. Sinnott, SJD

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 33970 | Section 8

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Final paper due Monday, August 16.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33970/2021

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Franklin J. Schwarzer, JD

Attorney, Schlesinger and Buchbinder, LLP

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35015 | Section 1

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing—memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, reports—address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35015/2021

EXPO S-42A
Writing in the Humanities

Patricia M. Bellanca, PhD

Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35021

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the humanities. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Harvard Extension School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the work of reading, writing about, and conducting research on literary texts.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35021/2021

EXPO S-42B
Writing in the Social Sciences

Evander Lewis Price, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Religion and the Human, Indiana University, Bloomington

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35174 | Section 2

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the social sciences. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Extension or Summer School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the various social science disciplines and their approaches, while also learning how to become critical consumers of social science research. Students develop their own independent research project in the social science field of their choosing. This project lasts the entire semester and involves developing a viable research question; learning how to find, analyze, and interpret resources appropriately; and, finally, developing and refining an original argument in a final paper.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35174/2021

EXPO S-42B
Writing in the Social Sciences

Janling Fu, AM

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35189 | Section 3

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the social sciences. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Extension or Summer School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the various social science disciplines and their approaches, while also learning how to become critical consumers of social science research. Students develop their own independent research project in the social science field of their choosing. This project lasts the entire semester and involves developing a viable research question; learning how to find, analyze, and interpret resources appropriately; and, finally, developing and refining an original argument in a final paper.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35189/2021

EXPO S-42B
Writing in the Social Sciences

Evander Lewis Price, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Religion and the Human, Indiana University, Bloomington

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33884 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the social sciences. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Extension or Summer School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the various social science disciplines and their approaches, while also learning how to become critical consumers of social science research. Students develop their own independent research project in the social science field of their choosing. This project lasts the entire semester and involves developing a viable research question; learning how to find, analyze, and interpret resources appropriately; and, finally, developing and refining an original argument in a final paper.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33884/2021

EXPO S-42C
Writing in the Sciences

Thomas Akbari, MA

Lecturer in English, Northeastern University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33356

Description
This course provides instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the natural, computational, or applied sciences. Through critical reading of key examples of the genres of scientific literature, students study how scientific texts address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, deploy keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course’s workshop approach fosters skills in revision, peer review, and research into the scientific literature. The course offers writing strategies for successful communication in the field, including concise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents. Projects include an academic research paper on a topic of a student’s choice in a form common to most scientific disciplines. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at Extension or graduate study elsewhere.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1880
Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33356/2021

FREN S-AA
Beginning French I

Emma Zitzow-Childs, AM

Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Therese Banks, AM

Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33550 | Section 2

Description
This beginning French course provides an introduction to French with emphasis on interpersonal communication and the interpretation and production of language in written and oral forms. Students engage in interactive communicative activities designed for the virtual classroom that provide rich exposure to the French and francophone language and culture. Students engage in the discussion and interpretation of various French media sources including video, images, music, and film, with special attention to how we interact with them in a virtual setting. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course French 10.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, noon-2 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33550/2021

FREN S-AA
Beginning French I

Emily Epperson, AM

Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34900 | Section 1

Description
This beginning French course provides an introduction to French with emphasis on interpersonal communication and the interpretation and production of language in written and oral forms. Students engage in interactive communicative activities designed for the virtual classroom that provide rich exposure to the French and francophone language and culture. Students engage in the discussion and interpretation of various French media sources including video, images, music, and film, with special attention to how we interact with them in a virtual setting. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course French 10.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, noon-2 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34900/2021

FREN S-C
Intermediate French: Francophone Culture in Local Communities

Karen Turman, PhD

Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35045

Description
This intermediate-level language course explores cultural topics such as music, dance, and cuisine in France and other French-speaking countries. We in turn expand our discovery of Francophone cultures through conversations with language partners, interactive discussions with French-speaking guests, and virtual exploration of local French-speaking communities. Themes such as family life in West Africa, sustainability in the French-speaking Pacific, and First Nation dancers in Quebec are broached through communicative activities in order to build on oral, written, and intercultural competences. Using various texts, films, and multimedia resources as a basis for discussion, we also build vocabulary and review and refine various grammatical structures. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences French 20.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Beginning-level college French courses or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35045/2021

FREN S-41
Advanced French: The Contemporary Francophone World through Cinema

Madeleine Wolf, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35043

Description
This advanced French language and culture course explores Francophone cultures through contemporary cinema. The course is designed to strengthen language proficiency, explore different registers of language, and further refine students’ grammatical understanding while offering an introduction to film analysis. Students engage in interactive communicative activities, exploring themes such as regional differences, Paris and the banlieue, immigration, post-colonialism, cinematic self-portraits, and gender through readings such as film reviews, interviews with directors, and script excerpts. Coursework also includes creative interactive writing assignments, short compositions, and a screenplay. Conducted entirely in French; no previous familiarity with film study is necessary.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. This course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences French 40.

Prerequisites: Four semesters of college-level French or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35043/2021

FREN S-80
Comic Relief: The Power of Humor in Social Fiction

Kathy A. Richman, PhD

Lecturer on Romance Languages and Literatures and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35009

Description
This course, which is conducted in French, focuses on French fictional works which use humor to “dorer la pilule,” or make more palatable, the social ills and political dangers they reveal. With naifs and rebellious women as protagonists, these coming-of-age stories raise questions about the relationship between social critique and self-discovery. We will explore nuances of irony, parody, satire, and slapstick in works by Voltaire, Bernard Vargaftig, Driss Chraibi, and Raymond Queneau.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Six semesters of college-level French or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35009/2021

GERM S-BAB
Beginning German

Sebastian Alexander Brass, MA

Doctoral Candidate in Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Lauren Geppi, MA

Doctoral Candidate in Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31838

Description
This intensive summer course introduces the fundamentals of the German language generally taught to students over the course of two semesters. It focuses on speaking, listening, reading comprehension, and writing. In addition to building on language skills, this course introduces students to the culture of the German-speaking countries through discussions of cinema, literature, and other media. By the end of this course, students are able to express themselves in conversations with native speakers, describe their experiences, and engage with a variety of materials and resources.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 9 am-1 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: This course is designed for students without prior knowledge of German. Students who have taken three years or more of German at the high school level are not eligible to take this course. For more information please contact the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31838/2021

GERM S-DA
Intermediate German I

Robert L. Stone, MA

Doctoral Candidate in Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35159

Description
This intermediate-level German language course offers a thorough review and practice of grammar and an expansion of vocabulary. Focus is on enhancing students’s communicative competencies in key skill areas. Students are introduced to various cultural topics of the German-speaking countries through the use of literary and non-literary texts, current news, and contemporary film.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: One year of college-level German or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35159/2021

GERM S-R
German for Reading Knowledge

Peter J. Burgard, PhD

Professor of German, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31302

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to acquire a precise reading knowledge of sophisticated German prose for research, study, and/or career purposes. The course focuses on grammar topics, parsing, and translation, for which texts from a variety of fields are employed. Starting the course with no knowledge of German, you will be able to decipher and translate Kant, Nietzsche, and Freud and read scholarship in your field of specialization by the end of the course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 10 am-1 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31302/2021

GERM S-40
Advanced German through Media

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34866

Description
This advanced language course is an exploration of the German language and culture through German media, including film, all formats of printed text, online and televised news, advertisements, radio broadcasts, podcasts, and music. The course is designed to develop oral and written skills for analyzing, contextualizing, comparing, synthesizing, and discussing German media content with a focus on conversation. Taught in German.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Two years of college-level German or the equivalent. This course is not open to native speakers of German.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34866/2021

GMAT S-1
Mathematics Review for the GMAT and GRE

Linda Garant, MS

Lecturer on Mathematics, Tufts University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30257

Description
This course is a fast-paced review of the mathematics segments of the business school and graduate school aptitude tests, including a review of algebra, geometry, word problems, probability, descriptive statistics, data sufficiency, and graph interpretation. The course covers strategies for solving typical exam problems. Homework includes both video lectures and problem solving.

Class Meetings:
Online

Individual and small group meetings with the instructor to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $1700

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30257/2021

GOVT S-10
Introduction to Political Philosophy

Andrew F. March, DPhil

Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30154

Description
This course investigates the central problems of political theory that concern the justification and operation of democratic forms of government. What is democracy? What is the proper purpose and scope of political life? How can we judge between different political systems and assess their relative merits and virtues? What are the various ends of political life and how do they conflict? What is the relationship between democracy and other values or goods, like rights, justice, equality, and solidarity? What is the purpose of democracy and the strongest defense of it? Given the purposes of democracy, how is it attained and preserved? What are some of the most urgent contemporary debates and controversies in democratic theory and practice? We take up these questions by reading a combination of classical works of modern political philosophy from Machiavelli to Marx, along with contemporary work in political theory.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30154/2021

GOVT S-20
Introduction to Comparative Politics

George Soroka, PhD

Lecturer on Government, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32003

Description
This course offers an introduction to major concepts and theories in comparative politics, and familiarizes students with the basic tools of comparative analysis. The course asks such questions as: when do revolutions occur? Why are some countries democratic while others are not? What is the interplay between culture and politics? How do economic factors influence political development? To what extent are political processes the result of individual volition versus larger structural forces? In answering these questions, we examine cases from around the globe and across time. The objective of this course is twofold: to provide students with a theoretical grounding through which to understand the political world we inhabit, and to introduce students to the field of comparative politics, with its empirical expectations and modes of argumentation.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32003/2021

GOVT S-40
International Conflict and Cooperation

Dustin Tingley, PhD

Professor of Government, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30155

Description
This course is an introduction to the analysis of the causes and character of international conflict and cooperation. Theories of international relations are presented and then applied to contemporary and historical cases. The course begins with a foundational review of the different levels at which states interact and the primary theoretical paradigms in the field. It then addresses how states achieve cooperation in the face of international anarchy, a question that has attracted the attention of scholars since Thucydides. The course next addresses basic bargaining theory, which uses insights from economics to explore how bargaining breakdowns, commitment problems, and incomplete information can lead to war. Thereafter we examine three popular topics in contemporary international relations research: the roles that psychology, leaders, and domestic politics play in explaining international conflict and cooperation. We also explore the sources and effects of international institutions such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization. We spend a week studying terrorism, a problem of particular significance in the modern world. We also look at trade, foreign aid, international development, and climate change. We conclude with international law and an exploration of the future of international relations.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 72 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30155/2021

GOVT S-1045
Justice: Ethics in an Age of Pandemic and Racial Reckoning

Sergio Imparato, PhD

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35084

Description
What is a just society? What do we owe one another as citizens? What is a good life? These questions, long debated by philosophers, arise with special urgency at a time of pandemic and racial reckoning. The course explores these questions by considering how philosophers have tried to answer them, and by debating contemporary issues—in politics and everyday life—that prompt us to ask questions such as, what is the right thing to do? Topics include controversies about equality and inequality, individual rights and the common good, the role of government and markets, and competing conceptions of identity and community. Cases include ethical questions arising from the pandemic and recent debates about racial justice.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Ethics and Civics Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1171. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35084/2021

GOVT S-1111
Political Corruption

Jeeyang Rhee Baum, PhD

Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34530

Description
This course provides a comparative analysis of political corruption in rich and poor countries around the world. Why do countries vary in the extent of corruption they experience and with what consequences? This course explores this question using empirical data, as well as related issues. For example, how and why do public officials abuse the public trust and engage in illegal actions while in office? Why is corruption so prevalent in poor countries? Does political corruption decline with economic development? What do politicians gain from political corruption? Under what conditions do countries adopt anti-corruption strategies and how effective have they been? In addition, we examine case studies, including Brazil, India, Indonesia, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, Taiwan, Uganda, and the United States.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34530/2021

GOVT S-1113
Democracy’s Century: Democratic Transitions in Comparative Perspective

George Soroka, PhD

Lecturer on Government, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33159

Description
This course addresses the question of tough transitions. Democracy has come to many different lands in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, but its record of success once there has been remarkably variable. Consequently, we ask two interrelated questions, drawing upon both theoretical literature and case studies: what conditions are propitious or deleterious for democratic consolidation? And, in the latter instance, are there ways of overcoming less than ideal starting points? Posing these questions requires distinguishing between the process of democratization and the outcome of a stable, well-functioning democratic regime. In doing so, we examine problematic cases, historic and contemporary, where democracy has survived and thrived despite the initial odds (India, Germany). We also look at democratic reversals, where hopes of competitive elections and representative governance have been thwarted (Russia). The point of doing so is to have students think critically about democratic theory and regime change in order to assess events such as the Arab Spring and evaluate what factors are unfavorable to democracy (and why), as well as whether these might be overcome through institutional design or other means.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33159/2021

GOVT S-1116
Populism and the Erosion of Democracy

Jeeyang Rhee Baum, PhD

Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35017

Description
What is populism, and how much of a threat is it to democracy? The recent rise of authoritarian-populism, across both long-established and developing democracies, has posed new challenges for good governance. This course explores the conditions for the rise of populism, evaluates how much of a threat it poses for democracy, and examines the different forms it takes. Topics include: the role of economic grievances, immigration trends, civic culture, electoral rules, and party competition. We examine these topics through a range of comparative country cases including the United States, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Hungary, Turkey, the Philippines, and India.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35017/2021

GOVT S-1130
Intellectual Property

Allan A. Ryan, JD

Director of Intellectual Property, Harvard Business School Publishing

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31596

Description
Can anyone own ideas? Who owns the literary, artistic, musical, or inventive forms expressing ideas? This course examines the concept of intellectual property and the legal and social means that have developed over time to encourage and control it. We consider copyright, patent, and trademark regimes, together with related areas such as licensing and trade secrets. Case studies include the problems of the patent system, the growth of university licensing, the unique status of music, the emerging international law of intellectual property, the protection of design and fashion, and the tension between originality and creativity.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31596/2021

GOVT S-1275
Asia in World Affairs

Shinju Fujihira, PhD

Executive Director of the Program on US-Japan Relations, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35172

Description
This course examines the nature and causes of international conflict and cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region. Topics include use of force, alliances and multilateralism, trade and investment, nationalism and postcolonial disputes, nuclear weapons, territorial and maritime disputes, energy and climate change, and terrorism and political violence.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35172/2021

GOVT S-1315
Race and US Politics

Tess Wise, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor, Amherst College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35134

Description
This course elucidates American racial politics through a combination of theoretical and historical approaches. Theoretical issues include race as a social construct, political friendship theory, and racial contract theory. Historical material includes settler colonialism, Harvard’s racial history, enslavement, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, Civil Rights, migration, and the census. Politics in practice covers dog-whistle politics, representation, race and the presidency, race and the Supreme Court, policing, mass incarceration, and reparations. Students learn to think critically and have informed conversations about race, connecting course content to current events.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35134/2021

GOVT S-1362
Political Communication

Matthew A. Baum, PhD

Marvin Kalb Professor of Global Communications and Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33306

Description
This course considers the degree to which Americans’ political opinions and actions are influenced by the mass media and the influence that public opinion and the mass media, in turn, have on public policy. Topics to be covered include the history of the mass media, recent trends in the media, theories of attitude formation and change, the nature of news, the implications for political communication of changes in media (the rise of the internet, social media, and partisan media), the ways in which the news shapes the public’s perceptions of the political world, campaign communication, how the media and public opinion affect the manner in which public officials govern, and the general role of the media and public opinion in the democratic process.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33306/2021

GOVT S-1507
Introduction to Public Policy

Viridiana Rios, PhD

Young Global Leader Fellow, World Economic Forum

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34115

Description
With political polarization becoming the defining issue of our time, there is a pressing need to develop a more precise understanding of the complex incentives and limitations that shape the policy behavior of modern governments. In this course, we develop an in-depth understanding of what public policy is, and why we sometimes justify government action to solve social problems and other times do not. We learn each step of the policy process and evaluate the characteristics of effective and ineffective policies. We also examine the environments in which poorly designed public policies may have created unexpected and negative outcomes, such as inequality or political capture. This course explores many of the paradoxes inherent in public policy by focusing on the controversial topics that animate today’s most meaningful public debates, such as healthcare, police reform, gun ownership, homelessness, and education.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34115/2021

GOVT S-1550
Domestic Politics and Foreign Policy

Matthew A. Baum, PhD

Marvin Kalb Professor of Global Communications and Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33308

Description
This seminar surveys the theoretical and empirical literature on the influence of domestic politics on foreign policy and international politics, with a primary, though not exclusive, emphasis on American foreign policy. Scholars have long recognized that domestic politics influences states’ decision making in international trade and finance. Yet, in recent years we have witnessed an explosion of interest in understanding the linkage between domestic politics and international relations more broadly, including the decidedly high politics arena of war and peace. We review a variety of theoretical perspectives concerning both international economics and international security, ranging from the role of individuals and individual psychology, to the influence of interest groups, political institutions, the mass media, and public opinion. The goal is to assess the strengths and weaknesses of domestic political explanations for policy outcomes in foreign policy and international affairs.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33308/2021

GOVT S-1726
Intelligence and International Security

Michael David Miner, PhD

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34823

Description
This course explores the opaque world of intelligence and international security. The course begins with a survey of disciplines and methods of analysis before reviewing intelligence requirements as a component in policy processes that drive and inform decision making within the national security system. We consider various intelligence related topics including espionage, covert action, politicization, counterintelligence, public oversight, intelligence failure, and reform. The course strikes a balance between contemporary issues and the storied histories of intelligence systems around the world. Though predominantly focused on the United States, the course also considers intelligence activities in the United Kingdom, Russia, China, and elsewhere. Students grapple with historical and hypothetical problem sets based on real-world scenarios to develop assessment capabilities. Required readings and assignments draw on classic and influential work in addition to declassified documents which illuminate the historical narrative in a tangible way. The course concludes with reflections on how past experience informs current perspectives and might elucidate future intelligence requirements to better anticipate and understand the changing world.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34823/2021

GOVT S-1729
Debates in International Politics

David A. Rezvani, DPhil

Lecturer, Dartmouth College

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 33627

Description
This course critically examines arguments, analytical frameworks, and possible solutions for major debates in international politics. Students are encouraged to take positions on key economic, security, and global controversies. The course critically examines debates surrounding phenomena such as sovereignty, imperialism, terrorism, world governance, and state failure. It investigates disputes over international injustice, environmental degradation, global trade, as well as America’s role toward China and the rest of the world.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33627/2021

GOVT S-1731
The Future of War: Conflict and Order in the Twenty-First Century

Thomas M. Nichols, PhD

University Professor of National Security Affairs, Naval War College and Adjunct Professor, Air Force School of Strategic Force Studies

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32963

Description
This course is about the future of war and considers how both the reasons and the ways states go to war are changing. The course considers questions such as the following: How and why have states gone to war in the past? What were considered legitimate reasons for going to war? How will violence in the international system be governed in a world where norms about the use of force have changed? Specific topics to be addressed include the problem of military force for humanitarian intervention, the future of nuclear deterrence, the dilemma of preventive war, coercive approaches to nuclear nonproliferation, and ethical issues related to military conflicts in failed states or with nonstate actors.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32963/2021

GOVT S-1732
War Crimes, Genocide, and Justice

Allan A. Ryan, JD

Director of Intellectual Property, Harvard Business School Publishing

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31212

Description
This course examines the relationship between law and warfare, including the historical evolution of the law of war (including Shakespeare’s Henry V); war crimes and crimes against humanity, and their punishments; the Geneva Conventions; the growth of international human rights; and the concept of genocide. We examine the trial of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg, the 1968 massacre at My Lai in Vietnam, the ongoing persecution of the Rohinga in Myanmar; the International Criminal Court, and post-9/11 US policies on detention, torture, and trial, including the response of Congress and the Supreme Court, and related topics. The focus is on broad concepts of law, justice, and accountability in warfare and genocide. No prior knowledge of legal or military systems is required.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31212/2021

GOVT S-1743
Cyberspace and International Security

Derek Reveron, PhD

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard Extension School, Chair, National Security Affairs, Naval War College, and Faculty Affiliate, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35170

Description
In a very short time, individuals and companies have harnessed cyberspace to create new industries, a vibrant social space, and a new economic sphere that are intertwined with our everyday lives. At the same time, individuals, subnational groups, and governments are using cyberspace to advance interests through malicious activity. Terrorists recruit, train, and target through the internet; hackers steal data; and intelligence services conduct espionage. Still, the vast majority of cyberspace is a civilian space used by individuals, businesses, and governments for legitimate purposes. This course examines current and future threats to cyberspace, studies various approaches to advance and defend national interests, and contrasts the US approach with European, Russian, and Chinese approaches in cyberspace.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35170/2021

GOVT S-1744
Women, Peace, and Security

Joan Johnson-Freese, PhD

Professor of National Security Affairs, Naval War College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34443

Description
This course examines the increasingly recognized role of women in global peace and security affairs, as demonstrated by the groundbreaking UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) that over 80 countries have National Action Plans to implement, the lifting of bans on women in combat roles in many countries, and the bipartisan 2017 passage of the first of its kind Women, Peace and Security Act in the US. From politics to the military, education, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and grass roots organizations, women are involved in conflict prevention and peace building. The course examines various perspectives on empowering women to play positive, active roles in these areas.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34443/2021

GOVT S-1749
The Political Economy of Globalization: Challenges and Opportunities

Thomas Gift, PhD

Associate Professor of Political Science, University College London

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33666

Description
The late twentieth- and early twenty-first centuries have brought many unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Even as Brexit has exposed gaping fault lines in the internationalist agenda, globalization and the flattening of the world mean that countries and individuals are intertwined like never before in history. Against this backdrop, standards of living in many countries have skyrocketed, millions of people have escaped poverty, and countless others have capitalized on new opportunities in work and life. At the same time, serious problems have emerged that pose a threat to sustained peace and prosperity across the globe. In this course, we explore the nature of these challenges and opportunities, why they have arisen, and what they portend for the future political and economic trajectory of citizens and societies. Particular attention is paid to topics such as global governance, labor markets, social policy, growth strategies, democracy and human rights, migration, and the environment. By the end of the course, students better understand what globalization is, what aspects of modern political and economic systems are due to globalization, the key advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and how globalization influences an array of exigent policy issues.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33666/2021

GOVT S-1763
Thinking Out of the Box: Exploring New Insights into North Korea

John Park, PhD

Director, Korea Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35137

Description
This course focuses on three major trends in an effort to understand better the North Korean regime’s goals, resources, and external environment. The first trend is the deepening relationship between the resurgent Workers’ Party of Korea and the Communist Party of China, which offers a unique glimpse of how the North Korean regime has been mutating and adapting under the leadership of Kim Jong Un. The second trend is the increasing commercialization occurring among the elites through state trading companies and among the masses through local markets. The third trend is the regime’s weakening grip on its information monopoly and the ensuing political, economic, and social consequences. Students hone their critical thinking skills by exploring new insights through the lens of recent research interviews with defectors; understand on-the-ground developments in the North Korea-China border region; learn methods for developing a framework of analysis, which they apply in the course; identify and apply earlier frameworks of analysis to current events; and further develop communication and presentation skills.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35137/2021

GOVT S-1865
US-Mexico Politics

Viridiana Rios, PhD

Young Global Leader Fellow, World Economic Forum

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34494

Description
Mexico is the US’s top trading partner and one of its most important political and strategic allies. The histories of both nations are inherently intertwined, and their relationship exhibits unique characteristics unseen in the rest of the world. This course focuses on understanding the five most critical policy challenges that the two countries currently face: trade, migration, organized crime, health, and national security. Students explore each of these topics in detail to understand how US policy has evolved over time and the issues that remain unsolved. Our goal is to appreciate the policy landscape between the US and Mexico in all its complexities while debunking the cartoonish stereotypes that dominate the public narrative.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34494/2021

GOVT S-1897
Crisis and Strategy in American Foreign Policy

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34539

Description
This course addresses the frameworks, patterns, and practice of America’s strategic response to crisis. It explores how institutions and policy traditions evolve in response to domestic and international challenges. It also examines some of the key political-military strategies that have been used by policy makers, including isolationism, containment, rollback, selective engagement, and flexible integration. The course assesses challenges that will continue to confront America into the future in the Trump Administration and beyond, including relations with China, terrorism, foreign occupation, nuclear weapons, and domestic lobbies. Students cannot take both GOVT S-1900 (this course’s previous number) and GOVT S-1897/GOVT E-1897 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34539/2021

GOVT S-1967
Muslim Politics

Ousmane Kane, PhD

Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Contemporary Islamic Religion and Society and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35136

Description
The course analyzes the competition over the meanings of symbols in post-colonial Muslim societies. Students survey the thought of prominent twentieth-century Muslim political thinkers (Islamists and liberals) as well as factors leading to the spread of Islamism in the last three decades. We pay attention to the continuous reconfiguration of Islamist political thought in recent decades and address ongoing debates on post Islamism and global jihad.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Islamic religion and history would be helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35136/2021

GREK S-AA
Beginning Greek

Nadav Asraf, BA

Doctoral Candidate in The Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35168

Description
This course is an introduction to ancient Greek, one of the foundational languages of Western civilization. Students learn the fundamental rules of morphology and syntax while acquiring a basic vocabulary in the language. Additionally, students develop an appreciation for the literature, history, and culture of classical Athens through readings inspired by the works of literary figures such as Aristophanes, Plato, and Herodotus. Students who successfully complete the course are suitably prepared to continue their ancient Greek journey into more advanced courses.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35168/2021

GREK S-AAB
Intensive Beginning Greek

Paul G. Johnston, AM

Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Justin S. Miller, MA

Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31871

Description
This course is designed for students with little or no prior instruction in ancient Greek who are committed to learning the language at rapid speed. Equivalent to the first two semesters of college-level instruction, it covers all basic grammar and vocabulary while offering considerable practice in reading. By the end of the course students are sufficiently prepared to read continuous passages of poetry (Homer, Aristophanes, and Euripides) and prose (Plato, Herodotus, and Lysias) with the aid of a dictionary.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Mondays-Fridays, 1-3 and 4-6 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking intensive Greek or Latin. See the department’s website for more information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31871/2021

HARC S-96B
Architecture Design Studio: Urban Connections

Lisa A. Haber-Thomson, PhD

Lecturer in Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35105

Description
The practice of architecture fundamentally asks us to continuously engage with and re-conceptualize the world for which we are designing. As such, architecture as a discipline is not only about designing buildings, but also about challenging us to imagine new ways of seeing the world. This design studio course takes on the challenge through a series of design exercises focused on understanding, engaging with, and reimaging the urban condition. We directly confront the social, political, and environmental contexts that are necessarily implicated in any design process. The studio culminates in a design proposal for a site in Harvard Square. Students are given an architectural brief and produce projects that address existing site conditions, programmatic space requirements, and projected users of the site. Technical workshops provide all the skills required for the course and allow students to develop aptitude in architectural drawing, mapping, and rendering. No existing expertise or technical proficiency is necessary for this course. Students from all backgrounds are welcome; we encourage interdisciplinary thinking throughout the design research process.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35105/2021

HARC S-120
Introduction to Western Architecture

Joseph Connors, PhD

Research Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34429

Description
This course is an introduction to western architecture from the ancient world to the late twentieth century. After preliminary study of the conventions of architectural representation and uses of materials, the course offers a historical overview of key monuments of Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Gothic, Renaissance, and modern architecture. Geographically, the course moves from the Mediterranean through northern Europe and Britain to the United States, with lectures also on select Islamic monuments. The intersection of engineering, aesthetics, and symbolism are studied in the Pantheon and its emulators in Renaissance Florence, Michelangelo’s Rome, and Wren’s London. Urban planning is the focus of classes on New York and Washington, DC. The interaction of American and European modernism concludes the course, with emphasis on Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34429/2021

HARC S-187
Introduction to Japanese Art

Yukio Lippit, PhD

Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34738

Description
This course surveys the arts of Japan from the prehistoric era through the twentieth century. The primary focus is on Japanese painting, sculpture, and architecture of the premodern period, although the critical role of calligraphy, garden design, ceramics, lacquerware, textiles, and prints is also explored. Aesthetic ideas, religious traditions, craft processes, and viewing practices are studied alongside more focused themes such as the role of print culture, censorship, erotica, Japonisme, Sino-Japanese exchange, the representation of war, and the role of art in the transition to modernity. Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical skills for the interpretation of visual images as well as the comparative understanding of Japanese artistic practices vis-a-vis other artistic traditions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34738/2021

HARC S-197
Contemporary Photography: War and Conflict

Makeda Best, PhD

Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography, Harvard Art Museums, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34739

Description
This course examines how photographs of contemporary conflict have had an impact on the history of photography and the role of the photographic documentarian in society. Contemporary war photographs circulate in various forms—from social media outlets to photobooks to museum walls. The so-called “Forever Wars” of our present era have taken place alongside a burgeoning field of photographic image production, and writing and theorizing about photography as an art form, instrumental tool, and cultural and political force. Through these works and texts, we explore how contemporary war photographs challenge notions of photographic truth, have an impact on the role of photography in the museum, drive political discourse and transform the meanings of contemporary conflicts, disrupt ideas about art and warfare, and raise new ethical dilemmas around issues of privacy and public policy.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34739/2021

HIST S-1570
German History from Bismarck to Hitler

Alison Frank Johnson, PhD

Professor of History and Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35107

Description
This course is an introduction to modern German history with a focus on the tension between democratic and authoritarian principles, inclusion and exclusion, and race and nationality.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35107/2021

HIST S-1571
Berlin and the Postwar Urban Experience

Briana J. Smith, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35051

Description
This course examines the history of Berlin from the end of World War II through the aftermath of German reunification in the 1990s, paying careful attention to the lives of city dwellers and the ever-changing urban landscape. Our discussion of diaries, primary source documents, literature, films, art, and music produced in divided Berlin reveals how the divided city and wall shaped individual lives and subjectivities, and how individual Berliners shaped the history and urban experience of Berlin from 1945 to 1999.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35051/2021

HIST S-1646
Asian American History and Culture, 1924 to the Present

Mark Sanchez, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34813

Description
This course offers an in-depth survey of Asian American history and culture from the early twentieth century to the present, starting with Congress’s passage of the 1924 Asian Exclusion Act and culminating with an exploration of the experience of Asian Americans in society today. Drawing on an array of primary sources, novels, films, and contemporary scholarship, we examine the historical role Asian Americans have played in shaping our ideas of race, gender, labor, empire, and migration, and we take a critical look at the category Asian American, examining how it has been used to racialize immigrants while also being appropriated by activists as a positive political identity. We examine the allure of the idea of Asian Americans as a model minority, as well as the ways such narratives oversimplify Asian America and contribute to discrimination against other communities of color. Through our conversations and coursework, we ultimately seek to arrive at an understanding of what Asian America is and why it is important for a deeper understanding of American history.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34813/2021

HIST S-1827
The United States and China: Opium War to the Present

Erez Manela, PhD

Professor of History, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35006

Description
The relationship between China and the United States is now, and will likely continue to be, among the most important international relationships of our era. But this relationship has a long history, a history which we must study if we wish to understand present and future challenges and opportunities more fully. In this course, students explore diverse aspects of the history of Sino-American relations since the early nineteenth century. We cover major episodes such as the Boxer intervention, the first and second world wars, the Korean War, the Mao-Nixon rapprochement, and the post-Mao relationship. We also examine central themes such as trade, migration, cultural perceptions, war, and revolution.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35006/2021

HIST S-1919
History of European Imperialism in North Africa

John R. Boonstra, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35050

Description
This course surveys how imperial ambitions and colonial endeavors—French and British, but also Italian, German, and Ottoman—shaped the histories of Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We inquire into how power was asserted, negotiated, and resisted, from wars of pacification to revolutionary independence movements, and along lines of race, gender, religion, class, and nation. Our subjects are everyday people as well as political and military leaders, and we ask how different groups each experienced and understood the upheavals and oppression of colonial contact. We also consider how different forms of empire were established in North Africa, exploring, for instance, how Algeria could be asserted as French, while Egypt remained nominally Ottoman and autonomous. Finally, we seek to trace how imperial legacies have continued to affect the region’s persistent, if troubled, ties to Europe.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35050/2021

HIST S-1943
From Wounded Knee to Standing Rock: Native America in the Twentieth Century

Christopher Clements, PhD

Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34822

Description
This course explores various forms of Native American cultural and political production in the twentieth century. Drawing on fiction, film, historical documents, documentaries, photographs, nonfiction, and memoirs, this course explores the ways in which indigenous people have articulated both belonging and separateness from the United States. In addition to its focus on key aspects of modern indigenous culture and politics—sovereignty, self-determination, decolonization, anti-racism, gender equality, and land claims, to name a few—we also consider broader conceptual questions. What, for example, is the relationship between indigeneity and modernity? Does the twentieth century mark a distinct break from the first four hundred years of Native-settler history? How does settler colonialism intersect with other forms of oppression? And why have events like Wounded Knee II and Standing Rock gained support from wider, non-indigenous publics while issues like police brutality against Native people and the ongoing crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) have not?

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with twentieth-century US history is helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34822/2021

HIST S-1960
The History of the Cold War

Serhii Plokhii, PhD

Mykhailo S. Hrushevs’Kyi Professor of Ukrainian History, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33518

Description
This course introduces students to major topics in cold war history. It begins with a discussion of the diplomatic legacy of the two world wars, proceeds to an analysis of postwar rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, and ends with the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989), the disintegration of the Soviet Union (1991), and the making of the post-cold war world order.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33518/2021

HSCI S-101
Rethinking the Darwinian Revolution

Janet Browne, PhD

Aramont Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

Liv H. M. J. Grjebine, DPhil

Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35087

Description
This course explores the history of evolutionary thought in the western world, with a special focus on Charles Darwin’s and Alfred Wallace’s ideas. It discusses why these views were so controversial and looks at modern evolution-religion debates. The course addresses the way science has become a leading feature of modern life.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Histories, Societies, Individuals Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1048. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 100 students

HSCI S-111
Science and Politics: Current Debates in Historical Perspective

Liv H. M. J. Grjebine, DPhil

Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35158

Description
This course aims to understand the complex relationship between science and politics. We shed light on current debates by analyzing a selection of historical turning points. People often assume that the objectivity of science depends on the separation between science and politics. However, science and politics have always been interrelated. Scientists are frequently subjected to the decisions of the politicians who finance them and who speak in their names. Moreover, scientists often have to be savvy politicians, using strategies to gain position, funding, and recognition. Publicizing a new discovery or promoting a new theory requires not only scientific evidence, but also political skills, especially when scientists seek to overthrow a dominant theory. What does this mean for the objective ideals of science? How can we expect the public to trust science when politics is often accused of distorting science? What is the line between normal interactions between science and politics and extraordinary or dangerous ones?

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35158/2021

HSCI S-176
Mind and Brain: Themes in the History of Neuroscience

Yvan Craig Prkachin, PhD

Lecturer on the History of Science, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34483

Description
This course examines the development of the neurosciences from the late eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century, with the aim of providing students with a firm foundation in their historical, philosophical, technical, and cultural contexts. Topics to be examined include the origins of neuroscience in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century debates over phrenology and the localization of mental faculties; the emergence of reflex theory and arguments over the evolution of the nervous system; the emergence of neurology and neurosurgery as medical specialties; lobotomy and the debates over psychosurgery; the technological turn in the brain sciences and the emergence of neuroscience during the cold war; the birth of modern brain scanning technologies; Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other diseases of the nervous system; artificial intelligence and neural networks; and contemporary debates over autism and neurodiversity.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34483/2021

HSCI S-202
Deadly Diseases: Epidemics throughout History

Sean Tath O’Donnell, PhD

Associate Director of Academic Ventures and Engagement, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35078

Description
Outbreaks of epidemic disease have played a role in shaping human societies from the beginning of recorded history, transforming demographic patterns, social practices, and cultural expectations. Although they take fewer lives than the diseases we encounter every day, epidemics possess an extraordinary hold over our collective imagination; this course seeks to understand why. Through an analysis of the Black Death to COVID-19, we explore the place of epidemic disease in human history, taking into account how those living in different times and places have responded when epidemics have appeared.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35078/2021

HUMA S-100
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Dramatic Arts, English, and Religion

Collier Brown, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33838

Description
In this proseminar, students develop the research, writing, and analytical skills necessary to produce a successful graduate-level research project on a topic relevant to a humanities-related field. During the first part of the course, students read works of fiction and complete short assignments designed to refresh and deepen their experience with close textual analysis. In the second part, students write a 10-page argumentative essay, analyzing a work of fiction discussed in the course and engaging in an existing scholarly conversation about it. The course focuses on selections of stories by David Foster Wallace and Junot Díaz as well as Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42a is strongly recommended. In addition, at the first meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and capacity for coherent logical argument.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33838/2021

HUMA S-101
Proseminar: Elements of the Writer’s Craft

Bryan Delaney, MA

Playwright and Screenwriter

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34141 | Section 2

Description
This is an intensive course in the craft and analysis of prose from a writer’s perspective. Francine Prose, in her book Reading Like a Writer, observes that historically, “writers learned by reading the work of their predecessors.” In other words, we cannot write well if we do not know how to read well. The focus of this course is to teach prose writers how to read well. Students explore the potential and possibilities of different approaches to writing, and, by the end of the course, apply their close reading to their own fiction and nonfiction. The goal of this course is to build a deep understanding of key elements of craft through close reading and textual analysis of the work of master prose writers. We analyze the work of these writers, discussing how they employ structure, character, setting, dialogue, point of view, and other aspects of craft. Students write critically and creatively, both in class and out of class, about the works under discussion and about possible applications to their own creative writing. Students examine the conscious choices about craft that published writers make in order to fully realize a piece of writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42a is strongly recommended. Students in this course are expected to have a firm command of grammar, syntax, and prose composition, and to have read widely.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

HUMA S-101
Proseminar: Elements of the Writer’s Craft

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta, PhD

Writer

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34857 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive course in the craft and analysis of prose from a writer’s perspective. Francine Prose, in her book Reading Like a Writer, observes that historically, “writers learned by reading the work of their predecessors.” In other words, we cannot write well if we do not know how to read well. The focus of this course is to teach prose writers how to read well. Students explore the potential and possibilities of different approaches to writing, and, by the end of the course, apply their close reading to their own fiction and nonfiction. The goal of this course is to build a deep understanding of key elements of craft through close reading and textual analysis of the work of master prose writers. We analyze the work of these writers, discussing how they employ structure, character, setting, dialogue, point of view, and other aspects of craft. Students write critically and creatively, both in class and out of class, about the works under discussion and about possible applications to their own creative writing. Students examine the conscious choices about craft that published writers make in order to fully realize a piece of writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42a is strongly recommended. Students in this course are expected to have a firm command of grammar, syntax, and prose composition, and to have read widely.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34857/2021

HUMA S-110
Masterpieces of World Literature

Martin Puchner, PhD

Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

David Damrosch, PhD

Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33501

Description
This course surveys world literature from The Epic of Gilgamesh to the present, with an emphasis on different cultures and writing traditions. Produced by HarvardX, the course is based not on lectures but on a more vivid dialogue format between instructors Martin Puchner and David Damrosch. The course also includes travel footage from Istanbul and Troy to Jaipur and Weimar, and interviews with authors, such as Orhan Pamuk, and other experts.

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students see important degree credit information. The recorded lectures are from the HarvardX course Masterpieces of World Literature.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33501/2021

HUMA S-131
Political Intervention through the Arts

Doris Sommer, PhD

Ira Jewell Williams, Jr. Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35110

Description
How does thinking like an artist ignite political change? Art is the intentional disruption of existing perceptions. Creating political and social change—in relation to race, gender, education, climate change, business, and global health—requires one to think like an artist and be fully engaged in the process of discovery and invention. To better prepare humanistic interventions that develop the twenty-first-century skills of creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication, we practice art-making and interpret texts through the pre-texts methodology. Readings from Aristotle to Habermas raise questions and speculations on the effects of creative interruption on the political and social sphere. The final project is to design a collaborative-creative intervention for a political challenge. This course is a practical and urgent lesson in interdisciplinarity.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Aesthetics and Culture Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1139. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35110/2021

HUMA S-132
Security: Carefree or Careless

John T. Hamilton, PhD

William R. Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35064

Description
Security—broadly defined as “a removal of care”—leaves its subjects either carefree or careless. In examining literary and theoretical texts, this course draws out the ethical implications of the persistent concern to be free of concern. Does security make us vigilant or negligent, confident or complacent? Does it promote more fear than it assuages? Is a security purchased with freedom or human rights morally viable? Such questions broach a more informed, nuanced, and critical engagement concerning our civic, professional, and personal lives.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Harvard College students: this course counts for the Ethics and Civics Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1020. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 100 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35064/2021

HUMA S-152
Plotting Resistance in Fiction and Film: The Haiti-Cuba-Harlem Nexus

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34837

Description
This course examines fiction and film from Haiti, Cuba, and Harlem in the first half of the twentieth century, when authors Jacques Roumain, Nicolás Guillén, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston explored each other’s societies while challenging their own. Their fiction, poetry, and essays engage the experience of slavery and its legacies, resistance and revolution, and differing paths for development and progress. The course combines aesthetic analysis of literature, film, and music with an understanding of historical and political contexts. We discuss what we can learn about societies from their cultural production; how novels and film engage and trouble us; and how we categorize and evaluate works of art that make a political statement.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34837/2021

HUMA S-221
Inspirational Mexican Women: At the Crossroads of Love, Feminism, and Social Change

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 35010

Description
This course explores the lives and stories of influential Mexican women who shaped Mexico’s identity and inspired social transformation. The exploration of each story reveals different historical, cultural, and political crossroads where their influence and creative work became decisive, even if not recognized at the time. These crossroads refer to different key points in Mexican history: the conquest, colonization, independence, the Revolution and post-Revolution, and modern times. The icons focused on include La Malinche, the Virgen de Guadalupe, the poet Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, the intellectual Leona Vicario, the movie diva Dolores del Río, the composer María Greever, the writer Rosario Castellanos, and the journalist and activist Elena Poniatowska. We explore each story through a variety of multimodal materials (film, literature and poetry, academic articles, music, and visual art) and creative assignments. The goal is to provide students with a space to become familiar with women that have given Mexico a world presence and the multiple ways in which these female voices have inspired and contributed to feminism and social change movements in Mexico and beyond.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35010/2021

ISMT S-102
Case Studies in Enterprise Architecture

Zoya Kinstler, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35039

Description
Digital business places high demands on competency in enterprise architecture. Any business software application designed today becomes part of an enterprise ecosystem with architectural demands of interoperability, extensibility, scalability, security, and data integrity. This course offers case studies examining how today’s companies are implementing large-scale software platforms and transforming their business models using modern digital technologies such as internet-of-things (IoT), machine learning, blockchain, and robotic automation. The course covers essential concepts of enterprise architecture through business case studies and design exercises. Concepts covered include architecture frameworks, business requirements, system migration, and project roadmaps.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: At least two courses towards the Master of Liberal Arts, software engineering or information managment systems, or a working experience with software systems in business settings.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35039/2021

ISMT S-121
Health Information Systems

Aline Yurik, PhD

Director, Information Technology, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34798

Description
Health information systems provide technology and enable information exchange for healthcare enterprises, health information exchanges, health insurers, and other participants in the healthcare industry. This is a rapidly changing and evolving field, laying the foundation for improvements in healthcare efficiency, quality, and health outcomes. The course provides an overview of key healthcare information technologies and concepts: healthcare data and analytics, electronic health records (EHR), health information exchanges (HIE), healthcare information privacy and security, telemedicine, consumer health and mobile health systems, and population health management. A number of case studies provide additional analysis of technology challenges and solutions in healthcare informatics.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: CSCI E-10a and CSCI E-97, or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34798/2021

ISMT S-136
Time Series Analysis with Python

Dmitry V. Kurochkin, PhD

Senior Research Analyst, Faculty of Arts and Sciences Office for Faculty Affairs, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35041

Description
Time series data (for example, closing prices of an exchange-traded fund, maximum yearly temperatures, monthly PC sales, or daily numbers of visitors) arise whenever correlations of adjacent observations in time cannot be ignored. This course covers modern methods for time series analysis and forecasting. In addition to mathematical foundations of time series, students get hands-on experience building predictive models in cases of both stationary and non-stationary time series. Topics covered in the course include autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation, Fourier analysis, stationarity, time series decomposition, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) process and the Box-Jenkins methodology, generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model, and long short-term memory (LSTM), a special type of recurrent neural networks (RNN) which has demonstrated to be superior to classical time series models in many applications.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Introductory probability and statistics, multivariate calculus equivalent to MATH S-21a, and proficiency in Python programming equivalent to CSCI S-7. Familiarity with deep neural networks is helpful but not required. All coding exercises are performed in Python. Students are required to take a short pretest at the beginning of the course. The pretest score does not count toward the final grade but helps students understand whether their background in calculus, probability theory, as well as command of coding positions them for success in this course.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35041/2021

ISMT S-161
Computational Bayesian Inference

Theodore Hatch Whitfield, ScD

Principal and Statistical Consultant, Biostatistics Solutions

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34821

Description
This course is an introduction to the use of modern computational methods such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) for Bayesian inference. We start by learning what a Markov chain is, and how the celebrated Metropolis algorithm works. Next, we learn the basics of Bayesian inference and how to estimate parameters in these models using MCMC methods. We conclude with an exploration of multi-dimensional sampling with the Gibbs sampler, learning how to use this technique for a variety of models, from simple linear regression to complex hierarchical models. All coursework is completed using the R programming language in the RStudio environment. No prior knowledge of Bayesian inference is required, nor is familiarity with R assumed.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: One programming course in any programming language.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34821/2021

ISMT S-162
Applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Technology Innovation

Sahar Hashmi, MD, PhD

Healthcare Design and Management Consultant

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35165

Description
Providing an overview of the basic terminologies and concepts of artificial intelligence (AI), this course explores the application of AI in various fields, from self-driving cars to robot nurses in hospitals, and weighs the pros and cons of these innovative technologies that are replacing various human jobs in the United States and around the world. The course examines how smart technologies are disrupting current delivery systems, information technology systems, and business models, and it looks at the impact of AI in decision making and organizational behavior. Students undertake a project which examines the benefits and challenges of AI applications using real-world examples, with the goal of learning how to deal with these fast-paced technology innovations that are shaping the future.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35165/2021

ISMT S-165
Creating and Maintaining Scalable Design Systems

Bakhtiar Mikhak, PhD

Co-Founder, Media Modifications, Ltd.

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 35044

Description
This is a practical introduction to design systems and why they are rapidly gaining prominence across the industry. We introduce the design concepts that lay the foundation for maintainable, scalable design systems through case studies of the most notable design systems, such as Material Design by Google and Carbon Design System by IBM. We then create a design system from scratch. We begin with the visual rules and guidelines of the design system and their application to the design of the design system’s core icon set and component library. We then turn our attention to micro interactions, state transitions, and animations. We then translate these designs into a library of code components. While our implementation and documentation is as styled components in React, our approach lays the foundation for implementation with other languages and frameworks. We in particular address ensuring accessibility. Finally, we discuss human and organizational considerations in adopting, transitioning to, and maintaining design systems into existing product design teams and workflows.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35044/2021

ISMT S-599
Capstone Seminar in Digital Enterprise

Zoya Kinstler, PhD

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33285

Description
This interactive, fast-paced seminar focuses on digital technologies as tools for achieving business goals. A digital enterprise is defined as an organization whose business model and operating platform are driven by information technology (IT). Through readings and case studies, we learn how companies transform their processes and systems by implementing digital technologies: cloud services, mobile and social platforms, data analytics, and machine-to-machine communications. Then we roll up our sleeves and build a capstone project, architecting an IT solution for a realistic business scenario. Concepts covered include enterprise architecture, software systems, business processes, service orientation, system integration, and project implementation framework. Our seminar offers an intense learning experience via engaging lectures, case studies, demanding research and reading requirements, and stimulating teamwork.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), information management systems. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and have successfully completed at least nine degree-applicable courses, including all core degree requirements, with required grades. Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33285/2021

ITAL S-AA
Beginning Italian

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33401 | Section 2

Description
Intended and designed for students with little, if any formal knowledge of Italian, this course enables beginning students to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Italian in a cultural context. Activities include listening comprehension, grammar exercises, conversation, and role-playing, with a strong emphasis on oral communication.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33401/2021

ITAL S-AA
Beginning Italian

Matthew D’Ambrosio Griffith, AM

Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Amelia K. Linsky, AM

Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34903 | Section 1

Description
Intended and designed for students with little, if any formal knowledge of Italian, this course enables beginning students to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Italian in a cultural context. Activities include listening comprehension, grammar exercises, conversation, and role-playing, with a strong emphasis on oral communication.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 8:30-10:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34903/2021

JAPA S-BAB
Elementary Japanese I, II

Mihoko Yagi, EdM

Language Instructor in Japanese, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32813

Description
This course is designed for people with no background in Japanese. We cover lessons 1-12 of the Genki 1 textbook and lessons 13-16 of Genki 2. The goal for this fast-track introductory course is to develop a basic foundation in the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course introduces basic sentence patterns, vocabulary, and common expressions, which allow students to speak and write about themselves and those topics that are of personal relevance. At the completion of this course, students have survival-level communication skills to communicate solely in Japanese in common situations of daily life. This course also introduces the hiragana and katakana writing systems and about 210 kanji (Chinese characters).

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32813/2021

JAPA S-C
Basic Japanese

Ayako Anderson, MA

Instructor in Japanese, Phillips Academy and Noble and Greenough School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32880

Description
This course is for people with little or no background in Japanese. The course aims to develop a basic foundation in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course also introduces the Japanese writing systems, hiragana, katakana, and approximately 60 kanji (Chinese characters). Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students have survival-level communication skills in common daily life situations in Japanese.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32880/2021

JAPA S-120
Intermediate Japanese

Naomi Asakura, MA

Preceptor in Japanese, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33130

Description
This course is designed for students with a solid background in basic grammar, equivalent to one year of college study. Students are expected to have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills as well as reading and writing ability in hiragana, katakana and approximately 210 kanji in context. The course covers the second half of Genki 2 and some authentic materials. The goal is the simultaneous progression of four skills—speaking, listening, reading, and writing—enabling students to advance beyond beginning-level Japanese, further develop conversation strategies to improve daily communication, and become familiar with aspects of Japanese culture necessary for language competency.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: JAPA S-Bab or the equivalent of one year of college-level Japanese. Students must pass a placement test given the first day of class.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33130/2021

JOUR S-50
Basic Journalism in the Digital Age

Bukola Adebayo, BSc

Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32314

Description
The transition to digital media over the past generation has given new life to disinformation, blurred the public’s understanding of media, and changed the rules of audience engagement. Despite this evolution, one aspect remains the same: the foundation of trustworthy journalism is good writing based on solid ethics. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of journalism. It is largely a writing workshop organized around the basic principles of accuracy and fairness. It emphasizes news reporting while exploring the differences between newspapers, magazines, radio, television, feature, and opinion writing styles. Each class begins with a short news quiz and discussion of current events followed by a lecture and an in-class writing activity. Editors and reporters from media organizations, including CNN and the Pulitzer Center, give guest lectures.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32314/2021

JOUR S-100
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Journalism

Sallie Martin Sharp, PhD

Journalist

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35046

Description
This graduate proseminar introduces students to the fundamentals of journalism at the graduate level—research, interviewing, reporting, and writing—by exposing them to a variety of reporting assignments. Students learn how to construct a lead as well as how to structure a story. They experience the difference between a feature story and a news story by having to write them both.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35046/2021

JOUR S-135
Commentary and Op-Ed Writing

John A. Archibald, BA

Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35079

Description
Sharp and effective commentary, whether by professional columnists or engaged op-ed writers, creates much-needed conversation about important issues, be they political, social, or otherwise. It can stir the soul and may spur action, caution, or simply thought. Reckless commentary, on the other hand, can injure and mislead, leaving truth to drown in an ocean of unchecked and unsubstantiated opinion. This course helps students identify and write effective commentary by reporting columns thoroughly and fairly using accepted journalism standards. It helps students hone their own strong and decisive voice.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Writing-intensive course. This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35079/2021

JOUR S-137
Feature Writing

Sarah L. Kaufman, MSJ

Chief Dance Critic and Senior Arts Writer, The Washington Post

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34222 | Section 1

Description
This workshop-style course offers a critical and practical exploration of features journalism, including profiles, in-depth interviews, immersive reportage, and essays. We read and analyze published works, discuss the journalistic and storytelling methods, and watch events and performances that serve as our own creative material. Students also share their work, produced through a variety of writing assignments. Through these assignments, students develop research and reporting habits, hone their organization and personal style, and develop the imaginative skills to bring their subjects to life. Student work is grounded in journalistic basics and fact-gathering, as well as in techniques of narrative nonfiction, including structure and voice.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34222/2021

JOUR S-137
Feature Writing

Maxwell L. Strachan, BA

Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34878 | Section 2

Description
Great feature writing can immerse readers in new worlds and change the way they see their own. In this writing workshop, students learn how to develop such work, crafting engaging and creative nonfiction stories that experiment with various forms and styles. Together, we read a diverse set of authors, improve one another’s writing, hear from and speak to professional journalists, and experiment with our own profiles, first-person escapades, trend pieces, and other investigations. Students learn how to hone a winning pitch, structure a three-part story, grab the reader at the top, and leave them wanting more at the end. We also discuss how best to incorporate interviews, statistics, and personal experience to maximum effect.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34878/2021

JOUR S-140A
News Reporting and Writing

Ana L. Campoy Thompson, MA

Deputy Editor, Global Finance and Economics, Quartz Magazine

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34896

Description
In this changing media landscape, a journalist has no choice but to become a jack of all trades and to develop the ability to work on various media platforms. This fast-paced course teaches students to master the fundamentals of news writing and reporting for a variety of media. Students learn to think, observe, and ask questions like career journalists while developing the skills needed to shift seamlessly from writing for traditional news publications to updating internet sites or tweeting. The course stresses accuracy and fact-checking as well as the importance of reporting a balanced story.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34896/2021

JOUR S-140C
Race, Media, and News Writing

Austin B. Bogues, BA

Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35091

Description
This course examines the role race plays in current events and news writing. Students read a variety of opinion and news reporting pieces, and develop multiple original reporting pieces involving issues of race, race relations, and demographics in the United States. The course also brings in guest speakers to discuss reporting on race.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor. Students need to have standard reporter gear including smartphones, laptops, notebooks, and pens or other camera gear in order to produce multimedia pieces.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

JOUR S-161
Podcasting

Nneka N. Faison, MS

Executive Producer, WCVB-TV

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35093

Description
One in four Americans over the age of twelve listens to podcasts, a 200 percent increase in just the last decade. Growth is expected to continue. In a time when videos and articles are getting shorter, why are audio podcasts (averaging 45 minutes in length) becoming more popular? This course explores the power of podcasting and why seemingly everyone—businesses, news organizations, and yes, universities—wants to podcast. The first few weeks of the course focuses on exploring the main podcast categories: talk radio style, interview, narrative, and daily news podcasts. Students then learn podcasting business basics, from advertising to analytics. Along the way, students come up with their own podcast idea, analyze the potential success of their podcast, learn basic audio production and, by the end of the course, walk away with the first few episodes of a podcast.

Class Meetings:
Online with required weekend meeting
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Along with the web-conference meetings, this course includes an intensive—and mandatory—online weekend residency. Students must be present for the entire weekend session to earn credit for the course. The course begins via web conference during the first week of the Summer School term, and continues to meet through the week ending August 6. Please see the course website or syllabus for the specific weekly course meeting dates.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

JOUR S-164
Reporting Science

Robert E. Frederick, MS

Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35126

Description
As the coronavirus pandemic recently revealed, any journalist may be called upon to report on science. But reporting on science presents unique challenges, whether the story is about public health, environmental change, technological advancement, or the latest scientific discovery. This is because scientific knowledge is always contingent, and today’s media and political landscape does not favor contingent knowledge. In this course, students learn the core principles of responsible and effective science reporting for the public: how to pitch, interview expert sources, and craft engaging prose about scientific discoveries and the people who make them. Students learn to report and write day-of and week-of science news stories, which also form the root of all longer works of science journalism, including magazine features, documentary films, podcast series, and books. We consider science reporting from such publications and outlets as ScienceNow, Nature News, Science News, NPR, and PBS—outlets that accept freelanced work and for which students are prepared to pitch and write for upon completion of this course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor. Prior education in a scientific discipline, although helpful, is not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35126/2021

JOUR S-599
Journalism Capstone Project

June Carolyn Erlick, MSJ

Publications Director, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, and Editor-in-Chief, <i>ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America</i>, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33945

Description
The capstone is the culmination of the student’s work in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), journalism program and consists of a series of substantial stories completed in one semester. The capstone generally consists of three to five related pieces, text or multimedia based, in different styles. Text-based projects are generally about 5,000 words; the parameters of projects in other media are determined by the student and the project director together and are based on the requirements of the story. Past capstone directors have included Boston Globe editors and reporters, former fellows from the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, and other professionals in the field.

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), journalism. Prospective degree candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing with a minimum of 36 degree-applicable credits completed with required grades. Candidates submit capstone proposals by March 1. Proposals require revisions and must be approved by the capstone advisor by April 1. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements or do not have their capstone proposals approved by the deadline are dropped from the course. See the journalism capstone website for proposal details and approval deadlines.

KORE S-BA
Elementary Korean I

Jee Lee, MA

Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35156

Description
This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. It focuses on the balanced development of interpersonal (communicating), interpretive (listening and reading comprehension), and presentational (formal speech and writing) skills. Students begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul) and then focus on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. In addition, students are exposed to everyday life contexts (for example, language use and culture) likely to be encountered in contemporary Korean society.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35156/2021

KORE S-BAB
Elementary Korean I, II

Hi-Sun Helen Kim, PhD

Director of the Korean Language Program and Senior Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35120

Description
This intensive introductory course provides beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. The course focuses on the balanced development of interpersonal (communicating), interpretive (listening and reading comprehension), and presentational (formal speech and writing) skills, as well as cultural competence. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group and individual speaking sessions, a virtual cultural event, as well as a project on Korean popular music and media to further understand and experience aspects of Korean culture.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 am-1:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35120/2021

KORE S-120
Intermediate Korean

Ahsil Noh, MA

Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34855

Description
This course aims to increase students’ ability to communicate in Korean in a wide range of daily life situations with an equal focus on expanding and consolidating students’ knowledge of the fundamental grammar of Korean. Students are introduced to reading and listening materials of increasing complexity on a variety of topics in modern Korean society and culture. In addition, simple Chinese characters are introduced in order to develop a deeper understanding of the basic structures of the Korean vocabulary. This course is designed to meet the linguistic needs for students to increase deeper knowledge and wider usage of grammar; further develop basic reading, speaking, and writing skills; learn more aspects of Korean culture and society; and understand the structure of Sino-Korean words through introduction of Chinese characters.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 am-1:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Prerequisites: One year of college-level Korean or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34855/2021

LATI S-AA
Beginning Latin

Miriam Leah Kamil, AM

Doctoral Candidate in The Classics, Harvard University

Stephen Shennan, AM

Doctoral Candidate in The Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35169

Description
This beginning Latin course is designed for those who have had no previous instruction in classical Latin. The course covers the equivalent of one semester of college-level Latin and focuses on the acquisition of fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course, students are able to read, with the help of a dictionary, short continuous passages from such authors as Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid. Students who successfully complete the course are equipped to enter into the equivalent of a second-semester sequence of college-level Latin in the following fall semester.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35169/2021

LATI S-AAB
Intensive Beginning Latin

Allison T. Resnick, AM

Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Felipe Soza

Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 31870

Description
This intensive beginning Latin course is designed for those who have had little or no previous instruction in classical Latin and are highly motivated to make accelerated progress in the language. The course covers the equivalent of the first two semesters of college-level Latin. It focuses on the acquisition of fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary so that by the end of the course students should be able to read, with the help of a dictionary, continuous passages from such authors writing in classical Latin as Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid. Those who successfully complete this course should be equipped to enter into the equivalent of a second-year sequence of college-level Latin in the following fall semester.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference

Mondays-Fridays, 10 am-noon and 1-3 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $6800
Undergraduate credit: $6800
Graduate credit: $6800
Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking intensive Greek or Latin. See the department’s website for more information.

Prerequisites: Previous experience of language learning (whether ancient or modern languages) is not required, but may be helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31870/2021

LATI S-104
Ovid’s Metamorphoses

Julia Scarborough, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Amherst College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35004

Description
In this course, students read selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses in Latin, while reading the entire poem in English. We examine the artistry of Ovid’s Latin and consider the ways in which the poet engaged with his Greek and Roman predecessors, from Euripides to Virgil. We also explore the poem’s unique influence on literature and art from Rome to the Renaissance and beyond.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: A minimum of one intermediate-level college Latin course or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 18 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-350004/2021

LING S-73
American Sign Language I

Andrew R. Bottoms, MA

Preceptor in Linguistics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35094

Description
This course is an introduction to the language and linguistic structure of American Sign Language (ASL) and to Deaf culture for students with no prior experience. Focus is on gaining a foundation for later fluency and understanding the role of ASL in Deaf history, current culture, education, bilingualism, and research.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35094/2021

LING S-101
The Science of Language: An Introduction

Kevin M. Ryan, PhD

Professor of Linguistics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35108

Description
This course is an introduction to the study of linguistics as a science. It introduces several components of grammar (morphology, syntax, phonology, phonetics, and semantics) and surveys methods, findings, and theories of linguistic research on the sound system and the structures of human language.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35108/2021

LING S-120
Introduction to Historical Linguistics

Jeremy Rau, PhD

Professor of Linguistics and of the Classics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33194

Description
This course is an introduction to historical linguistics, the study of language change over time. It covers the fundamental aspects of language change (semantic, phonological, morphological, and syntactic), as well as the techniques and procedures involved in investigating these changes. Students study the comparative method, learn how to demonstrate or refute genetic relationships between languages, and try their hand at reconstruction of prehistoric phases of languages. The course further addresses the issues of long-range comparisons, externally (socially) and internally (structurally) motivated language change, and language contact. More culturally oriented topics, such as evolution of writing, decipherment of forgotten writing systems, and language and prehistory (linguistic paleontology) are likewise explored.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33194/2021

LSTU S-100
Introduction to Law and Contemporary Legal Debates

Sharon Fray-Witzer, JD

Lecturer in Philosophy, Brandeis University

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 33658

Description
This course asks what law is—how it relates both to moral concepts and to society. Students read leading legal philosophers and legal opinions in actual cases then truly argue those cases, including some cases which are before the United States Supreme Court right now. Along the way, the course explores how we justify and limit the assignment of criminal responsibility, the death penalty, a duty to rescue, torture, international law, the concept of property, race-based admissions, the right to privacy (including marriage and reproductive rights, as well as rights of privacy related to cell phones and computers), pornography, and free speech as it relates to racism, pornography, political donations, and disinformation. In writing assignments, students assume the roles of judges or legislators. They emerge with a better understanding of their world and how to craft a persuasive argument.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33658/2021

LSTU S-114
Higher Education Law and Policy

Gregory Haile, JD

President, Broward College

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34414

Description
This course offers the opportunity to consider legal and policy matters in a context which every student has experienced, whether they realize it or not. Via collaborative class discussions, small group discussions, videos, the analysis of meaningful and current texts and articles, and keynote speakers, we examine the goals, governance, norms, and ideals of American institutions of higher education and address the nature and establishment of colleges and universities; the relationship of colleges to local, state, and federal governments; and seminal case law and pending legislation. We address important and contemporary issues related to undocumented students; Title IX and sexual assault on college campuses; the academic freedom rights of faculty; the rights of students to be free from discrimination based on race, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity; affirmative action; student debt; and shootings on college campuses. We focus on real time issues with imminent impact on the higher education landscape. The legal and policy issues discussed in this course serve as a gateway to a broader discussion of the role and meaning of higher education in today’s society.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34414/2021

LSTU S-124
The History of Law in Europe

Tamar Herzog, PhD

Monroe Gutman Professor of Latin American History and Professor of History, Harvard University and Affiliated Faculty Member, Harvard Law School

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 35155

Description
This course examines the history of law in Europe (including both England and the continent, as well as Europe’s overseas domains) from the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century to the present day. Organized chronologically, the course engages with the sources of law, the organization of legal systems, and the relations between law and society. We discuss primary, historical sources that highlight the particularities of distinct moments in that long historical trajectory, as well as discuss some of the main dilemmas facing European law today.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35155/2021

LSTU S-131
Start-ups from the Perspective of Business and IP Law

Tiffany Nichols, JD

Doctoral Candidate in the History of Science, Harvard University and Patent Attorney

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34451

Description
This course covers the intersection between start-ups, entrepreneurship, and intellectual property (IP) law. Students gain skills with navigation of major tenets of intellectual property law including patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets as these concepts relate to start-ups and entrepreneurship. Students also gain experience in presenting shark tank and more formal pitches which incorporate references to the IP holdings of start-ups or small businesses. Further, students receive an introduction to the basics of contract instruments which allow for sharing of IP with entities outside of a start-up while protecting the IP of the start-up. Lastly, students are exposed to the IP litigation landscape which start-ups face using actual litigation matters. For example, students are provided with an overview of discovery and gain deposition skills through a hands-on approach. Upon completing the course, students are able to perform basic legal research, understand basic case law, and interpret basic legal documents, such as patent applications and simple confidentiality agreements, which are relevant to start-ups during their funding and growth periods.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34451/2021

MATH S-AR
Precalculus Mathematics

Srdjan Divac, MA

Lecturer on Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30389 | Section 2

Description
A review of algebra is integrated into the study of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Taught in small sections, the course emphasizes applications and problem solving and provides preparation for calculus and basic science. Graphing calculators are used, though no previous calculator experience is required.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 4:45-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of algebra, as demonstrated by a satisfactory score on the math placement test.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33089/2021

MATH S-AR
Precalculus Mathematics

Srdjan Divac, MA

Lecturer on Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30388 | Section 1

Description
A review of algebra is integrated into the study of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Taught in small sections, the course emphasizes applications and problem solving and provides preparation for calculus and basic science. Graphing calculators are used, though no previous calculator experience is required. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 10-11:30 am

Required seminar for graduate-credit students Thursdays, 4-5:30 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of algebra, as demonstrated by a satisfactory score on the math placement test. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30388/2021

MATH S-1A
Calculus I

Carolyn Gardner-Thomas, PhD

Assistant Director, Mathematics for Teaching Program, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30391

Description
This course covers differential and integral calculus in one variable, with applications. We aim to develop conceptual understanding, computational skills, and the students’ ability to apply the material to science. The topics covered overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. A graphing calculator can occasionally be useful. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of algebra, functions, logarithms, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Placement test required. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School’s mathematics for teaching.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30391/2021

MATH S-1B
Calculus II

Matthew F. Demers, PhD

Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30393 | Section 1

Description
Galileo wrote that “the book of the universe is written in the language of mathematics.” Speaking the language of modern mathematics requires fluency with the topics of this course: infinite series, integration, and differential equations. The course aims to balance applications and theoretical understanding. Graphing calculators can help with understanding certain concepts and are recommended, but exams do not require them. The topics covered are not identical to those of a BC advanced placement class, but do overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of first semester calculus including the trigonometric functions, logarithmic functions and differentiation, and an acquaintance with integration, or satisfactory score on the math placement test. Graphing calculators with the capability of computing (approximating) definite integrals are required. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30393/2021

MATH S-1B
Calculus II

Robin Gottlieb, MSc

Professor of the Practice of Mathematics, Harvard University

Hakim J. Walker, PhD

Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35202 | Section 2

Description
Galileo wrote that “the book of the universe is written in the language of mathematics.” Speaking the language of modern mathematics requires fluency with the topics of this course: infinite series, integration, and differential equations. The course aims to balance applications and theoretical understanding. Graphing calculators can help with understanding certain concepts and are recommended, but exams do not require them. The topics covered are not identical to those of a BC advanced placement class, but do overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of first semester calculus including the trigonometric functions, logarithmic functions and differentiation, and an acquaintance with integration, or satisfactory score on the math placement test. Graphing calculators with the capability of computing (approximating) definite integrals are required. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35202/2021

MATH S-3
Quantitative Reasoning: Practical Math

Graeme D. Bird, PhD

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34186

Description
This course reviews basic arithmetical procedures and their use in everyday mathematics. It also includes an introduction to basic statistics covering such topics as the interpretation of numerical data, graph reading, hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression. No previous knowledge of these tools is assumed. Recommendations for calculators are made during the first class.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $1000
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A willingness to (re)discover math, appreciate its practical uses, and enjoy its patterns and beauty.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 150 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34186/2021

MATH S-21A
Multivariable Calculus

Oliver Knill, PhD

Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30189

Description
To see how calculus applies in situations described by more than one variable, we study vectors, lines, planes, and parameterization of curves and surfaces; partial derivatives, directional derivatives, and gradients; optimization and critical point analysis, including the method of Lagrange multipliers; integration over curves, surfaces, and solid regions using Cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; vector fields, and line and surface integrals for work and flux; and the divergence and curl of vector fields together with applications.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Two semesters of calculus. Placement test recommended.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30189/2021

MATH S-21B
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Robert Winters, PhD

Lecturer in Mathematics, Concourse, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Summer 7-week session | CRN 30190 | Section 1

Description
Matrices provide the algebraic structure for solving myriad problems across the sciences. We study matrices and solutions to systems of linear equations as part of understanding linear transformations and general linear spaces. Using the notions of orthogonality, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, we find least-squares solutions, solve discrete and continuous dynamical systems using exact methods and phase-plane analysis, introduce the Spectral Theorem and Fourier series, and analyze different types of differential equations.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time.

Prerequisites: MATH E-1b. Knowledge of partial derivatives is helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30190/2021

MATH S-21B
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

David Freund, PhD

Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35144 | Section 2

Description
Matrices provide the algebraic structure for solving myriad problems across the sciences. We study matrices and solutions to systems of linear equations as part of understanding linear transformations and general linear spaces. Using the notions of orthogonality, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, we find least-squares solutions, solve discrete and continuous dynamical systems using exact methods and phase-plane analysis, introduce the Spectral Theorem and Fourier series, and analyze different types of differential equations.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: MATH E-1b. Knowledge of partial derivatives is helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35144/2021

MATH S-23A
Linear Algebra and Real Analysis I

Samuel Kaplan, PhD

Professor of Mathematics, University of North Carolina Asheville

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34872

Description
This course is an integrated treatment of linear algebra, real analysis, and multivariable differential calculus, with an introduction to manifolds. Students are introduced to higher-level mathematics and proof-writing.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, noon-2:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: MATH S-1b or MATH E-16, or a grade of 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement Examination.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34872/2021

MATH S-101
Sets, Groups, and Topology

Dusty Grundmeier, PhD

Associate Senior Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

Voula Collins, PhD

Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35145

Description
This course is an introduction to abstract mathematical thought and proof techniques, via topics including set theory, group theory, analysis, and topology.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: An interest in mathematical reasoning. Acquaintance with algebra, geometry, and/or calculus is desirable.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35145/2021

MATH S-139
Reading Euclid’s Elements in Greek

Paul G. Bamberg, DPhil

Senior Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

Julia Scarborough, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Amherst College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34490

Description
Using the online Perseus database of classical texts, students learn a subset of Koine Greek that is sufficient to read the theorems and proofs in Euclid’s Elements, Books 1-4. The course also explores, in English, non-Euclidean geometry and modern alternatives to Euclid’s five postulates. Class time is divided roughly equally between mathematics and language.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of high school geometry. Desirable background: some familiarity with axiomatic mathematics and acquaintance with an inflected Indo-European language (for example, Latin, German, Russian, French, or Spanish). No knowledge of Greek is assumed.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34490/2021

MATH S-152
Discrete Mathematics

Paul G. Bamberg, DPhil

Senior Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

William C. Burke, SM

Teaching Assistant in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34491 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to finite groups, finite fields, logic, finite topology, combinatorics, and graph theory. A recurring theme of the course is the symmetry group of the regular icosahedron. Elementary category theory is introduced as a unifying principle. Taught in a seminar format: students gain experience in presenting proofs.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Elementary knowledge of vectors, 2 x 2 matrices and determinants. MATH S-21b would be ideal. Placement test recommended. Calculus is not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34491/2021

MATH S-152
Discrete Mathematics

Paul G. Bamberg, DPhil

Senior Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

William C. Burke, SM

Teaching Assistant in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34865 | Section 2

Description
This course is an introduction to finite groups, finite fields, logic, finite topology, combinatorics, and graph theory. A recurring theme of the course is the symmetry group of the regular icosahedron. Elementary category theory is introduced as a unifying principle. Taught in a seminar format: students gain experience in presenting proofs.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Prerequisites: Elementary knowledge of vectors, 2 x 2 matrices and determinants. MATH S-21b would be ideal. Placement test recommended. Calculus is not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34865/2021

MATH S-305
Mathematical Connections: Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry

Andrew Engelward, PhD

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34795

Description
Algebra is often considered the language of mathematics, for good reason. In this class we continue the exploration that began in the Harvard Extension School course MATH E-303 of this rich, fascinating subject, taking on topics involving the form and function of polynomials, such as analyzing polynomials using difference tables (connecting with ideas leading to calculus), and touching on the concept of infinite polynomials. We also investigate sequences and series—arithmetic, geometric, as well as others; explore complex numbers and their geometry; and thoroughly develop trigonometric functions and identities. The class is designed for teachers who will be teaching Algebra 2 classes, or for anyone who wants to learn more about this interesting subject.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A recent course in introductory algebra, such as MATH E-303, or its equivalent, as well as familiarity with K-12 mathematics.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34795/2021

MATH S-325
Extreme Graph Theory and Combinatorics

John W. Cain, PhD

Senior Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34499

Description
How large must a gathering of people be in order to ensure that either six of the people mutually know one another or that six of the people are mutual strangers? How many rooks (or knights or bishops) can be placed on a standard chessboard such that no two of them are attacking one another? Are there optimal, fair experimental designs by which we may mutually compare thirteen competing brands of fabric softener without having to directly compare all seventy-eight possible pairs of brands? These problems are examples of extremal problems in combinatorics and graph theory, a sub-discipline of mathematics that involves a very different way of thinking relative to areas such as algebra, geometry, and calculus. In this course, we explore some classical extremal (and fun) problems including the ones mentioned above. The methods we develop are applicable to a variety of important practical problems, such as optimal scheduling of flights. Topics are drawn from the following areas: Ramsey theory (classical Ramsey numbers, van der Waerden numbers, and the happy end problem), two-player positional games (tic-tac-toe and the Hales-Jewett theorem, generalized maker-breaker games), and optimal combinatorial designs (balanced incomplete block designs, Steiner triple systems, difference sets, finite projective planes).

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A solid foundation in algebra and geometry, and some exposure to the concept of mathematical proof. Prior exposure to calculus is not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34499/2021

MATH S-327
The Mathematics of Voting

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 35147

Description
This course introduces the fundamentals of mathematical voting theory and how teaching voting theory can be used to engage mathematics students in a unique way. We introduce various voting systems, desirable properties for voting systems, Arrow’s theorem, measures of voting power in weighted voting systems, and apportionment. At the discretion of the instructor, various other topics related to voting theory may be included, such as gerrymandering and detection of voting fraud.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35147/2021

MATH S-332
Mathematical Reasoning: An Introduction to Reading and Writing Proofs

Reshma Menon, PhD

Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 35146

Description
Ever wonder where a mathematical fact comes from or why you should believe it? What does it mean to prove a theorem, and how do people discover or create these proofs? In this course, we see how proofs are build from the basic tools of logic; along the way, we gain a better understanding of mathematical structure. The course follows a discovery approach in which students create mathematical results together via inquiry based learning while focusing on making conjectures and analyzing mathematical arguments.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A solid foundation in precalculus.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35146/2021

MATH S-599
Teaching Projects: Math for Teaching Capstone Course

Carolyn Gardner-Thomas, PhD

Assistant Director, Mathematics for Teaching Program, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33307

Description
This course is intended to give current and aspiring secondary math teachers an opportunity to become engaged in a variety of teaching-related projects. In the first part of the course, participants are given a chance to research a current topic in mathematics education through use of journal articles, giving a presentation of their findings to the math for teaching community. In the second part, participants are asked to investigate how use of a particular technology can be used to enhance classroom math lessons. In addition, everyone gets a chance to participate in an alternative math teaching experiment.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates for the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), mathematics for teaching. Prospective degree candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in their final semester of the program, with successful completion MATH S-1a or MATH E-15 or prior approval of the instructor. Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

MBB S-102
Becoming a Brain Scientist: Neuroscience and Psychology Research

Jessica Schwab, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33663

Description
How do scientists study the brain, behavior, cognition, and learning? This course is an introduction to how psychologists and neuroscientists formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and collect and analyze data to learn about nervous system and brain functioning, brain disorders and disease, learning, and behavior. Each student is matched with a research mentor in a Harvard laboratory. Students spend approximately ten hours per week on a project related to the lab’s research. In addition, all students meet weekly as a group to explore topics of interest to researchers in biological science, neuroscience, and psychology, including research ethics and human subjects’ protection, clinical trials, and science communication. Students read both literature specific to their lab experience as well as more general material on research methods and experimental design. Host laboratories conduct research in a wide variety of areas, which may include neuroscience, cognition, brain disorders and disease, mental disorders, and animal behavior.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, 1-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Student selection is conducted by the Harvard Summer School. Students fill out an application when they register for the class. They also need to upload a transcript and letter of recommendation before their application can be considered. (Students will receive instructions for submitting these materials when they register for the course.) Students should register and submit all materials by March 15 for the best chance of admission to the course. Applications are reviewed by lab personnel and the instructor. Students placed in the course are matched with a mentor from a Harvard research lab. Please contact brainscience@summer.harvard.edu if you have questions about this course.

Prerequisites: Students must have completed their junior year in high school.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33663/2021

MGMT S-10
HBS CORe: Business Analytics, Economics for Managers, and Financial Accounting

Other | CRN 33543

Description

CORe stands for Credential of Readiness and is offered through Harvard Business School (HBS) Online. CORe is a primer on the fundamentals of business and is designed for students just getting started in the business world. Developed and taught by Harvard Business School faculty, this course covers business analytics, economics for managers, and financial accounting. The business analytics portion is taught by Janice Hammond and introduces quantitative methods used to analyze data and make better management decisions. The economics for managers portion is taught by Bharat Anand and includes the topics of customer demand, supplier cost, markets and competition, pricing, production, and differentiation. The financial accounting portion is taught by V.G. Narayanan and covers concepts such as profit and revenue, and assets and liabilities, and how to prepare and analyze financial statements.

All learning materials and instructor and participant interaction take place within the HBS Online learning environment. Although the professors do not have direct real-time interaction with students, they have developed short video lectures, cases, exercises, and other interactive learning elements to create a highly engaging educational experience. Participants typically learn as much (if not more) from thoughtful participation and from peers in this active learning ecosystem as they do from faculty content. For more information see HBS Online’s CORe.

Class Meetings:
Online
Start Date: May. 18, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3760
Credits: 8

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

This course is graded pass/fail with grades of high honors, honors, pass, or fail. Extension of time (EXT) grades are not available. Harvard University’s Tuition Assistance Plan (TAP) cannot be used. Certain other scholarships and waivers are also excluded. Students registered for MGMT S-10 are considered full time and may not take other Harvard Summer School courses. Admission, registration, refund, make-up exam, and grading polices are determined by the HBS Online CORe administration and have precedence over corresponding Harvard Summer School policies.

  • Start date: May 18
  • Last day to apply: May 10
  • Last day to register: May 13
  • Last day to drop for 100% tuition refund, minus the HBS Online $100 enrollment fee: May 19
  • Last day to withdraw for WD grade: June 23

Prerequisites: To register for this course, students must apply to and be admitted by HBS Online for the May 18, 2021 cohort. Apply now. If accepted, registration transactions must all be done on the HBS Online website; they cannot be done in Summer School online services. For more information, contact hbsonlinesupport@hbs.edu. After registering with HBS Online, students receiving financial aid or any other type of financial assistance (for example, consortium agreements) should contact the Summer School Student Financial Services office at studentfinance@extension.harvard.edu.

MGMT S-540
Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Michael Grandinetti, MBA

Program Development Fellow, Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology, University of California, Berkeley

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35157

Description
This course is designed to teach fundamental principles and best practices and methodologies for creating and scaling a successful, high-impact entrepreneurial venture. The course is highly experiential and action-based. Human-centric design and highly iterative lean/agile methodologies serve as cornerstones for this course. Students are grouped into teams around common interests and the venture creation process is walked through step by step, culminating in a pitch to angel investors and venture capitalists.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Noncredit: $3400
Undergraduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35157/2021

MGMT S-599
Capstone: Entrepreneurship in Action

Henrik Totterman, DSc

Professor of Practice, Entrepreneurship and Management, Hult International Business School and CEO and President, LEADX3M LLC

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34791

Description
This course is intended as the capstone course for the Harvard Extension School’s Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), management, integrating coursework in functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, human resource management, and operations management. It introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses involving the basic direction and goals of a real-world challenge, organization, or capstone client; the social, political, technological, economic, and global environment; the industry and market structure; and the organization’s strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted capstone track candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), management. Candidates must be in good academic standing and have successfully completed the seven core degree-applicable courses and the Harvard Extension School precapstone course, MGMT E-597, in the previous spring 2021 term with a grade of B- or higher. Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34791/2021

MGMT S-1000
Financial Accounting Principles

V. G. Narayanan, PhD

Thomas D. Casserly, Jr. Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34221

Description
Be it a Fortune 500 company, a startup, or a nonprofit, having a solid understanding of financial accounting principles is essential for making critical business decisions. Offered in collaboration with Harvard Business School (HBS) Online, this pre-recorded course covers concepts such as profit and revenue, assets and liabilities, and students learn how to prepare and analyze financial statements. The course covers important accounting principles, such as how to record transactions using journal entries; how to post transactions to accounts; and how to prepare a trial balance, balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement. Other topics covered include analyzing financial statements, and forecasting and valuation. Students emerge with a deeper understanding of the financial accounting methodology and its application in a number of business scenarios. Learning materials and interaction take place primarily within the HBS Online learning environment. Although the professor does not have direct real-time interaction with students, he has developed short video lectures, cases, exercises, and other interactive learning elements to create a highly engaging educational experience. Participants typically learn as much (if not more) from thoughtful participation and from peers in this active learning ecosystem as they do from faculty content. Students who have previously enrolled in HBS Online’s Financial Accounting, MGMT S-10, HBS Online’s CORe, or the HBS Online section of MGMT S-1000, and were still enrolled after the 100 percent refund deadline are not eligible to enroll in this section of MGMT S-1000. They will be dropped from the course. Students cannot count this course toward the HBS Online noncredit CORe or the HBS Online Financial Accounting Certificate. Students may not take both ECON S-1900 and MGMT S-1000 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections meet weekly via live web conference on Tuesdays, 3-4:30 pm, Wednesdays, 7-8:30 pm, or Thursdays, 5-6:30 pm, starting the first week of classes. Registered students sign up for sections (first come, first served) on the Canvas course website starting June 15.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Registration for MGMT S-1000 ends on June 17.

  • Last day to register: June 17
  • Last day to make credit status changes or drop for 100% tuition refund: June 23
  • Last day to drop for 50% tuition refund: June 30
  • Last day to withdraw for WD grade: July 23

Enrollment limit: Limited to 999 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34221/2021

MGMT S-1100
Intermediate Accounting

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33338

Description
This course builds on the fundamentals of financial accounting and reporting learned in introductory financial accounting courses. By the end of the course students should have a good understanding of the preparation and interpretation of an entity’s financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, accounting for complex business transactions, and techniques to evaluate firm performance. Topics include income statement, individual components of assets and liabilities, stockholders’ equity, statement of cash flows, revenue recognition, and accounting changes. Real-life case studies are used to evaluate firm performance.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900 or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33338/2021

MGMT S-1300
Nonprofit and Governmental Accounting

James F. White, MS

Assistant Vice President for Finance and Controller, Berklee College of Music

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34423

Description
This course introduces the fundamentals of accounting for nonprofit and governmental organizations. It emphasizes the issues related to fund accounting, including general and revenue funds, debt service funds, capital project funds, internal service funds, enterprise and fiduciary funds, long-term debt and fixed-asset accounting, and planning and control of cash and temporary investments. Other topics include budgeting, budgetary control and reporting, management control, financial reporting, budgeting and controlling operations, cost determination, strategic planning, program analysis, measurement of output, reporting on performance, full-accrual and modified-accrual accounting, cost determination, tax levies, auditing, and preparation of financial statements.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-1000 helpful but not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34423/2021

MGMT S-2000
Principles of Finance

Bruce D. Watson, MA

Master Lecturer in Economics, Boston University and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32611

Description
This course provides an introductory survey of the field of finance. It examines the agents, instruments, and institutions that make up the financial system of the modern economy, such as bonds, the stock market, derivatives, and the money market. Along the way, standard concepts and tools of financial analysis are introduced: present discounted value, option value, and the efficient markets hypothesis. Recent developments in the field—in particular, the application of psychology to financial markets (called behavioral finance)—are also discussed. The course is designed to equip students with the tools they need to make their own financial decisions with greater skill and confidence. Specifically, we see how insights from academic finance can inform and improve students’ own investing decisions.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-2000.

Prerequisites: High school algebra.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32611/2021

MGMT S-2020
Managerial Finance

C. Bulent Aybar, PhD

Professor of International Finance, Southern New Hampshire University

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33287

Description
The objective of the course is to provide the student with the basic analytical tools required to make value-creating financial decisions. The student is provided with an introduction to theoretical foundations and practical applications in financial decision making. Topics covered in the course include analysis of financial and operating performance, assessment of financial health, financial planning, working capital and growth management, the time value of money, risk-return trade off, valuation of financial and real assets, investment, funding, and distribution decisions in the context of nonfinancial firms.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2000 or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33287/2021

MGMT S-2035
Principles of Real Estate

Teo Nicolais, AB

President, Nicolais, LLC

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33385

Description
This course offers practical, real-world knowledge for investing in real estate. It’s designed both for those pursuing an active career in the industry as well as individuals interested in building wealth through passive real estate holdings. Students learn what really drives land values, and explore how market forces shape their city and where to look for future growth. Students practice spotting investment opportunities in the lifecycles of properties, neighborhoods, and cities. They study the four phases of the eighteen-year cycle which shape the real estate investment landscape. In the second half of the course, students receive hands-on training building financial models, analyzing cash flows, and measuring investment returns. Finally, they learn how entrepreneurs raise capital through debt and equity partnerships and explore strategies for successful investing. No prior real estate background is required.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33385/2021

MGMT S-2037
Real Estate Finance and Investment

Teo Nicolais, AB

President, Nicolais, LLC

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33506

Description
This course presents a toolkit for maximizing investment returns. Students closely examine the four sources of real estate returns (cash flow, appreciation, loan amortization, and tax advantages), which have an impact on their investment strategy. They develop an investment scorecard for scrutinizing new investment opportunities, and practice a rigorous, rational approach to deciding when to hold, sell, refinance, or renovate a property. They study strategies for raising capital from investors and work through examples of successful partnership structures. Finally, students learn how to efficiently manage a growing portfolio of cash-flowing assets.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2035 is strongly recommended but not required.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33506/2021

MGMT S-2600
Financial Statement Analysis

James F. White, MS

Assistant Vice President for Finance and Controller, Berklee College of Music

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32615

Description
This course is designed to prepare students to interpret and analyze financial statements for tasks such as credit and security analyses, lending and investment decisions, and other decisions that rely on financial data. This course explores in greater depth financial reporting from the perspective of financial statement users. Students develop a sufficient understanding of the concepts and recording procedures and therefore are able to interpret various disclosures in an informed manner. Students learn how to compare companies financially, understand cash flow, and grasp basic profitability issues and risk analysis concepts. Students apply analytical tools and concepts in competitor analysis, credit and investment decisions, and business valuation. Ultimately students who complete this course develop a more efficient and effective approach to researching, interpreting, and analyzing financial statements.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm, or on demand.
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-1000 and MGMT S-2000 or the equivalent required; MGMT S-1600 and MGMT S-2020 helpful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32615/2021

MGMT S-2620
Business Analysis and Valuation

Ned Gandevani, MBA, PhD

Senior Investment Specialist, WestPark Capital Investment Banking

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33335 | Section 1

Description
Financial statements are important sources of insight as to the financial health, prospects, and value of a company. But just how accurate are these reports? Is management’s view trustworthy or biased? What are the warnings? This course introduces a framework for the analysis of financial statements and financial plans, with particular focus on their usefulness in valuing and financing companies and evaluating corporate and management performance.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900. MGMT S-2020 or MGMT S-2700 are helpful but not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33335/2021

MGMT S-2620
Business Analysis and Valuation

Ned Gandevani, MBA, PhD

Senior Investment Specialist, WestPark Capital Investment Banking

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35179 | Section 2

Description

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900. MGMT S-2020 or MGMT S-2700 are helpful but not required.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35179/2021

MGMT S-2700
Corporate Finance

Gregory Sabin, DBA

Senior Lecturer on Accounting, Questrom School of Business, Boston University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33795

Description
The goal of this course is to develop skills for making corporate investment decisions and for analyzing risk. Topics include discounted cash flow and other valuation techniques; risk and return; capital asset pricing model; corporate capital structure and financial policy; capital budgeting; mergers and acquisitions; and investment and financing decisions in the international context, including exchange rate/interest rate risk analysis.

Class Meetings:
Online (live or on demand) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am, or on demand.

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions on demand. The recorded sessions are available within 24 hours of the class meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900, MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33795/2021

MGMT S-2725
Global M&A Design: Digital Business Model Innovation and Cross-Border Deals

C. Bulent Aybar, PhD

Professor of International Finance, Southern New Hampshire University

Thorsten Feix, PhD

Professor of Mergers and Acquisitions, University of Applied Sciences, Augsburg, Germany

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 34428

Description
In rapidly evolving markets and industries with patterns of digital disruption, business model innovation, and global value chain strategies are paramount to increasing shareholder value and propelling growth. Business strategies have to be sensitive to their specific ecosystem and should be tailor-made. Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are a specific approach to leverage growth and value by redesigning corporate portfolios or by creating a competitive advantage at the business unit level. The dark side of these strategies is that they have significant risk profiles, and they tend to underdeliver on promised synergies and may seriously diminish shareholder value. This course focuses on the strategic and technical challenges of M&A process in the international context and offers a rich toolbox for prospective analysts and managers.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: ECON S-190, MGMT S-2020, or MGMT S-2700 or equivalent courses in finance.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34428/2021

MGMT S-2784
Hedge Funds: History, Strategies, and Practice

Peter Marber, PhD

Chief Investment Officer for Emerging Markets, Aperture Investors and Senior Lecturer on Finance, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35162

Description
While beating the markets was long thought to be impossible, hedge funds have seemingly challenged many financial theories, cracked the mysteries of Wall Street, and made fortunes in the process. They are also one of the fastest growing and least understood areas in the asset management industry. What exactly are hedge funds? How has the sector developed? What do hedge fund managers strive to capture and how do they do it? What are the major hedge fund strategies and their mechanics? What are their hidden risks and unique limitations? How important are hedge funds to investors, regulators, and the public? From both a theoretical and practical perspective, this course is geared to help answer these questions. It surveys the hedge fund industry from its origins in the 1940s, and explores hedge fund strategies including long/short, event-driven, market neutral, relative value, dedicated short-bias, convertible arbitrage, emerging markets, fixed income arbitrage, global macro, managed futures, and multi-sector investing. Students develop an understanding of how hedge fund managers—as well as hedge fund investors—think, operate, and invest. The course tracks a live multi-sector hedge fund portfolio throughout the semester and analyzes current events and price action.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: The course requires a basic knowledge of finance and modest competency in Excel. Prior coursework or work experience in finance would also be useful.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35162/2021

MGMT S-2790
Private Equity

Viney Sawhney, MS

President, Boston National Capital Partners

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33375

Description
This course is the study of private equity money invested in companies that are not publicly traded on a stock exchange or invested in as part of buyouts of publicly traded companies. The main objective of the course is to provide students with the necessary theoretical and conceptual tools used in private equity deals. The course provides the intellectual framework used in the private equity process, valuation in private equity settings, creating term sheets, the process of due diligence, and deal structuring. Other learning objectives include building an understanding of harvesting through initial public offerings or mergers and acquisitions, public-private partnerships, and sovereign wealth funds. The final objective of this course is to show how corporate governance, ethics, and legal considerations factor into private equity deals.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2000, MGMT S-2700, or an introductory accounting course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33375/2021

MGMT S-2795
Venture Capital

Viney Sawhney, MS

President, Boston National Capital Partners

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34120

Description
This course focuses on the venture capital cycle and typical venture-backed start-up companies. It covers the venture fund structure and related venture capital objectives and investment strategies, intellectual property, and common organizational issues encountered in the formation of start-ups. It covers matters relating to initial capitalization and early stage equity incentive and compensation arrangements, valuation methodologies, challenges of fundraising, due diligence, financing strategies, and harvesting. Students critically examine investment terms found in term sheets and the dynamics of negotiations between the owners and the venture capitalist. The course examines the role of venture capitalists in providing value addition during the growth phase for portfolio companies. Alternate financing channels that include incubators, accelerators, crowd-funding, angels, and super-angels are studied in depth. The system of rules, practices, and processes by which start-ups are directed and controlled and the typical dynamics that play out between the venture capitalist and the entrepreneur are an integral part of this course.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34120/2021

MGMT S-3012
The Art of Communication

Mimi Goss, PhD

President, Mimi Goss Communications

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33039

Description
Today’s leaders must convey their messages concisely, confidently, and memorably. This course is for students who want to strengthen their public speaking and writing skills, and develop their authentic voices as professionals. We explore speechwriting, public speaking in victory and crisis, communicating from values, and working with social media and the news media. How can you make every communication a dialogue? How can you advance your goals and those of your listeners? How does speaking from the best of yourself give you confidence? How do you distill a message into one memorable sentence that captures your listeners’ attention, moves your ideas forward, focuses the problem, and helps you achieve your goals?

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33039/2021

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Carmine P. Gibaldi, EdD

Professor of Management, Entrepreneurship, and Organizational Behavior, St. John’s University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33055 | Section 3

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33055/2021

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Edward Barrows, DBA

Managing Director, Duke Corporate Education

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34944 | Section 4

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34944/2021

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Mindy Payne, MBA

Part-Time Faculty in Management and Organization, Boston College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34609 | Section 2

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34609/2021

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Paul Green, DBA

Assistant Professor of Management, McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34231 | Section 1

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Class Meetings:
Online with required weekend meeting
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. Along with the web-conference meetings, this course includes an intensive—and mandatory—online weekend residency. Students must be present for the entire weekend session to earn credit for the course. The course begins via web conference during the first week of the Summer School term, and continues to meet through the week ending August 6. Please see the course website or syllabus for the specific weekly course meeting dates.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34231/2021

MGMT S-4100
Managing Yourself and Others

Margaret C. Andrews, MS

Managing Director, Higher Ed Associates

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35150 | Section 1

Description
Managing others may not be complex, but it is certainly not easy. Simple, straightforward management principles can often be deceptively difficult to implement. This course teaches the fundamentals of management from different angles—managing oneself, managing organizational life, and managing others (managing upward, downward, and sideways). Using a variety of readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and case discussions, the class focuses on understanding individual strengths, preferences, and blindspots—our own and others’—and working with other people to advance career goals and organizational objectives. Management requires judgment and students should expect to grapple with ambiguous situations that do not have simple solutions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35150/2021

MGMT S-4100
Managing Yourself and Others

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35185 | Section 3

Description
Managing others may not be complex, but it is certainly not easy. Simple, straightforward management principles can often be deceptively difficult to implement. This course teaches the fundamentals of management from different angles—managing oneself, managing organizational life, and managing others (managing upward, downward, and sideways). Using a variety of readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and case discussions, the class focuses on understanding individual strengths, preferences, and blindspots—our own and others’—and working with other people to advance career goals and organizational objectives. Management requires judgment and students should expect to grapple with ambiguous situations that do not have simple solutions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35185/2021

MGMT S-4100
Managing Yourself and Others

Michele Jurgens, MBA, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor, Business Administration, New England College

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34225 | Section 2

Description
Managing others may not be complex, but it is certainly not easy. Simple, straightforward management principles can often be deceptively difficult to implement. This course teaches the fundamentals of management from different angles—managing oneself, managing organizational life, and managing others (managing upward, downward, and sideways). Using a variety of readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and case discussions, the class focuses on understanding individual strengths, preferences, and blindspots—our own and others’—and working with other people to advance career goals and organizational objectives. Management requires judgment and students should expect to grapple with ambiguous situations that do not have simple solutions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34225/2021

MGMT S-4100
Managing Yourself and Others

Michele Jurgens, MBA, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor, Business Administration, New England College

Alan Palmer, MBA

Manager, Interactifs UK

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35188 | Section 3

Description
Managing others may not be complex, but it is certainly not easy. Simple, straightforward management principles can often be deceptively difficult to implement. This course teaches the fundamentals of management from different angles—managing oneself, managing organizational life, and managing others (managing upward, downward, and sideways). Using a variety of readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and case discussions, the class focuses on understanding individual strengths, preferences, and blindspots—our own and others’—and working with other people to advance career goals and organizational objectives. Management requires judgment and students should expect to grapple with ambiguous situations that do not have simple solutions.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

MGMT S-4105
Leading with Authenticity and Purpose

Ayse Yemiscigil, PhD

Research Affiliate, Human Flourishing Program, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35022

Description
Why is it important to develop self-awareness? How can we gain clarity about our purpose in life and at work? This course teaches authenticity and uses case discussions and personal/peer development exercises. It is increasingly important for people to have a clear idea of who they are and their purpose in life in order to navigate their work-life and become confident and inspiring leaders. Authenticity is about the true self; having clarity about and acting based on one’s deepest interests, values, and motivations. This course first introduces students to concepts and themes related to authenticity. It covers cutting-edge scientific evidence on the development of self and identity, motivation, and well-being. Second, the course presents real-world cases of authentic living and leading. Drawing on the experiences of prominent leaders, these cases enable students to learn from practical examples. Finally, students apply what they have learned from the course to their personal development through in-depth self-exploration. Students are also given the chance to use peer coaching. The course aims to promote skills and capabilities for students to understand and develop authenticity in themselves and others.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35022/2021

MGMT S-4150
Leadership

John Paul Rollert, JD

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science, The University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33824

Description
How do you become a leader? How do you maintain a successful claim to leadership? This course aims to answer these questions with lessons drawn from history, literature, politics, and business. The course is highly interactive, and students are expected to discuss and debate the qualities of strong leadership and followership in class and online. Throughout the course, we welcome guest speakers from business, government, politics, and the Harvard faculty to talk about their perspectives on leadership.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33824/2021

MGMT S-4185
Leadership Perspectives

John F. Korn, PhD

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34531

Description
This course explores various models of leadership that have been developed from both a theoretical and practical perspective. The learning objectives of this course are primarily twofold: First, students gain an understanding of the major leadership theories. For each model studied, students are expected to understand the theoretical basis of the model, the strengths and weaknesses of said model, and how to apply the model to practical situations in business and other settings. Second, students explore their personal leadership style through a series of written assignments and classroom activities. These activities enable the student to reflect on how they view leadership as both a subordinate and as a leader. As a result of enrolling in this class, students develop a well-rounded understanding of leadership concepts for use in their own leadership opportunities. Students may not count both GOVT E-1354 and MGMT S-4185 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34531/2021

MGMT S-4225
Negotiation and Organizational Conflict Resolution

Diana Buttu, MBA, JD

Lawyer

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33547 | Section 1

Description
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concept and types of negotiation. It is designed for students who wish to manage individual and organizational conflict and negotiations more effectively based on the premise that those in management positions engage in some form of negotiation daily. Students discuss the meaning, types, and different strategies of negotiation with an emphasis on an integrative, collaborative, win-win negotiation approach. A variety of topics are discussed including, but not limited to, workplace conflict, strategies for diagnosing, alternative dispute resolution, emotional elements in approaching negotiation and conflict resolution, psychological subprocesses, social contexts, individual differences, multiparty situations, and dealing with impasses. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. The course brings out the significance of leadership in approaching and managing a negotiation situation and organizational conflict resolution.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 36 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33547/2021

MGMT S-4225
Negotiation and Organizational Conflict Resolution

Paula Gutlove, MD

Deputy Director, Institute for Resource and Security Studies

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 35171 | Section 2

Description
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concept and types of negotiation. It is designed for students who wish to manage individual and organizational conflict and negotiations more effectively based on the premise that those in management positions engage in some form of negotiation daily. Students discuss the meaning, types, and different strategies of negotiation with an emphasis on an integrative, collaborative, win-win negotiation approach. A variety of topics are discussed including, but not limited to, workplace conflict, strategies for diagnosing, alternative dispute resolution, emotional elements in approaching negotiation and conflict resolution, psychological subprocesses, social contexts, individual differences, multiparty situations, and dealing with impasses. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. The course brings out the significance of leadership in approaching and managing a negotiation situation and organizational conflict resolution.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 36 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35171/2021

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Joshua Brand, MBA

Consultant

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35151 | Section 2

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets—traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35151/2021

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Sharon A. Mertz, PhD

Principal, Red Salt Advisory, LLC

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33361 | Section 1

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets—traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33361/2021

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34242 | Section 4

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets—traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34242/2021

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Mohsin Habib, PhD

Associate Professor of Management, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 32578 | Section 5

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets—traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32578/2021

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Kenneth Baylor, DBA

Principal, Advanced Leadership Solutions, LLC

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33845 | Section 3

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets—traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33845/2021

MGMT S-5015
Applied Corporate Responsibility

Charles Bradford Allen, PhD

Professor of Marketing, Plymouth State University

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 32870

Description
This course examines the role of corporate responsibility as a strategy to improve products, profits, and brand equity. The idea of corporations as simply wealth-creating organizations with no obligations to the environment is no longer acceptable. Globalization and increased transparency of corporate operations have revealed significant variations in how organizations attempt to balance the pursuit of profits and good corporate citizenship. Expectations for measurable progress of corporate environmental programs addressing natural resources, pollution controls, monitoring ethical supply chains, and expanded training of employees are growing globally. Stakeholder expectations have accelerated the need to monetize these initiatives. However, the lack of standardized methodology and metrics has resulted in confusion within many industries, hindering progress. Tracking sustainability progress within organizations has often revealed tremendous opportunities for growth.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32870/2021

MGMT S-5018
Corporate Governance

Summer 7-week session | CRN 32881

Description
Corporate governance—the set of policies, processes, and customs by which an institution is directed—is a topic of increasing importance in strategic management. How a company is governed influences rights and relationships among organizational stakeholders, and ultimately how an organization is managed. This course teaches the fundamentals of corporate governance from a variety of angles—the board of directors, senior management, investors, the media, proxy advisors, regulators, and other stakeholders—and focuses on assessing the effectiveness and execution of governance roles and responsibilities.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32881/2021

MGMT S-5027
Emerging Markets in the Global Economy

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 34435

Description
This course examines emerging countries in the global economy. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and income, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. Many emerging countries lack the necessary resources, capacities, and institutions to manage globalization effectively. In this course, students study the institutions in emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors, such as the government and the NGOs; analyze market opportunities and risks; and examine the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Start Date:

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34435/2021

MGMT S-5030
Project Management

Paul Tumolo, MBA

Managing Director, Edusult

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35181 | Section 3

Description
This course guides students through the fundamental project management concepts, practices, and behavioral characteristics needed to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and nonprofit organizations. Effective project managers possess the skills necessary to manage teams, schedules, risks, budgets, scope, and stakeholders to produce a desired outcome. Students analyze the impact of organizational change management theory and explore project management with a practical, hands-on approach through case studies, team assignments, and individual contributions. A key and often overlooked challenge for project managers is the ability to manage without direct influence, gaining the support of stakeholders and access to resources not directly under their control. Special attention is given to critical success factors required to overcoming resistance to change. The course simulates a project in its project team framework, group accountability, and schedule deadlines.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Experience working in a company or nonprofit is advisable.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35181/2021

MGMT S-5030
Project Management

Eric Pool, EdD

IT Lead and Assistant Professor of Healthcare Administration, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34854 | Section 1

Description
This course guides students through the fundamental project management concepts, practices, and behavioral characteristics needed to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and nonprofit organizations. Effective project managers possess the skills necessary to manage teams, schedules, risks, budgets, scope, and stakeholders to produce a desired outcome. Students analyze the impact of organizational change management theory and explore project management with a practical, hands-on approach through case studies, team assignments, and individual contributions. A key and often overlooked challenge for project managers is the ability to manage without direct influence, gaining the support of stakeholders and access to resources not directly under their control. Special attention is given to critical success factors required to overcoming resistance to change. The course simulates a project in its project team framework, group accountability, and schedule deadlines.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Experience working in a company or nonprofit is advisable.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34854/2021

MGMT S-5030
Project Management

Eric Pool, EdD

IT Lead and Assistant Professor of Healthcare Administration, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35173 | Section 2

Description
This course guides students through the fundamental project management concepts, practices, and behavioral characteristics needed to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and nonprofit organizations. Effective project managers possess the skills necessary to manage teams, schedules, risks, budgets, scope, and stakeholders to produce a desired outcome. Students analyze the impact of organizational change management theory and explore project management with a practical, hands-on approach through case studies, team assignments, and individual contributions. A key and often overlooked challenge for project managers is the ability to manage without direct influence, gaining the support of stakeholders and access to resources not directly under their control. Special attention is given to critical success factors required to overcoming resistance to change. The course simulates a project in its project team framework, group accountability, and schedule deadlines.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Experience working in a company or nonprofit is advisable.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35173/2021

MGMT S-5033
Supply Chain Management

Zal Phiroz, PhD

President, Pier Consulting Group

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33018

Description
From corporate giants to small businesses, the optimization of supply chain techniques and operations practices plays a critical factor in establishing a competitive advantage. This course introduces the concept of supply chain management and identifies industry innovation, methods of cost reduction, and operations optimization techniques. In addition to hosting industry leading guest speakers, the course follows a case study approach to identify the relationship between domestic and foreign goods supply and logistical efficiency, while examining a number of areas including strategic positioning, environmental factors, and effective supply chain growth and development.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33018/2021

MGMT S-5100
Essentials of Management

Carmine P. Gibaldi, EdD

Professor of Management, Entrepreneurship, and Organizational Behavior, St. John’s University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34434

Description
This course introduces the important aspects of managing a business in a global environment. It addresses decision making in connection with communications, marketing, human relations, managing people, corporate social responsibility, and managerial ethics, as well as issues affecting efficiency, and it provides the framework for making sound decisions among competing strategic priorities and objectives. Students weigh the risks and rewards of different types of management decisions while acquiring varied business skills.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34434/2021

MGMT S-5330
Principles and Practices of Fundraising

Frank White, MPhil

Communications Consultant

Jonathan William Schaffrath, MBA

Interim Director of Major Gifts, Harvard Business School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33374

Description
This course is designed for current or aspiring managers, professional staff, and volunteers in the nonprofit sector who want to become familiar with the fundamentals of philanthropy and fundraising. Topics include an overview of philanthropy and its importance in today’s interconnected world; characteristics of nonprofit organizations and their differing fundraising needs and systems; motivations for giving; ethical concerns; prospect research; types of funding sources; capital campaigns; grant proposal writing; solicitation techniques; and internet fundraising. The frameworks that we cover are applicable to different missions, sizes, and types of nonprofit organizations. Please note that this course consists in large part of a simulation in which students join a team representing a fictional or real nonprofit organization and work to prepare a final presentation for potential donors, played primarily by the instructor and teaching assistants. The course is meant to have students experience, as realistically as possible, what it is like to work in a fundraising environment.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33374/2021

MGMT S-5415
Faster Product Launches: The Business Model Canvas

Christina Inge, MS

CEO and Founder, thoughtlight

Summer 7-week session | CRN 35032

Description
The core to building a lasting business is continuously innovating a product that meets the needs of its intended users. The business model canvas is the proven framework that has launched startups that grow and last. In this course, we model and validate new products from marketing to distribution channels, making them launch-ready before being built. Guided by this methodology, students are able to create a product roadmap, a funding model, a distribution model for the product, marketing channels, and consumer personas. In line with the business model canvas framework, students engage with real-world stakeholders throughout this hands-on course. In addition to Steve Blank’s business model canvas, we borrow frameworks from Agile user experience (UX) development, as well as implementing the blue ocean strategy, for a robust and flexible framework for both tech startups and social enterprises.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Experience in startups, product development, design, or engineering.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-35032/2021

MGMT S-5460
Next Generation Business Models: Creating the Next Airbnb

Edward Ladd, PhD

Professor of Entrepreneurship, Hult International Business School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33906

Description
Why is Airbnb more valuable than most hotel chains, even though it is only a few years old and does not own any real estate? Despite its size and growth, why did Uber fail in China? In this course, we explore new ways of creating and capturing value using cutting-edge technologies. These business models can connect people, helping them share goods and services. They can collect massive amounts of information to improve customer value at different points in the sales cycle. They can generate revenue from nontraditional sources. And they can fail. In the course, we discuss a wide range of theories and tools within contemporary internet economics, strategy, and entrepreneurship. Students form teams to develop an idea for a new venture that leverages these theories. Together, we analyze and build the next generation of world-changing business models.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33906/2021

MGMT S-5750
The Art and Science of Decision Making

Robert S. Duboff, JD

CEO, HawkPartners, LLC

David S. McIntosh, MBA

Founder, Creative Business Breakthroughs

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34563

Description
This course helps students become aware of the factors that really influence decision outcomes. Using cases, readings about the latest scientific research, and discussions, students get both practical and academic insights. They should become better at making decisions and much better at understanding and influencing how others decide.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34563/2021

MGMT S-6000
Marketing Management

Shawn O’Connor, MBA

Consultant

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34570 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to managing the marketing activities of an organization: marketing information systems and research, the marketing organizational system, and the marketing planning and control system. Topics include customer and client analysis, market research, product and service planning, pricing, communications, advertising and sales promotion, distribution management, and the development of strategies. The use of marketing concepts and tools by nonprofit organizations is also discussed.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

MGMT S-6000
Marketing Management

Susan Hughes-Isley, PhD

Assistant Professor of Speech Communication/Journalism, Perimeter College, Georgia State University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34220 | Section 2

Description
This course is an introduction to managing the marketing activities of an organization: marketing information systems and research, the marketing organizational system, and the marketing planning and control system. Topics include customer and client analysis, market research, product and service planning, pricing, communications, advertising and sales promotion, distribution management, and the development of strategies. The use of marketing concepts and tools by nonprofit organizations is also discussed.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34220/2021

MGMT S-6000
Marketing Management

Marcus Collins, MBA

Lecturer of Marketing, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Summer 3-week session I | CRN 33650 | Section 3

Description
This course is an introduction to managing the marketing activities of an organization: marketing information systems and research, the marketing organizational system, and the marketing planning and control system. Topics include customer and client analysis, market research, product and service planning, pricing, communications, advertising and sales promotion, distribution management, and the development of strategies. The use of marketing concepts and tools by nonprofit organizations is also discussed.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Undergraduate credit: $3400
Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33650/2021

MGMT S-6040
International Marketing

Nicholas Nugent, Sr., PhD

Summer 3-week session II | CRN 32581

Description
This course explores the development of international marketing programs, from the determination of organizational objectives and methods through the execution of research, advertising, distribution, and production activities. Students examine the international similarities and differences in marketing functions in relation to the cultural, economic, political, social, and physical dimensions of the environment. Students also consider the changes in marketing systems and the adoption of marketing philosophies and practices to fit conditions in different countries.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jul. 12, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32581/2021

MGMT S-6100
Branding Strategy

Thomas Murphy, MBA

Associate Professor of Practice, Graduate School of Management, Clark University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33505

Description
This course covers the principles and practices of brand management. The course content focuses on applied strategies and tactics used by marketers to build and reinforce successful global brands for products, services, and corporate social responsibility.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: An introductory marketing management course or one year of experience in a management, marketing, or consulting role in a company or nonprofit organization.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33505/2021

MGMT S-6615
Digital Marketing: Foundations and Framework for Success

Andrew M. Blum, MBA

Lecturer in Professional Studies, Columbia University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34731

Description
The digital age has presented new growth opportunities for marketers to develop their brands and foster deeper customer relationships by utilizing e-commerce platforms, understanding the customer journey, creating online advertising including social media campaigns, and measuring effectiveness and efficiency with tools such as Google Analytics. This course teaches the foundations of digital marketing. Topics presented and discussed include e-commerce and website development, advertising including organic search engine optimization (SEO) and paid search engine marketing (SEM), social media, customer relationship management (CRM) and customer journey strategies, and how to analyze the results of a digital program. The aim of the course is to leverage classical marketing practices in a digital environment and to inspire students’ entrepreneurial spirit in order to learn how to successfully compete in today’s market environment.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34731/2021

MGMT S-6630
Sustainability Marketing

Thomas Murphy, MBA

Associate Professor of Practice, Graduate School of Management, Clark University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33345

Description
This course develops the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully market sustainable products and services. At the end of the course students are able to understand the key elements of developing a successful marketing strategy and branding approach for a sustainable market offering. The course also reviews global trends and issues that influence sustainable product success.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: Introductory marketing or management course or one year of work experience in a business-to-business, business-to-consumer, or nonprofit organization.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33345/2021

MGMT S-6655
Social Media Management

Jemalyn A. Griffin, MA

Assistant Professor of Practice, Advertising and Public Relations, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33507

Description
This course offers an in-depth exploration of social media theories and management practices. Students start with understanding prominent theories applied in social media practice and then apply these theories in conducting social media research, executing a social media content analysis, and developing a strategic social media management plan for a real-world organization. They have the opportunity to scrutinize a wide variety of social media tactics, paying particular attention to the unique managerial functions of each. More importantly, students learn the mechanism of social influence and how social media trends are changing the way information flows in our society so that they can comfortably use and effectively leverage emerging social media in the future. In this course, students are able to apply social media management skills and knowledge of social media channels to conduct a social media analysis. In addition, students discuss the use of social media in crises, gain an understanding of setting social media policy, and review ethical and privacy issues surrounding social media marketing. Due to the ever evolving nature of social media, real-time case studies, current trends, and relevant articles are integrated throughout the course and in some cases, supplement or change course assignments.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33507/2021

MGMT S-6750
Marketing Analytics: Fundamental Data-Driven Marketing

Christina Inge, MS

CEO and Founder, thoughtlight

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34807

Description
This course introduces marketing analytics, including web analytics and data modeling. As big data moves into the mainstream, marketers are seeing the opportunity to make the profession more scientific and numbers-driven than ever before. Marketing analytics is one of the largest areas of marketing today. In addition, with measurement at the center of every marketing campaign, marketers have the opportunity to prove the return on investment of their programs with unprecedented accuracy. Yet, this wealth of data can be overwhelming. Every channel has its own metrics, every demographic group’s behavior can be mined for targeting information. What are the numbers that matter? And what are they really telling us? How can we best leverage big data and marketing analytics to optimize results? This course explores the growing role of data in marketing. Taking a two-fold approach, the course focuses on the data of marketing. Students learn how to use the two main categories of data available to marketers: internal, or what is called marketing analytics; and external, or big data. In this course, students learn web analytics fundamentals, creating data dashboards, and predictive analytics. This is a purely data-driven course; it does not teach how to do marketing, it teaches how to use data to target consumers and measure marketing. Using real-world examples and practical exercises, the course allows students to understand the interactions between both kinds of data, and how best to use analytics to improve marketing outcomes, demonstrate return on investment to the C-suite, and create increasingly effective marketing campaigns.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-6000, MGMT S-6615, or the equivalent.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34807/2021

MUSE S-100
Introduction to Museum Studies

Katherine Burton Jones, MA

Director, Museum Studies, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33278

Description
This course provides a behind-the-scenes view of museums from the people who are actively involved in their operations. Students learn about the history and objectives of various types of museums (art, natural history, science, historical, zoological) through panel discussions that involve museum directors, curators, conservators, collection managers, and exhibit designers. The focus is the rich and diverse resources of Harvard University’s museums, but there are also guest lecturers from other local museums. The course is required for students planning to apply to the Extension School’s graduate program, museum studies but is also appropriate for the avid museum-goer who desires a more comprehensive understanding of how museums function.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections Thursdays, 6:30-7:30 pm.Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course MUSE E-100.

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33278/2021

MUSE S-102
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Research in Museum Studies

Jeffrey Robert Wilson, PhD

Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33935

Description
In this interdisciplinary proseminar students develop the writing skills necessary to produce a successful graduate-level research project on a topic relevant to the field of museum studies. During the first half of the course, students read classic scholarly texts in museum studies and complete short assignments designed to hone their use of core elements of academic writing: summary, analysis, argument, counterargument, evidence. During the second half, students write a 10-page research essay that reflects their particular areas of interest within the field of museum studies. In this survey course we study the theory that informs museum practice. In particular, we examine how museums can powerfully mediate encounters with the collective past and reflect the politics of race, class, and gender as well as individual, communal, and national identities. We analyze how museums create meaning and invite interpretation. Furthermore, students draw upon the resources of their local museums as well as Harvard University’s own museums to see how they create what James Clifford has called “contact zones” between specialists (such as artists, researchers, scientists, and scholars) and the general public.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $2900
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. MUSE S-100 recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33935/2021

MUSE S-117
Museum Collections Care

Sara M. Frankel, MA

Collections Manager for the David P. Wheatland Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University

Summer 7-week session | CRN 34211

Description
This course covers the life cycle of a museum object, following an object from accessioning to deaccessioning and all the steps that collections staff and registrars go through to accession, process, document, rehouse, monitor, and deaccession an object. Students perform the work done in institutions by collections managers and registrars, and gain practical experience in the work performed by these museum professionals. Using materials and objects in their homes, students learn how to accession an object into a museum collection, create object records, and document the object by museum standards in the Museum System (TMS) database. Students learn the types of materials used to rehouse objects and design a storage solution for their object. Students evaluate their objects and create condition reports for their objects. They also have the opportunity to loan their object to another institution and prepare an incoming loan agreement. At the end of the course, students deaccession their objects.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 22, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34211/2021

MUSE S-131
Museum Informatics: Leveraging Information to Make Data-Driven Decisions

Katherine Burton Jones, MA

Director, Museum Studies, Harvard Extension School

Summer 7-week session | CRN 33529

Description
Museums have managed large amounts of information for over forty years primarily through disparate systems in siloed departments. It is, therefore, hard to see the connections that would logically be present in managing information about people or objects. This course looks at the data systems in use in museums to explore the relationships that may be present. We include the obvious connections between fundraising and membership to attendance and social media. We also take a deep look at collections management systems to see patterns of giving that may be leveraged if connections were made to other data. We look at this information from the perspective of the museum educator. Assembling information on programs offered, attendance, and evaluations informs current and future programs and ensures their success. However, big data goes beyond bringing information about constituents and visitors together. Digitizing historical collections allows researchers to analyze the information in field notes, specimen records, and the scientific analysis conducted during the field work. Trends can be measured and compared to current data, giving scientists access to information that may be hidden in the paper records. Topics covered include museum data systems, developing an information policy, systems integration, metadata and tagging, and information storage and retrieval.

Class Meetings:
Online (live) web conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm
Start Date: Jun. 21, 2021

Graduate credit: $3400
Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via live web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students see important degree credit information.

Prerequisites: The Harvard Extension School course MUSE E-130 is recommended.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus: http://my.summer.harvard.ed