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2023 Summer Course Archive

AAAS S-110
Africana Philosophy

Teodros Kiros PhD, Associate of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University and Professor, Liberal Arts, Berklee College of Music

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34824 | Section 1

Description
This course examines Africana philosophy as a field of study practiced by professional philosophers of African Descent and non-African philosophers. The course focuses on fundamental dimensions of Africana philosophy: history, method, logic, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, religion, and politics.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

AAAS S-125
Readings in Black Radicalism

Walter Johnson PhD, Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34164 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to some of the key texts and ideas in the history of Black radical thought since the nineteenth century. Key topics include Black anti-slavery and anti-imperialism; Black Marxism; Black feminism; intersectionality; and reparations.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

Ousmane Kane PhD, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Contemporary Islamic Religion and Society and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

AAAS S-20
Introduction to African Languages and Cultures Through Social Engagement

John M. Mugane PhD, Professor of the Practice of African Languages and Cultures and Director of the African Language Program, Harvard University

Francis Akutey-Baffoe MA, Preceptor in African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Taiwo Ehineni PhD, Preceptor in African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35602 | Section 1

Description
This course explores how sub-Saharan Africans use language to understand, organize, and transmit culture, history, and indigenous knowledge to successive generations. Language serves as a road map to comprehending how social, political, and economic institutions and processes develop, from kinship structures and the evolution of political offices to trade relations and the transfer of environmental knowledge. As a social engagement course, we combine scholarly inquiry and academic study with practical experience and personal involvement in the community. Students are given the opportunity to study Africans, their languages, and their cultures from the ground up, not only through textbooks and data sets but through personal relationships, cultural participation, and inquisitive explorations of local African heritage communities. By examining linguistic debates and cultural traditions and interrogating their import in the daily lives of Boston-area Africans, we hope to bridge the divide between grand theories and everyday practices, between intellectual debates and the lived experiences of individuals, between the American academy and the African world. Ultimately, this course aims to bring Africans themselves into the center of the academic study of Africa.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1280 Massachusetts Avenue 360

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ANTH S-1068
Anthropology of Food and Foodways

Gavin H. Whitelaw PhD, Executive Director for the Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35452 | Section 1

Description
Food and eating are not just necessary for life, they are the basis of culture. Through selection, ingestion, and digestion of food, we make the outside world a part of us. It is not surprising then that food and its associated practices have long nourished the discipline of anthropology. This course applies a comparative, anthropological lens to the study of food by examining the connections between what we eat and who we are. Through readings, podcast listening, discussions, and a spectrum of hands-on experiences, including field excursions, we explore the production, distribution, and consumption of food in a range of cultures and contexts. From family meals and dumpster diving to artisanal cheeses and farmers’ markets, the course addresses the ways food shapes not only our relationships with people, but to our environment, our community, and other nations and cultures. We interrogate not only what food is but what constitutes good food. We examine what can, cannot, and should not be eaten; what role food plays in the creation of community and the construction of identity; and the intersection of food activism and social justice. We explore changes to food systems, in particular transformations in food production and distribution, and the impact of industrial diets on the body, lives, and livelihoods. While engaging with debates that animate the anthropological study of food, students draw on readings, audio, and visual sources, and employ empirical methods to research a dimension of their immediate foodscape.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS South S050

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

Stephen A. Mitchell PhD, Professor of Scandinavian and Folklore, Harvard University

Daniel Peter Dalicsek MA, Maritime Archaeologist, Moesgaard Museum

ANTH S-1300
Human Evolution

Abigail Desmond DPhil, College Fellow in Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35599 | Section 1

Description
Who are we, and where did we come from? Often relegated to the domain of unanswerable questions, this course applies scientific methods in service of understanding who humans are, where we came from, and why we do the things we do. We use archaeological, primatological, physiological, fossil, technological, genetic, and ethnographic evidence in service to understanding the human story in deep time, tracking our evolution from seven million years ago until the end of the last ice age.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Northwest Science Building B109

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course is a Summer Seminar. Learn more about Summer Seminars on this page. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

ANTH S-1660
Anthropology and Human Rights

Theodore Macdonald, Jr. PhD, Affiliate of the Department of Social Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35610 | Section 1

Description
This course combines an introduction to the formal, theoretical, and normative structures of human rights with analyses of contemporary case studies. It illustrates several critical human rights issues, debates, and practices that demonstrate the increasing significance of ethnographic field methods and related interpretive analysis. Accepting that agreement on and realization of human rights often require negotiation and compromise, the course illustrates why, and suggests how, realization of many broadly-defined human rights require specific contextualization.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

ANTH S-1662
The Human Market: The Global Traffic in Human Beings

Keridwen N. Luis PhD, Lecturer in Anthropology and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Brandeis University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33520 | Section 1

Description
The course introduces students to the wide range of cultural and ethical questions surrounding the trade in humans. We consider issues ranging from the traffic in women and children to the trade in human organs. We especially explore the cultural, racial, class, and gender issues inherent in transactions in human beings and their flesh. Who is selling their organs on the international market and why? Whose babies go to whom in international adoption, and who decides what the best interests of the children are? Whose bones are sold to museums and medical schools, and what do such transactions mean?

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ANTH S-1663
The Supernatural in the Modern World

Lowell A. Brower PhD, Lecturer on Folklore, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35604 | Section 1

Description
What do our ghost stories say about us, what do our beasts betray about us? Which witches bewitch us, which rumors consume us, and what sense can be made of what haunts us? Restless spirits, alien invaders, wicked witches, bloodthirsty vampires, legendary cryptids, murderous ogres, Illuminati satanists, deep-state conspirators, memetic online menaces: our contemporary bestiary is overflowing with meaningful monsters. Our spine-tingling intellectual task in this course is to analyze the roles that these malevolent entities and the supernatural narratives we tell about them play in our everyday lives, our collective psyches, our communities, our politics, and in the crises we confront as individuals and groups. Are our occult stories allegories of our modern discontents or simply holdovers from our childhood nightmares? Are they symptoms of specific societal crises or representations of timeless pan-human fears? How has the witch hunt, the rumor panic, the standardized nightmare of the group transformed in this meme-ified age of online participatory culture, global interconnection, ecological catastrophe, and fake-news-driven conspiracy thinking? What can we learn about ourselves, our pasts, and our futures by thinking deeply about what scares us the most? And how frightened should we be of what we might find if we dig too deeply into that question? While trembling together in the creepiest Zoom-room on campus, we analyze the supernatural in relationship historical memories, cultural anxieties, folk traditions, spiritual beliefs, physiological sensations, political conflicts, environmental disasters, existential imperatives, and just about everything else under the moon. Because nowhere is safe from the things that go bump in the night, our interdisciplinary journey takes us across time and space into the bellies of various beasts, from the gates of Harvard Yard, to the hills of Rwanda, to the message boards of 4chan, to the proms of rural Pennsylvania, to the ships of the Middle Passage, to the villages of medieval Europe, to the halls of the White House, to your creepy neighbor’s basement, and to the deep dark woods. Our abominable assignments include creative reading responses, the documentation and analysis of frightful folklore, a fearsome final project, and a co-created haunted Harvard virtual tour. Course activities may include local excursions, storytelling sessions, and paranormal experimentation. Enroll if you dare.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ANTH S-1667
The Opioid Epidemic

Jason Bryan Silverstein PhD, Lecturer on Global Health and Social Medicine and Co-Director, Master of Science in Media, Medicine, and Health Program, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35387 | Section 1

Description
More people die every year from opioid overdoses than gunshot wounds and car accidents, and the crisis appears to be worsening and rapidly changing. Making matters worse, understanding the crisis in real time is notoriously difficult, especially since most who overdose do not go to hospitals and death certificates are often unreliable. And while everyone agrees something must be done, what that something is leads us into heated debates over health care spending and harm reduction. While most medical research focuses on the biology of disease, this course takes a biosocial approach to unmask how social factors, economic insecurity, and the availability of massive amounts of pharmaceuticals have become an overdose crisis. We read social scientists, journalists, public health scholars, and first-hand accounts in order to understand the chronic emergencies (such as de-industrialization and despair) behind this acute crisis. By investigating the opioid epidemic in this way, students are encouraged to think boldly and creatively beyond the traditional boundaries of medicine: perhaps someone’s best medicine is a housing voucher, or a testing strip to detect fentanyl. By the end of the class, students understand the social roots of the opioid epidemic and how solutions may be implemented.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 205

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ANTH S-1690
Internet Folklore and Digital Storytelling

Lowell A. Brower PhD, Lecturer on Folklore, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35399 | Section 1

Description
Exploring the wild world wide web of informal vernacular culture being created, transmitted, and adapted by online communities, this course examines the powers, potentials, and peculiarities of internet folklore in relationship to community-building, political engagement, social change, and everyday negotiations of individual and group identity. On our digital journey, we encounter viral videos, meme warriors, urban legends, occult folk beliefs, disinformation campaigns, and viral challenges, while examining connections between contemporary online culture and ancient storytelling traditions. What new folk groups, storytelling genres, and political potentialities are arising as a result of online engagement? What are the creative, destructive, and ambivalent capacities of online participatory culture, and how are they being harnessed in projects of future-making? Course assignments invite students to research, analyze, and participate in digital storytelling in an attempt to better understand ourselves and our historical moment through folkloristic engagement.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

APMA S-115
Mathematical Modeling

Zhiming Kuang PhD, Gordon McKay Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33607 | Section 1

Description
Mathematical models are ubiquitous, providing a quantitative framework for understanding, prediction, and decision making in nearly every aspect of life, ranging from the timing of traffic lights, to the control of the spread of disease, resource management, and sports. They also play a fundamental role in all natural sciences and increasingly in the social sciences as well. This course provides an introduction to modeling through in-depth discussions of a series of examples, and hands-on exercises and projects that make use of a range of continuous and discrete mathematical tools.

Prerequisites: MATH S-21a and MATH S-21b or permission of instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Pierce Hall 301
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

ARAB S-Aa
Elementary Arabic

Richard Cozzens EdM, Preceptor in Arabic, Harvard University

Amr Madi PhD, Preceptor in Arabic, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35121 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to the Arabic language as it is used by native speakers, with attention to spoken Arabic and the formal register. Emphasis is placed on developing communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and intercultural competence in relation to Arab cultures, including products, practices, and perspectives. Students successfully completing the course should reach novice-mid or novice-high proficiency in Arabic.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

ASTR S-30
A Short Tour of the Universe Guided by Einstein and Others

Arvind Borde PhD, Senior Professor of Mathematics and Physics, Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33190 | Section 1

Description
This course discusses what we understand of the universe, guided by those who have shaped our understanding. Each week, we use as a springboard one or more key papers by Einstein, Penrose, Hawking, Guth, and others, and discuss the main ideas in them. All the background information needed to understand these ideas is provided in detail.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry. An introductory physics course would be helpful.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

ASTR S-35
Fundamentals of Contemporary Astronomy: Frontiers of Current Research

Rosanne Di Stefano PhD, Lecturer on Astronomy, Harvard University and Senior Astrophysicist, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31194 | Section 1

Description
Astronomers are making exciting discoveries every day. Some of these discoveries change the way we understand the universe. During the past twenty-five years, we have discovered roughly 5,000 exoplanets, or planets orbiting other stars. Just over twenty years ago, the systematic study of supernovae explosions led to the discovery of a new and still not understood component of the universe called dark energy. In 2016, gravitational radiation was detected for the first time, allowing us to detect the mergers of distant black holes. In this course we select five areas of current research and use these to introduce and study the basic concepts of astronomy. The course is designed to help students get a feel for what it is like to be an astronomer, using the new generation of ground- and space-based telescopes, combined with sophisticated theoretical techniques and computational facilities. As we study each aspect of the universe, we ask how we came to know what we know today and how astronomers are investigating still-unanswered questions.

Prerequisites: High school algebra; some physics background is useful but not necessary.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

ASTR S-41
The Life and Death of Stars and Their Planets

Jason Eastman PhD, Lecturer on Astronomy, Harvard University and Research Associate, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian

Allyson Bieryla ALM, Manager of the Astronomy Lab and Clay Telescope, Harvard University and Astronomer, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35166 | Section 1

Description
From old, humanity has wondered about the stars and what is out there in space. In the beginning, humans focused on visual ways to find and convey those answers, but in roughly the last century, astronomers have developed various techniques to explore, discover, and convey in-depth information about the mysteries of the universe. In this course students learn about the life and death of stars while focusing on how the death of a star is involved in the generation of more stellar wonders and even life in the universe. We use telescopes to obtain our own data and apply state-of-the-art computer code to model and characterize real stars and their planets. This is an interactive, in-depth astronomy course covering introductory themes.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry. An introductory physics course would be helpful.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center 804

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

ASTR S-80
Planets, Moons, and Their Stars: the Search for Life in the Cosmos

Alessandro Massarotti PhD, Associate Professor of Physics, Stonehill College and Associate of the Department of Astronomy, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34550 | Section 1

Description
Astrobiology is a new discipline born out of the convergence of all scientific inquiry currently under way on the question of the origin and development of life here on Earth, and potentially elsewhere in the universe. Recent advances in planetary exploration, astronomy, geochemistry, and biochemistry are leading to a revolution in our ideas on the emergence of life on our own planet and the likelihood of finding life outside the Earth. In particular, much is being learned about Mars and Venus because of the many recent and ongoing space missions. Spectacular data from Jupiter’s and Saturn’s moons, like Titan, Europa, and Enceladus, show that these moons may become possible targets of future searches for life. Geochemists are finding more and more intriguing clues about the Earth’s past by analyzing rocks dating from the very first period after the Earth’s formation, thus providing a fundamentally new context for research on the transition between chemistry and primordial life. And the search for extra-solar planets is leading to the discovery of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. In this course, students are introduced to current and planned telescopic space missions aimed at finding and characterizing exoplanets and robotic missions, such as the Mars rovers. The course also covers current ideas about the role of stars and their evolution in the habitability of planets and in the chemistry of galaxies.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 1 Story Street 304
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

BIOS S-10
Introduction to Biochemistry

Alain Viel PhD, Senior Lecturer on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32376 | Section 1

Description
This course is an integrated introduction to the structure of macromolecules and a biochemical approach to protein function. The organization of macromolecules is addressed through a discussion of their hierarchical structure and a study of their assembly into complexes responsible for specific biological processes. Topics addressing protein function include enzyme kinetics, the characterization of major metabolic pathways, and their interconnection into tightly regulated networks. Current laboratory techniques are discussed during lecture and examples showing the organization of protein networks and disease-linked protein profiles are drawn from proteomic studies. The laboratory portion of the course exposes students to a broad range of experimental approaches, including affinity purification, enzyme kinetics, analysis of protein folding, and stability. The laboratory exercises are designed to give students a direct experience of research conducted in a modern laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Northwest Science Building B101
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 74 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-12
Principles and Techniques of Molecular Biology

Alain Viel PhD, Senior Lecturer on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32378 | Section 1

Description
The course addresses both the fundamental principles and techniques of molecular biology. Students gain an in-depth knowledge of nucleic acid structure, molecular genetics, and the biochemistry of transcription and protein synthesis. Other topics include how mechanisms of gene regulation play a role in retroviral pathogenesis and embryonic development. Each lecture directly relates molecular biology to current laboratory techniques. Virtual laboratory sessions, using LabXchange, a free Harvard educational platform are included, These virtual laboratory sessions provide students with a broad exposure to several important techniques in molecular biology. Virtual experiments include current approaches to mutation analysis, protein interaction assays, and recombinant cDNA cloning by PCR.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

BIOS S-129
Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

Julie Park PhD, Lecturer on Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University

Amie Holmes PhD, Lecturer on Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35359 | Section 1

Description
We are entering a new era in which a fundamental understanding of developmental biology and regeneration plays a critical role. In this course, embryonic and adult stem cells in different organisms are examined in terms of their molecular, cellular, and potential therapeutic properties. Genetic reprogramming and cloning of animals are critically evaluated. Ethical and political considerations are also considered.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent. Knowledge of cell, molecular, or developmental biology is recommended.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

BIOS S-14
Principles of Genetics

Steven Theroux PhD, Professor of Biology, Assumption University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32374 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on transmission and molecular genetics. Topics include chromosome structure and replication, genetic linkage and mapping, regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, epigenetics, genetic mutation, genetics of cancer, and the principles of genetic engineering. The course makes use of bioinformatics to explore gene function, and pertinent applications of bioinformatics and genetics to modern biological problems are discussed.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Science Center E
Optional sections Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-4 pm.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

BIOS S-140
An Introduction to Evolutionary Genetics in Epidemiology

Diddahally R. Govindaraju PhD, Visiting Professor, Institute for Aging, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Amy Tsurumi PhD, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35597 | Section 1

Description
Evolutionary processes underscore the origin and distribution of inherited variation among populations across generations. They are influenced by Malthusian (demographic), Darwinian (natural selection), Mendelian (laws of inheritance), and ecological (environmental) factors. Each of these factors and their components independently or collectively influence the differential survival and reproduction of individuals among all populations of organisms, including humans, defined as evolutionary processes. On the other hand, as a branch of public health epidemiology also deals with the causes, incidence, distribution, and control of communicable and non-communicable diseases within and among populations. Thus, both evolutionary genetic and epidemiological factors influence health as well as orchestrate the origin and distribution of most diseases. In this course, we explore the interfaces of evolutionary genetics and epidemiology in relation to environmental factors (including global warming) in the context of precision medicine.

Prerequisites: Basic algebra skills are expected. Some prior exposure to genetics and statistics would be helpful.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 204

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

BIOS S-15
Animal Transgenesis: A Laboratory Primer on Genetics

Seung Kim MD, KM Mulberry Professor of Developmental Biology, Medicine and Pediatrics (Endocrinology), Stanford University School of Medicine

Lutz Kockel PhD, Basic Life Resident Scientist, Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine

Nicole Lantz BS, Science Instructor, The Lawrenceville School

Arjun Rajan BS, Graduate Student, Stanford University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35453 | Section 1

Description
This lab-based course uses the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to introduce students to experimental biology and the wonder of scientific discovery. It teaches the use of modern molecular biology methods, Mendelian genetics, and immuno-histochemistry to characterize novel fruit fly strains. Students isolate genomic DNA and perform standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inverse PCR, in addition to learning DNA primer design. These methods are applied to clone a lexA-based enhancer trap in the Drosophila genome and the novel data is analyzed using standard bioinformatics tools. Students characterize the expression pattern of their lexA enhancer trap, apply immunohistochemistry, and analyze via epifluorescence microscopy. Students also perform fly intercrosses and are introduced to the existing tool kit of meiotic recombination suppression in Drosophila. Further genetic methods, such as the UAS (upstream activation sequence)/Gal4 and lexA/lexAop binary expression systems, are used. Some class time is devoted to teaching underlying biological and experimental principles that students then apply. At the end of the course, students give scientific presentations, summarizing their findings.

Prerequisites: Completion of Advanced Placement biology or introductory college-level biology. No prior experience with experimental biology is required. Students must submit a petition (maximum 3,000 characters) to enroll when adding this course to their cart. This petition will serve as a statement of interest, explaining the student’s relevant experience and reasons for wanting to take this courses. Students also need to upload a transcript via MyDCE (choose Document Uploader and BIOS S-15 Transcript Upload) before their application can be considered. Students should submit all materials by April 18 for the best chance of admission to the course. Applications are reviewed by lab personnel and the instructor. Once a decision had been made on the application, students will see in their carts whether the petition has been approved or denied.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Biological Laboratories B079
Optional sections Wednesdays, 9-11:30 am.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-150
The Biology of Cancer

Steven Theroux PhD, Professor of Biology, Assumption University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33128 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the biology of cancer. We begin by examining the personal, social, and economic consequences of this disease, and then we focus on the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, we study the nature of cancer, the role of viruses in cancer, cellular oncogenes, cellular signaling mechanisms, tumor suppressor genes, and the maintenance of genomic integrity. We also examine the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, cellular immortalization, tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Finally, we examine how modern molecular medicine is being used to treat cancer.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent, plus an additional college-level biology course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections Mondays and Wednesdays, 3-4 pm.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-1a
Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology

Monique Selina Jennifer Brewster PhD, Lecturer on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Federica Calabrese PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33926 | Section 1

Description
This course leverages problem-solving skills to explore the central principles of molecular and cellular biology, with a focus on structure function relationships, energy, metabolism, and genetics. The emphasis is on cells as systems for the capture and transformation of energy, the processing of molecular information, the relationship between form and function, and cell division. Required laboratory and discussion sections highlight experimental design and allow students to reinforce concepts covered in lecture and develop critical thinking. BIOS S-1a is part of an introductory biology series (BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b) that fulfills the medical school admission requirement of two semesters of biology. (Note: BIOS S-1a is not a prerequisite for BIOS S-1b. Students are welcome to take BIOS S-1b before BIOS S-1a).

Prerequisites: High school mathematics and biology, and college-level or AP chemistry highly recommended. Students are strongly advised to complete the General Chemistry Diagnostic, available on the course website in the spring. The diagnostic is intended to help students decide if they have the chemistry background required for success in the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center A
Required sections Tuesdays, 1:30-2:30 pm. Required labs to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 120 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-1b
Introduction to Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Casey Roehrig PhD, Manager of Instructional Development, Office of the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33927 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces fundamental concepts in animal anatomy and physiology, as well as the origin of life and principles of evolution and ecology. Laboratory sections allow students to reinforce concepts covered in lecture. BIOS S-1b is part of an introductory biology series that fulfills the medical school admission requirement of two semesters of biology.

Prerequisites: High school biology, chemistry, and algebra. BIOS S-1a is not a prerequisite for BIOS S-1b. You may choose to take BIOS S-1b first, or concurrently with BIOS S-1a.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center A
Required three-hour labs and required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 160 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-200
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Biology

Emilie J. Raymer PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35643 | Section 1

Description
This proseminar is designed to teach students many of the writing and analytical skills that are required to succeed in graduate-level courses in the biological sciences. Through critical reading and presentation of research articles, students learn how to form questions that can be addressed experimentally and how to write a corresponding, testable hypothesis. The course also addresses the process of experimental design and current experimental methodologies in biology. Students are given multiple opportunities to hone their writing skills on several short writing assignments. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, present a paper to the class, and write a final research proposal due at the end of the semester. We focus our attention on innovations in genetics and genomics. Some background in these areas is beneficial but not required. Students learn to think scientifically while they gain knowledge of how recent advancements can be applied to agriculture, vaccine developments, personalized medicine, and other areas. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course; molecular biology (BIOS S-12 or the equivalent) and EXPO S-42c are highly recommended.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-208
Precision Medicine in Genomics

Arezou A. Ghazani PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35154 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on the application of genomic science in precision medicine. It explores the path from big data to precision medicine by discussing the utility of novel approaches, methods, and systems in genomic science. Topics include technologies and platforms in genomics, analysis of large-scale data, methods for the interpretation of genomic alterations, data collection and privacy, data ownership, issues for data science applications, and clinical application of data in focused patient care.

Prerequisites: BIOS S-14 or BIOS E-45 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-50
Neurobiology

Edith Julieta Sarmiento-Ponce PhD, Associate of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Oluwarotimi Folorunso PhD, Instructor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35354 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the brain at the level of molecules, cells, circuits, and behavior. Topics include brain anatomy and function; sensory and motor systems; how the brain processes thoughts; how the brain regulates emotions; learning, memory, and attention; neurodiversity; and neurological disorders.

Prerequisites: A college-level introductory biology course or a strong background in biology is recommended for students to be successful in this course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Science Center A
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-61
Introduction to Immunology with Laboratory Techniques

Angela Bair Schmider PhD, Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34508 | Section 1

Description
Immunology is the study of the immune system, the body’s built-in defense system. This course covers an integrated introduction to immunology and uses techniques used in research and diagnostic laboratories. This is a hands-on course with an emphasis on laboratory approaches that illustrate concepts of how the immune system works. The immunological techniques used include identifying proteins in cells using fluorescence microscopy and western blot and analyzing why cells move towards certain chemicals. For example, when diagnosing certain autoimmune diseases, scientists use fluorescence microscopy to look at where proteins reside inside of cells. The laboratory component is a way to observe experiments, learn how to design experiments, and to analyze data. All laboratory exercises are demonstrated during class hours. The non-laboratory sessions cover the theoretical aspects of the practical laboratory approaches and the ways that research is performed to understand immunology. The course also covers how to critically discuss scientific literature and how to create and present scientific data.

Prerequisites: An introductory college biology course, AP biology, or permission from the instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Northwest Science Building B141
Required lab sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-62
Infectious Diseases, Pandemics, and Social Justice

Don Goldmann MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School and Professor of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H Chan School of Public Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35048 | Section 1

Description
Amazing scientific and public health advances have transformed our understanding, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases discoveries so profound that they were unimaginable even a generation ago. Yet the global burden of infections remains prodigious, disproportionately affecting low income countries and vulnerable populations in the United States and other developed economies. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare these stark inequities. This course prepares students to understand and mitigate the impact of current and future infectious diseases and pandemics through the study of major infections, including COVID-19, cholera, malaria, tuberculosis, syphilis, smallpox, polio, and plague. We provide sufficient clinical, biological, and epidemiological background for students to understand why these infections have had such dramatic effects and how they can be controlled. Rather than merely reciting grim statistics and body counts, we illustrate their impact through the lenses of history, literature, film, and drama. We celebrate how these infections have stimulated revolutionary scientific advances, but also explore the darker side of the story. Advances in prevention and treatment have left large segments of the global population behind. Under the veneer of stunning progress lie the realities of stigmatization, bias, exclusion, shameful human experimentation, and social injustice. The COVID-19 pandemic vividly illustrates these historical lessons.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. This course counts for the Science and Technology in Society Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1129. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 72 students

Syllabus

BIOS S-74
Marine Life and Ecosystems of the Sea

Collin H. Johnson PhD, Research Assistant IV, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32373 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the life history and adaptations of marine life and the ecosystems of the sea. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fragility and resilience of marine systems in the face of anthropogenically driven perturbations such as habitat fragmentation, elevated sea surface temperature, non-native species, nonsustainable fishing practices, and increased global tourism.

Prerequisites: One year of secondary school biology.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Science Center 116
Required labs Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

BIOT S-200
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Biotechnology and Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Elizabeth Wiltrout Leary PhD, Senior Program Manager, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Tufts Medical Center

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32666 | Section 1

Description
In this proseminar, we focus on science writing, data interpretation, and collaborative and independent experimental design. Students who successfully complete the course are those who demonstrate an ability to assess information from the primary scientific literature, a command of oral and written communication skills, and the ability to generate a logical progression of experiments to help validate or nullify their hypothesis. Reading materials include publications on scientific writing and experimental design. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: The instructor assumes that students already have undergraduate degrees in an area of life, physical, or computer science, as well as professional scientific training. Scientists coming from a physical or computer science background should successfully complete BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, and BIOS S-12, or their equivalents, before attempting to take BIOT S-200. EXPO S-42c is strongly recommended. Students must earn a satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

BIOT S-212
Vaccines and Clinical Trials

Mihaela G. Gadjeva PhD, Associate Director, Bacteriology, Moderna

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35629 | Section 1

Description
Much is to be learned from our experiences during the recent pandemic. One major outcome is the conviction that there is a need for active vaccine development programs to ensure preparedness. This interactive, discussion-based course is designed to highlight the most recent advances in immunology, microbiology, and vaccinology regarding current and new vaccine developments. Using real-life clinical cases, we make connections between disease manifestations, cellular responses, immunity, and infection, and learn how vaccinology works. We discuss the mechanisms of action of the oldest vaccine in the world bacille Calmette-Gu rin (BCG), which is protective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and how it affects susceptibility to other pathogens such as SARS CoV-2. Next, we examine reverse vaccinology approaches utilized to generate the serogroup B meningococcal (men B) vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis. Lastly, students learn why there are no currently available vaccines against pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or uropathogenic E. coli. Students learn to understand results from past and ongoing clinical trials where vaccines targeting those difficult to handle pathogens are evaluated. We talk about the importance of broadly neutralizing antibodies and how their activities can be leveraged for therapies. The course facilitates greater understanding of challenges and solutions in vaccinology. Students may not take both BIOT S-212 and BIOT S-215 (offered previously) for degree or certificate credit.

Prerequisites: This course is designed for graduate students with prior knowledge of molecular biology and/or immunology.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

BIOT S-225
Biomedical Product Development

Sujata K. Bhatia PhD, MD, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Drexel University College of Medicine

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35555 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the design and development of new therapeutic products. Students learn through case-based studies of product development for pharmaceuticals, biologics, medical devices, and combination therapies. The course describes the steps of biomedical product development, from conceptualization to design, manufacturing, regulatory approval, and commercialization. The course discusses both technical and business factors that contribute to the success or failure of new biomedical products. Appropriate design of preclinical and clinical trials is also included. Students gain an appreciation for emerging technologies in stem cells, gene therapy, tissue regeneration, personalized medicine, and targeted therapies. Additionally, students learn about the special challenges presented by emerging biomedical technologies. By the end of the course, each student completes a project to propose a new biomedical device and identify the regulatory strategy, technical milestones, and business milestones for the new device.

Prerequisites: Background in introductory biology and chemistry.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

CELT S-113
Irish Storytelling

Kate Chadbourne PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35528 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the world of traditional Irish storytelling in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on context, storytellers, community, collectors, collections, and of course, the stories themselves. Storytellers’ biographies, ethnography, proverbs, and live performance give breadth and contour to our understanding of the stories and the world in which they were and are told. Questions of genre, evaluation, gender, nationalism, and identity are also considered.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

CELT S-132
Modern Irish Language and Film

Margo Griffin-Wilson PhD, Teaching Associate in Modern Irish, University of Cambridge

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35529 | Section 1

Description
Students learn to speak Modern Irish (Gaelic) on a beginner’s level, while exploring aspects of Irish culture through Irish language films. Classes include structured lessons on basic Irish grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Oral and listening skills are reinforced by short conversations and recordings of Irish verse and song. A selection of Irish language films (with English subtitles) is viewed in class, with attention to language and cultural issues.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Boylston Hall 103

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-101
Experimental Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Heidi Vollmer-Snarr PhD, Senior Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34861 | Section 1

Description
This is a laboratory course where students carry out chemistry research. Projects are drawn directly from Harvard faculty covering a range of methodologies in chemistry. Students discuss their progress and write formal reports. The course is suitable for students with or without extensive laboratory experience.

Prerequisites: CHEM S-20ab, or Harvard College Chemistry 20/30 or equivalent organic chemistry background, or permission of the instructor. This course is suitable for students with or without extensive laboratory experience.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-5:00pm, Northwest Science Building 158
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 10 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-17
Principles of Organic Chemistry

Timothy J. Brunker DPhil, Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33668 | Section 1

Description
This course is a one-semester (4-credit) introduction to organic chemistry, with an emphasis on structure and bonding, reaction mechanisms, and chemical reactivity. It covers all of the important functional groups and reactivity needed for applications in medicine and biochemistry, including aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, and amides. Students who succeed in in this course are well prepared for the organic chemistry portion of medical school entrance exams and other similar exams. Students who need a full year of organic chemistry (8 credits) should take CHEM S-20ab, which goes into greater depth with extensive coverage of laboratory organic synthesis, spectroscopy, and other topics needed for more advanced study of the subject.

Prerequisites: One year of general chemistry (equivalent to CHEM S-1ab) with a grade of C or better, or equivalent preparation (for example, an AP Chemistry course).

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center B
Friday, July 7, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center B
Required laboratory sections and required discussion sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 150 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-1ab
General Chemistry

Gregg Tucci PhD, Senior Lecturer on Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Justin McCarty MM, Head Teaching Fellow in General Chemistry, Harvard Division of Continuing Education

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30877 | Section 1

Description
This course is a comprehensive survey of chemistry for the general student that emphasizes the principles underlying the formation and interaction of chemical substances: stoichiometry, states of matter, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, intermolecular forces, solutions, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and environmental chemistry. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of inorganic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and chemistry. Students must have access to a printer.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center D
Three required two-hour laboratories, three one-hour discussion sections, and one two-and-a-half-hour review sessions per week to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Students in this section and section 2 of CHEM S-1ab may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-1ab
General Chemistry

Gregg Tucci PhD, Senior Lecturer on Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Justin McCarty MM, Head Teaching Fellow in General Chemistry, Harvard Division of Continuing Education

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35644 | Section 2

Description
This course is a comprehensive survey of chemistry for the general student that emphasizes the principles underlying the formation and interaction of chemical substances: stoichiometry, states of matter, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, intermolecular forces, solutions, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and environmental chemistry. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of inorganic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Prerequisites: High school algebra and chemistry. Students must have access to a printer.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Three required two-hour laboratories, three one-hour discussion sections, and one two-and-a-half-hour review sessions per week to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Students in this section and section 1 of CHEM S-1ab may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-20ab
Intensive Organic Chemistry

Sirinya Matchacheep PhD, Lecturer on Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Instructional Laboratory Programs, Harvard University

Peter B. Hamel MA, Chemistry Teacher, Newton North High School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30609 | Section 1

Description
This course is an intensive, comprehensive introduction to the chemistry of carbon and its importance to living systems. Topics include current ideas of bonding and structure, major reaction mechanisms and pathways, a discussion of the analytical tools used to determine the structure and stereochemistry of organic molecules (such as infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR] spectroscopy), and some of the chemistry of enzymes and cofactors. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of organic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Prerequisites: One year of college general chemistry with a grade of B- or higher. Students without adequate background may not be able to keep up with the course. Not recommended for high school students.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, June 26-August 4, 8:30am-11:45am, Science Center C
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:00am, Science Center C
Required twice weekly labs to be arranged. Required sections Tuesdays-Fridays, time to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 100 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-A
Chemistry in Context

Lu Wang PhD, Senior Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35581 | Section 1

Description
This course is an integrated introduction to general chemistry, taught in a contextual framework of social, environmental, technological, and health issues. It is intended for students with little to no background in chemistry, as well as those who desire to expand their basic understanding of chemistry. The topics covered include atomic structures and properties, stoichiometry, solutions, chemical bonding, energy, thermochemistry, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, polymers, chemical equilibrium, basic acids and bases, and an introductory exploration to the wonders and weirdness of the quantum world that shapes our world.

Prerequisites: No prior background in chemistry is required. Basic knowledge of algebra is helpful.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Required sections Tuesdays and Thursdays, time to be arranged. Required online labs to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-B
The Molecules of Life, Nature, and Industry

Heidi Vollmer-Snarr PhD, Senior Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories, Harvard University

Khaled Abdelazim PhD, Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34797 | Section 1

Description
This introductory course teaches students the fundamentals of organic chemistry through its applications in our everyday lives, exploring topics ranging from materials, energy, and the environment to the human biome, medicine, disease, and the ways molecules influence how we think and feel. Students learn to relate the three-dimensional structure of organic molecules to their chemical and physical properties; to identify functional groups exhibiting patterns of reactivity; to predict products of a reaction in the context of thermodynamics and kinetics; and to hypothesize how molecules will react in different environmental contexts. They learn how to think like scientists and be effective problem solvers skills that are transferable to any future field of study. The course culminates in a final project presentation on a topic of a student’s choice.

Prerequisites: High school general chemistry.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Required sections Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10-11:30 am.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

CHEM S-C
Tackling Real-World Problems Through Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Heidi Vollmer-Snarr PhD, Senior Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Director of Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories, Harvard University

Zachary Tyler Zinsli ALM, Preceptor in Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35454 | Section 1

Description
From early agriculture to today’s most complicated technological systems, chemistry has played a central role in the survival, creativity, and advancement of human society. Whether it is the emergence of the iron and bronze ages, the evolution of our ability to harness energy, explorations of medicinal applications, or how we move around, this course explores the historical significance and modern applications of chemistry and chemical biology. It focuses on the intersections of chemistry with the life, social, and physical sciences, connecting through an analytical chemistry lens. The course is designed to be engaging and enriching for students of all backgrounds. Students learn how to read scientific literature, run experiments using an array of sophisticated instrumentation, analyze data, communicate about experiments, and make connections to the world through chemistry.

Prerequisites: High school general chemistry or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Northwest Science Building B109
Required sections Thursdays, 3:15-4:45 pm.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

Yuxiao Du EdM, Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Fangzheng Zhang EdM, Perceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Ying-Chieh Wang MA, Language Instructor in Chinese, Harvard University

Xiaoshi Yu MEd, Senior Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

CHIN S-Ba
Elementary Chinese I

Wei Wang MA, Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32809 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to basic Chinese grammar, vocabulary, usage, and the writing system for students with little or no background in the language. The course seeks to help students acquire the rudimentary knowledge of Chinese and develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the language. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a good command of the pronunciation system and basic grammar, to be able to conduct daily conversation in simple Chinese, and to read and write short passages. Through learning the language, students gain an initial understanding of some Chinese social and cultural phenomena.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Required sections Tuesdays and Thursdays, time to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

CLAS S-97a
Introduction to the Ancient Greek World

Joseph Emmanuel Glynias PhD, Junior Fellow of the Society of Fellows, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35023 | Section 1

Description
This course covers the civilization of the ancient Greek world, from its origins in the Neolithic period and the bronze age up until the Roman Empire’s conquest of the eastern Mediterranean at the end of first millennium BCE. Students are introduced to major historical developments, social and political achievements and failures, and cultural accomplishments and transformations in the ancient Greek world during this long epoch. Students also consider the long relevance of the ancient Greek world in the premodern and modern Middle East, Mediterranean, and Europe. Topics include Homeric epic, the Greek colonization of the Mediterranean, Persian and Peloponnesian wars, the spread of democratic government and Hellenism, Alexander’s conquest of the Middle East, and ancient Greek religion. Students learn how to interpret archaeological and artistic material as well as literary, historical, and philosophical texts in order to construct an understanding of an ancient civilization as it changed over time, always in close contact with neighboring cultures.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking introductory Greek or Latin, or CLAS S-97a. See the department’s website for more information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

Dimiter G. Angelov PhD, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History, Harvard University

Yota Batsaki PhD, Executive Director of Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University

Sahar Bazzaz PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of History, College of the Holy Cross

Emma Dench DPhil, McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History and of Classics and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Eurydice Georganteli PhD, Lecturer in Art History and Numismatics, Harvard University

Ilham Khuri-Makdisi PhD, Associate Professor of History, Northeastern University

Gregory Nagy PhD, Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Michael Puett PhD, Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History and Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University

David F. Elmer PhD, Professor of the Classics, Harvard University

Bonnie Talbert PhD, Lecturer on Social Studies and Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies for Freshmen and Sophomores in Social Studies, Harvard University

Petra Belkovic Taylor PhD, Executive Director and Professor of Literature and Culture, European Center for the Study of War and Peace

Petra Belkovic Taylor PhD, Executive Director and Professor of Literature and Culture, European Center for the Study of War and Peace

COMP S-116
Big Ideas, Great Thinkers

Thomas Ponniah PhD, Affiliate of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University and Professor, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, George Brown College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35404 | Section 1

Description
Great thinkers have existed around the world and across time. Their ideas have been an integral part of social, economic, cultural, and political life. Their philosophical and literary contribution has not simply been the isolated speculation of a few remarkable individuals but has extended much further: they have shaped their communities historically and continue to form our contemporary global society and culture. This course takes a cross-cultural historical look at some of the most influential philosophical and literary traditions such as the ancient Greek, Chinese, Indian, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, and Mayan. In each tradition the course examines various original writings on the following questions: how should we organize our social, economic, cultural, and political life? What is the place of humans in the grand, cosmological scheme of things? And how should one live one’s life? Some of the writings we review include those of Plato, Aristotle, Herodotus, Confucius, Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Sun Tzu, the Brahmanical tradition, the Buddha, as well as the The Epic of Gilgamesh and The Popol Vuh.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS South S050

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course is a Summer Seminar. Learn more about Summer Seminars on this page. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 22 students

Syllabus

CREA S-100r
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Short Story

Leah De Forest MFA, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35175 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive workshop in the craft of writing short fiction. It is for writers who love to read short stories and want to make their own short stories come alive on the page. Students should arrive having read widely among past and contemporary practitioners of the short story form. We build on that foundation through close reading and discussion of exceptional short stories. We also consider practicalities, such as how to organize a collection in progress, how to submit stories to literary journals, and how to stay connected to your vision. Much of our time together is spent in workshop. Students carefully read and thoughtfully respond to one another’s writing and we work together to determine how best to filter and synthesize the feedback offered in a workshop setting. The skills honed via peer critique are crucial in editing one’s own work, and students conclude the term having written and revised two new short stories (10 to 20 pages each).

Prerequisites: A beginning- or intermediate-level fiction writing course or permission of the instructor. Students should bring a 10-page sample of their work to the first class.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-100r
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Short Story

Gabriel Houck PhD, Creative Writing Fellow in Fiction, Creative Writing Program, Emory University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35579 | Section 2

Description
This is an intensive workshop in the craft of writing short fiction. It is for writers who love to read short stories and want to make their own short stories come alive on the page. Students should arrive having read widely among past and contemporary practitioners of the short story form. We build on that foundation through close reading and discussion of exceptional short stories. We also consider practicalities, such as how to organize a collection in progress, how to submit stories to literary journals, and how to stay connected to your vision. Much of our time together is spent in workshop. Students carefully read and thoughtfully respond to one another’s writing and we work together to determine how best to filter and synthesize the feedback offered in a workshop setting. The skills honed via peer critique are crucial in editing one’s own work, and students conclude the term having written and revised two new short stories (10 to 20 pages each).

Prerequisites: A beginning- or intermediate-level fiction writing course or permission of the instructor. Students should bring a 10-page sample of their work to the first class.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-101r
Writing a Nonfiction Book

Deirdre Mask JD, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35578 | Section 1

Description
This is a course for people who are embarked on a book-length work of nonfiction: biographers, memoirists, historians, journalists, science writers, and others who are writing for a non-specialist audience. Students should have a clearly formulated book idea or, ideally, be already working on a project. In the course we talk about voice, structure, audience, and how to pitch projects to agents and publishers. We also read samples from a wide variety of nonfiction books.

Prerequisites: At least one creative writing course, preferably beginning or advanced narrative (or creative) nonfiction.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-105r
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Novel

Thomas Wisniewski PhD, Lecturer on Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35626 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive course on the craft of writing the novel for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of novelistic form and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). We look closely at modern exemplars, discuss key craft elements native to long-form fiction, and workshop new writing by students.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-105r
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Novel

William Michael Giraldi MFA, Master Lecturer, Boston University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35646 | Section 2

Description
This is an intensive course on the craft of writing the novel for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of novelistic form and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). We look closely at modern exemplars, discuss key craft elements native to long-form fiction, and workshop new writing by students.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-141
Advanced TV Writing: Comedy Sketch Writing

Hugh Fink BFA, Television Comedy Writer and Producer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35468 | Section 1

Description
In this course, students develop comedy sketch-writing skills by studying the work of masters of the genre and by drafting and revising the components of a professional submission packet: evergreen topical jokes, fake commercials, conceptual pieces, and original comedic characters. We analyze the comedic structure and use of escalation in classic sketch templates (television and film parodies, political satire, and digital shorts), as well as sketches written for iconic productions, including Saturday Night Live, Key and Peele, and The Chappelle Show. In workshop, students experience the professional pitching and rewriting process as they refine their comedic voice.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-143
Advanced Fiction: Writing the Murder Mystery Novel

David Freed ALM, Novelist and Journalist

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35635 | Section 1

Description
Murder mysteries have become among the most popular realms of commercial fiction, with an insatiable demand for new titles each year among the millions of the genre’s loyal devotees and abundant opportunities for aspiring authors. This course guides students in conceiving their own murder mystery, from plot outline to the execution of a commercially viable first chapter.

Prerequisites: At least one advanced writing course, or by prior permission from the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-144
Advanced Fiction: Queer Narratives

Nick White PhD, Visiting Associate Professor of English, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35595 | Section 1

Description
Is there a queer aesthetic? Or is there a particularly queer way to tell a story? Do our lived experiences as queer folk affect the kinds of stories we tell? In this course, we explore how queer writers have endeavored to tell their stories, and then we craft and workshop our own. Readings include excerpts or full texts from Alexander Chee’s Edinburgh, Garth Greenwell’s Cleanness, Jewelle G mez’s The Gilda Stories, Randall Kenan’s A Visitation of Spirits, Andrea Lawlor’s Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl, and Morgan Thomas’s Manywhere. Students write one flash piece and one short story or novel chapter (around 5,000 words). The final project is a substantial revision of the short story or novel chapter.

Prerequisites: A beginning fiction writing course or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-148
Advanced Fiction: Writing Flash Fiction

Thomas Wisniewski PhD, Lecturer on Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35361 | Section 1

Description
How to tell a story in a single paragraph? In a page? In three? This advanced writing course explores one of the hottest forms of fiction published today: flash fiction. Students read widely and experiment freely with the form, which offers a range of possibilities both in style and in length. In weekly writing workshops, students receive regular feedback on their work-in-progress and significantly revise 20-25 pages of prose with the aim of publication. As students draft their work, we study and dissect models of masterful very short fiction by writers both classic and contemporary, including Colette, Guy de Maupassant, Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Clarice Lispector, Ernest Hemingway, Yasunari Kawabata, Dorothy Parker, Jamaica Kincaid, Lydia Davis, Charles Baxter, Anne Carson, Keith Taylor, Joyce Carol Oates, and Amy Hempel. We discuss these texts with the eye of a writer attentive to elements of craft: dramatic structure, tone, point of view, suspense, prose style, rhythm, characterization, and plot. Working in this genre pushes students to write with economy and to polish their sentences as they aspire towards the hallmarks of excellent prose fiction: precision and economy, clarity and urgency. The course concludes with a conversation about how to break into publishing by working in a form that offers many opportunities for literary contests, awards, and first publications.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-149
Advanced Fiction: Writing with Animals

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta PhD, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35561 | Section 1

Description
Animals are “good to think with,” anthropologist Claude L vi-Strauss suggested. Stories about animals have always been close to the heart of every human culture. When we write about animals, we are writing about all of life, whether we are critiquing human society, processing (through stories of the deaths of good animals) our own mortality and attachments, or bringing our own cultural associations to a given animal. In this course, we explore how humans write about animals. Readings may include Samantha Schweblin on birds, Haruki Murakami on kangaroos, Julio Cort zar on axolotls, Brian Doyle on hummingbirds, Clarissa Pinkola Est s on selkies, Karen Russell on silkworms, and animal fables and mythologies from around the world. Drawing upon the great literary pool of animal stories, students write their own stories about animals, creatively depicting these other species and what they tells us about being human. Students produce a complete short story, a chapter of a new work, or a new chapter for a work in progress.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am, Barker Center 316
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am, Barker Center 316

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper due Monday, July 24.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-25
Beginning Fiction

Mary Sullivan Walsh BA, Author and Freelance Editor

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33954 | Section 1

Description
Students learn and practice the fundamentals of writing fiction character, plot, dialogue, description, style in a workshop setting. By discussing and analyzing published short fiction (our list may include such writers as James Baldwin, Junot Diaz, and Jhumpa Lahiri), students learn the narrative techniques and strategies of creative writers. This course is intended for those who write regularly and wish to develop their skills, talents, and voices.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Barker Center 114

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-30
Poetry Writing

Stephanie Burt PhD, Professor of English, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34505 | Section 1

Description
This course is about writing and, therefore, reading many kinds of poetry, including brand new open forms, very old rhymed and metered forms, digital native forms, parodies, and (as Yeats put it) “imitation of great masters.” It offers a chance to expand the potential for your own writing, taught mostly in workshop format, as well as a way to find models and allies.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Barker Center 218

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-45a
Beginning Screenwriting

Jan Schuette MA, Director and Producer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35563 | Section 1

Description
This is a workshop for those who wish to learn the foundations and processes for writing feature-length motion picture screenplays. Adaptations, documentary, and television scripts may be written with the instructor’s permission. Topics covered include concept and theme development, dramatic structure, plot, character arc, dialogue writing, the use of visual language, and writing in format. By the semester’s end, students produce a full feature film treatment and complete act one of their film in script format. Class meetings consist of presentation and discussion of work, writing exercises, brief lectures, film, and script analyses. At the semester’s end, actors do readings of script segments.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-45a
Beginning Screenwriting

Susan Steinberg PhD, Filmmaker, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35363 | Section 2

Description
This is a workshop for those who wish to learn the foundations and processes for writing feature-length motion picture screenplays. Adaptations, documentary, and television scripts may be written with the instructor’s permission. Topics covered include concept and theme development, dramatic structure, plot, character arc, dialogue writing, the use of visual language, and writing in format. By the semester’s end, students produce a full feature film treatment and complete act one of their film in script format. Class meetings consist of presentation and discussion of work, writing exercises, brief lectures, film, and script analyses. At the semester’s end, actors do readings of script segments.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Robinson Hall 107

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-490a
Writing Residency: Fiction

Daphne Kalotay PhD, Lecturer in Creative Writing, Princeton University

Jane A. Rosenzweig MFA, Director of the Writing Center and Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson PhD, Editor, Harvard Review, Harvard College Library

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35632 | Section 1

Description
This section of the creative writing residency is for fiction writers, but it can accommodate students working in the area of nonfiction writing. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 14. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency feature guest lectures on specific elements of the craft and the business of writing.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 26, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original work. The manuscript may be a short story or the opening of a novel. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
See course description
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, July 10-14, 10:00am-5:00pm, CGIS Knafel K107
Mondays, Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304
Week one: Monday-Friday, July 10-14, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16. Weeks two and three: Mondays and Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15-6:15 pm (all students are required to attend and participate, either by being present in the classroom or online via web conference. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus). See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 27.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus. Harvard Summer School housing is available for the full three weeks for students who wish to remain on campus while they work on their writing projects (one-week housing is not available on campus). Students in this section, other sections of CREA S-490A, and sections of CREA S-490B and CREA S-490C may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-490a
Writing Residency: Fiction

Rachel Kadish MA, MFA in Creative Writing Faculty, Lesley University

Jane A. Rosenzweig MFA, Director of the Writing Center and Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson PhD, Editor, Harvard Review, Harvard College Library

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35633 | Section 2

Description
This section of the creative writing residency is specifically for fiction writers. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 14. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency feature guest lectures on specific elements of the craft and the business of writing.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 26, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original work. The manuscript may be a short story or the opening of a novel. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
See course description
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, July 10-14, 10:00am-5:00pm, Robinson Hall 105
Mondays, Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304
Week one: Monday-Friday, July 10-14, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16. Weeks two and three: Mondays and Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15-6:15 pm (all students are required to attend and participate, either by being present in the classroom or online via web conference. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus). See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 27.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus. Harvard Summer School housing is available for the full three weeks for students who wish to remain on campus while they work on their writing projects (one-week housing is not available on campus). Students in this section, other sections of CREA S-490A, and sections of CREA S-490B and CREA S-490C may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-490a
Writing Residency: Fiction

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta PhD, Writer

Jane A. Rosenzweig MFA, Director of the Writing Center and Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson PhD, Editor, Harvard Review, Harvard College Library

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35634 | Section 3

Description
This section of the creative writing residency is for fiction writers. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 14. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency feature guest lectures on specific elements of the craft and the business of writing.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 26, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original fiction. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
See course description
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, July 10-14, 10:00am-5:00pm, Barker Center 316
Mondays, Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304
Week one: Monday-Friday, July 10-14, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16. Weeks two and three: Mondays and Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15-6:15 pm (all students are required to attend and participate, either by being present in the classroom or online via web conference. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus). See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 27.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus. Harvard Summer School housing is available for the full three weeks for students who wish to remain on campus while they work on their writing projects (one-week housing is not available on campus). Students in this section, other sections of CREA S-490A, and sections of CREA S-490B and CREA S-490C may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-490a
Writing Residency: Fiction

Lindsay Mitchell MFA, Senior Editor, Harvard Magazine

Jane A. Rosenzweig MFA, Director of the Writing Center and Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson PhD, Editor, Harvard Review, Harvard College Library

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35655 | Section 4

Description
This section of the creative writing residency is for fiction writers, but it can accommodate students working in the area of nonfiction writing. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading held on the first Friday, July 14. The master class is followed by an agents-and-editors weekend consisting of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency feature guest lectures on specific elements of the craft and the business of writing.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 26, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original work. The manuscript may be a short story or the opening of a novel. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
See course description
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, July 10-14, 10:00am-5:00pm, 1 Bow Street 317
Mondays, Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304
Week one: Monday-Friday, July 10-14, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16. Weeks two and three: Mondays and Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15-6:15 pm (all students are required to attend and participate, either by being present in the classroom or online via web conference. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus). See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 27.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus. Harvard Summer School housing is available for the full three weeks for students who wish to remain on campus while they work on their writing projects (one-week housing is not available on campus). Students in this section, other sections of CREA S-490A, and sections of CREA S-490B and CREA S-490C may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-490b
Writing Residency: Dramatic Writing

Bryan Delaney MA, Playwright and Screenwriter

Shelley Evans MFA, Screenwriter

Jane A. Rosenzweig MFA, Director of the Writing Center and Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson PhD, Editor, Harvard Review, Harvard College Library

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35631 | Section 1

Description
This section of the creative writing residency is specifically for writers interested in writing drama, as well as for fiction and creative nonfiction writers interested in studying elements of dramatic structure to gain a new perspective on their work. Students who are interested in exploring dramatic writing for the first time or who would like to expand their skill set are welcome to register. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the dramatic writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading or simulated television writers room held on the first Friday, July 14. The master class is followed by a film screening and/or panel discussion during an agents-and-editors weekend in which all residency students participate. The agents-and-editors weekend consists of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency feature guest lectures on specific elements of the craft and the business of writing.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 26, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 15 pages of a dramatic script (for a play, television pilot, or film). Alternately, they may submit approximately 3,500 words from a prose piece (a short story, novel, or work of nonfiction) that they would like to adapt into dramatic form. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
See course description
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, July 10-14, 10:00am-5:00pm, Barker Center 211
Mondays, Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304
Week one: Monday-Friday, July 10-14, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16. Weeks two and three: Mondays and Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15-6:15 pm (all students are required to attend and participate, either by being present in the classroom or online via web conference. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus). See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 27.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus. Harvard Summer School housing is available for the full three weeks for students who wish to remain on campus while they work on their writing projects (one-week housing is not available on campus). Students in this section and sections of CREA S-490A and CREA S-490C may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-490c
Writing Residency: Genre Fiction

Katie Beth Kohn MA

Jane A. Rosenzweig MFA, Director of the Writing Center and Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Christina Thompson PhD, Editor, Harvard Review, Harvard College Library

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35630 | Section 1

Description
This section of the creative writing residency is specifically for writers interested in writing genre fiction, as well as for fiction and creative nonfiction writers interested in studying elements of genre to gain a new perspective on their work. Examples of genres we consider include science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, comedy, and romance. Students who are interested in exploring genre fiction for the first time or who would like to expand their skill set are welcome to register. Students interested in developing script work (screenplays, teleplays, stage plays) are also welcome to register. The writing residency is for advanced creative writers who have been admitted to the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. In the first week, participants explore fundamentals of the dramatic writer’s craft in a workshop setting. Students also prepare for and participate in a student reading or simulated television writers room held on the first Friday, July 14. The master class is followed by a film screening and/or panel discussion during an agents-and-editors weekend in which all residency students participate. The agents-and-editors weekend consists of two days of panels, workshops, and individual consultations designed to teach students how to bring their creative work to the marketplace. Weeks two and three of the residency feature guest lectures on specific elements of the craft and the business of writing.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in good academic standing in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), creative writing and literature. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must have successfully completed at least 28 degree-applicable credits with required grades. By June 26, two weeks prior to the start of the master class, each candidate must post to the course website a manuscript of no more than 3,500 words of original work. The manuscript may be a short story or the opening of a novel. Dramatic writers may submit a scene from a script. All participants are required to read and critique their fellow students’ work in advance of the first meeting. Candidates who do not meet the degree requirements or fail to submit the manuscript and complete the critiques are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
See course description
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, July 10-14, 10:00am-5:00pm, CGIS South S040
Mondays, Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304
Week one: Monday-Friday, July 10-14, 10 am-noon and 2-5 pm; agents-and-editors weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16. Weeks two and three: Mondays and Wednesdays, July 17-27, 3:15-6:15 pm (all students are required to attend and participate, either by being present in the classroom or online via web conference. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus). See syllabus for further details. Final work is due July 27.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students attending on F-1 visas must attend all course meetings on campus. Harvard Summer School housing is available for the full three weeks for students who wish to remain on campus while they work on their writing projects (one-week housing is not available on campus). Students in this section and sections of CREA S-490A and CREA S-490B may interact with one another, for example, in Canvas or class sessions. Accordingly, when students participate in live class sessions, they will do so alongside students in other sections. If students participate in a way that causes them to appear in recordings of the class, those recordings may be shown to students enrolled in other sections of this course.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-65
Humor Writing

Ian Shank MFA, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35590 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive workshop for creative writing students looking to seriously invest in their craft. Over the course of the semester, students draft five mini-essays (1-2 pages each) inspired by an author or comic technique studied in class, and then expand and substantively revise one or two of these drafts to include in a final portfolio (10 pages). As part of the final revision process, students identify an online humor publication in consultation with the instructor that is aligned with the spirit of their work, and then pitch and/or submit at least one piece from their final portfolio for consideration.

Prerequisites: A beginning-level creative writing course or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Barker Center 211
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Barker Center 211

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper due Monday, July 24.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-72
Writing the Short Personal Essay

Tracy L. Strauss MFA, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35562 | Section 1

Description
The personal essay inspires both readers and writers to discover new perspectives for looking at the world, to understand their own lives, and to discover meaning. Personal essays educate and illuminate readers through stories of overcoming obstacles, facing challenges, and forging new paths. They can appear in a variety of styles from application essays to highly journalistic forms, to everything in between depending on their intended audience. In this course, students read and analyze a variety of short personal essays with the aim of collecting a palette of craft tools (particularly for works under 1,500 words), as well as write their own piece, engaging in writing exercises, including drafts, revisions, and peer workshop. Students write one shorter essay (600 words), one longer essay (1,500 words), and a revision of the longer essay into a 900-word piece (sometimes an editor will accept an essay on the contingency that the word count be drastically cut). We also address pitching editors and discovering markets for submission, along with how to manage audience response post-publication.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

CREA S-90
Fundamentals of Fiction

Christopher S. Mooney MA, Author

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35037 | Section 1

Description
This intensive, immersive course is designed for graduate-credit students with strong writing skills and an interest in becoming fiction writers but little formal experience, students who would like to develop a solid foundation in story and scene structure before embarking on an advanced fiction writing course. The first part of the course focuses on a close analysis of plot and structure in several short stories and novels. Students then apply these techniques and methods to generate and shape their own ideas, build a solid narrative foundation, and use scene structure to craft a dramatic story. Using Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, students explore and learn the fundamentals of character, dialogue, showing versus telling, and point of view. By the end of the course, students complete a short story or the first chapter of a novel (about 15 to 20 pages of fiction), which is workshopped in class.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

CSCI S-101
Foundations of Data Science and Engineering

Bruce Huang EdD, PhD, Director of Master’s Degree Program in Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35160 | Section 1

Description
Most data scientists spend 20 percent of their time building data models and analyzing model results. What do they do with the remaining 80 percent of their time? The answer is data engineering. Data engineering is a subdiscipline of software engineering that focuses on the transportation, transformation, and management of data. This course takes a comprehensive approach to explore data science, which includes data engineering concepts and techniques. Key topics include data management and transformation, exploratory data analysis and visualization, statistical thinking and machine learning, natural language processing, and storytelling with data, emphasizing the integration of Python, MySQL, Tableau, development, and big data analytics platforms. Students cannot earn Harvard Extension School degree credit for CSCI S-101 if it is taken after CSCI E-29.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-7, CSCI S-50, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

CSCI S-108
Data Mining, Discovery, and Exploration

Stephen Elston PhD, Principal Consultant, Quantia Analytics LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35576 | Section 1

Description
Extracting useful insights and relationships from massive complex data sets is the domain of data mining. The massive size and high complexity of data sets has transformed the practice of data mining in the twenty-first century. Data mining algorithms have advanced rapidly to address this growth in size and complexity. Data mining has wide ranging applications in science and technology, including web search, interactions in social networks, recommender systems, processing signals in large internet-of-things (IoT) sensor networks, image search, genetic analysis, and discovery of interactions between drugs. This course surveys a range of algorithms applied to data mining. The emphasis of the course is on unsupervised and semi-supervised learning using statistical and graph algorithms. Scaling and computational efficiency of data mining algorithms are explored. The course comprises readings and lectures on theory along with hands-on exercises and projects where students apply theory through Python coding. For the hands-on component of the course, students use a variety of libraries in the Python language, including possibly Scikit-Learn, NetworkX, Neo4J, and Surprise. Students enrolled for graduate credit are required to submit an independent project. This project must demonstrate a mastery of methods covered in the course as applied to a suitable real-world data set.

Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this course are expected to have some background in Python programming equivalent to CSCI S-7 or CSCI S-50 and statistical modeling equivalent to CSCI S-63c, CSCI S-101, CSCI E-106, or STAT E-109. Knowledge of basic linear algebra, equivalent to MATH S-21a, is essential.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Syllabus

CSCI S-111
Intensive Introduction to Computer Science and Data Structures

David G. Sullivan PhD, Master Lecturer on Computer Science, Boston University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32344 | Section 1

Description
This course is a fast-paced and rigorous introduction to computer science. The first half of the course covers foundational programming concepts such as data types, conditional execution, iteration, and recursion. It also explores the key features of object-oriented programming, as well as the manipulation of data stored in files and arrays. The second half of the course provides a survey of fundamental data structures including lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. It explores the implementation of these data structures using both array-based and linked representations, and it examines classic algorithms that use these structures for tasks such as sorting, searching, and text compression. Techniques for analyzing the efficiency of algorithms are also covered. Problem sets require a minimum of twenty hours of work each week, including both written problems and programming exercises using the Java programming language. Graduate-credit students are expected to complete additional work. The course includes coverage of the key topics needed for the AP Computer Science A examination, but it also includes a substantial amount of additional material on data structures and algorithm analysis that would ordinarily be covered in the second or third semester of a college-level CS curriculum. Students who have completed the Harvard Extension School courses CSCI E-10a, CSCI E-10b, CSCI E-22, or CSCI E-50 cannot earn degree credit for CSCI S-111.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with precalculus.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Maxwell-Dworkin G115
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

CSCI S-147a
Fundamentals of the Law and Cybersecurity

David Cass MBA, Vice President, Cyber and IT Risk, Supervision Group, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Daniel Garrie JD, Founder and Managing Director, Law and Forensics, LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35408 | Section 1

Description
In a world with almost limitless data collection capability, where cyberattacks can propagate instantaneously and where the identity or location of an adversary may not be known, individuals and institutions are increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks that disrupt productivity, jeopardize privacy, and threaten national security. This course examines legal, business, and policy challenges stemming from rapidly evolving cybersecurity threats. It begins with an introduction to cybersecurity, cybercrime, and cyberwarfare. It explores the national and international legal frameworks that govern cyberspace, including laws related to cyber crime, espionage, and war. The course also discusses how current laws affect corporations and provides detailed case studies regarding the state of cybersecurity in various countries. It looks at the limits of current law and the need for further policy evolution, as well as the real-world impact of different legal, business, and policy options.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-14a
Building Interactive Web Applications for Data Analysis

Zona Kostic PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34493 | Section 1

Description
This course covers techniques for creating custom exploratory data analysis tools. Students learn how to process data into a web application taking care of both front-end visual attractiveness and back-end functionality. Python-based frameworks and visualization libraries are used for building the fully functional project architectures. Upon completion, project setups are deployed to the cloud infrastructure, leveraging the dynamic nature of data-intensive applications.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with Python programming language, basic data science concepts, and experience with front-end development. Some experience with data visualization is useful, but not required.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Required sections Wednesdays, time to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 48 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-184
Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Ethics, Governance, and Laws

Bruce Huang EdD, PhD, Director of Master’s Degree Program in Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35565 | Section 1

Description
Data science and artificial intelligence (AI) are creating new opportunities to improve businesses’ decision making, productivity, and competitiveness. However, data science and AI also create ethical and privacy concerns. For example, a classification algorithm can harm a sub-category of the population due to bias in the data used to develop and train the model. Data scientists and AI engineers often learn the concepts, tools, and techniques and then start to collect data and develop machine learning algorithms without realizing the unintended consequences of their data products. What obligation do data scientists and AI engineers have to be guardians of the data they collect and analyze? How do we ensure data and AI products’ fairness, interpretability, privacy, and security? This course focuses on ethics, governance, and laws specifically related to data science and AI. This course aims to provide a framework to help students understand the value tradeoffs at stake as they collect data, develop algorithms, and deal with some of the consequences. We use case studies, examples, and simulations to facilitate learning, critical thinking, debates, decision making, and problem solving in the context of data science, AI ethics, and governance.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-101 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-1b
Computer Science for Business Professionals

David J. Malan PhD, Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34827 | Section 1

Description
This course is a variant of Harvard College’s introduction to computer science, CS50, designed especially for business professionals. Whereas CS50 itself takes a bottom-up approach, emphasizing mastery of low-level concepts and implementation details thereof, this course takes a top-down approach, emphasizing mastery of high-level concepts and design decisions related thereto. Ultimately, this course empowers students to make technological decisions even if not technologists themselves. Topics include cloud computing, networking, privacy, scalability, security, and more, with an emphasis on web and mobile technologies. Students emerge from this course with first-hand appreciation of how it all works and all the more confident in the factors that should guide their decision making. This course is designed for managers, product managers, founders, and decision makers more generally.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

CSCI S-20
Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

Rebecca Nesson PhD, Associate Senior Lecturer on Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34851 | Section 1

Description
This course teaches all the math not taught in the traditional calculus/linear algebra sequence that is needed to take more advanced courses in theory of computation and/or algorithms. That is, it teaches discrete mathematics, logic, and basic probability, but does not teach calculus or linear algebra. It also gives a good introduction to reading mathematical notation and writing formal proofs. A principal objective of the course is to not just teach a set of mathematical topics, but also to prepare students to think mathematically and to read and write mathematics. It is a fast-moving course that demands a substantial commitment of time and effort for students to be successful.

Prerequisites: MATH S-Ar or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. The pre-recorded lectures are the same as those used in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences course Computer Science 20.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-23a
Introduction to Game Development

Colton T. Ogden Chief Technology Officer, From Zero LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35364 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on the development of 2D games. Students explore the design of such childhood titles as Super Mario Bros., Legend of Zelda, and Pok mon in a quest to understand how video games themselves are implemented. Via lectures and hands-on projects, the course explores principles of 2D graphics, animation, sound, and collision detection using Lua, a dynamic scripting language, and L VE, a lightweight 2D game development framework. By course’s end, students have programmed several of their own games and gained a thorough understanding of the basics of game design and development.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-7, CSCI E-10a, CSCI E-50, CS50x, or prior programming experience in any language.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

CSCI S-3
Introduction to Web Programming Using JavaScript

Laurence P. Bouthillier MS, Executive Director, University of British Columbia Extended Learning

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35564 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an introduction to web development by way of the essential language and runtime environment that powers modern web interfaces. Through a series of examples and projects, students learn basic programming concepts while building an understanding of the power and complexities of JavaScript, which can perplex even experienced web developers. The course provides a solid foundation in computer programming in JavaScript: syntax and data structures, conditionals, objects, scope and closures, Ajax, the DOM, and event handling. Other topics include form handling and validation, writing and extending web video players, and animations and drawing on the canvas. Students gain an understanding of the popular libraries and frameworks that power rich web applications such as jQuery, VueJS, and others. Upon completion, students are prepared to use JavaScript and JS libraries in their projects, write their own or extend existing JavaScript libraries, and build rich web applications using these powerful tools.

Prerequisites: Prior experience with basic HTML and CSS is important. Students with no prior exposure to programming may find the summer session very challenging and should plan on a significant time commitment, or may want to consider taking the course during a full semester offering at the Harvard Extension School.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Syllabus

CSCI S-33a
Web Programming with Python and JavaScript

Brian Paul Yu EdM, Preceptor in Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34139 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the design and implementation of web applications with Python, JavaScript, and SQL using frameworks like Django, React, and Bootstrap. Topics include database design, scalability, security, and user experience. Through hands-on projects, students learn to write and use APIs, create interactive user interfaces (UIs), and leverage cloud services like GitHub and Heroku. By semester’s end, students emerge with knowledge and experience in the principles, languages, and tools that empower them to design and deploy applications on the internet.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-50, CS50x, or at least one year of experience with Python.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

CSCI S-38
Introduction to C++ for Programmers

Lisa DiOrio MS, Owner and Lead Developer, Fembot Creative

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33956 | Section 1

Description
An understanding of C++ helps to solidify knowledge of programming concepts and provides a strong foundation for learning other programming languages. This course takes students’ programming skills to the next level by emphasizing practical programming skills while focusing on creating text-based games. The course examines common programming constructs as they are implemented in C++ including C++ 11. Topics include the use of C++ for memory management, file input/output (I/O), pointers, references, exceptions, and object-oriented programming. Basic data structures such as linked lists, stacks, and queues are covered in terms of their usage and implementation using C++. Modules in the course are accompanied by a mini-game project to teach the associated programming concepts as well as to hone problem-solving skills and good coding practices.

Prerequisites: A practical understanding of a structured programming language such as C, Java, JavaScript, or Python, or permission of the instructor. Students are expected to understand basic programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, and procedures.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Syllabus

CSCI S-40
Communication Protocols and Internet Architectures

Len Evenchik SM, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33106 | Section 1

Description
This course provides a structured technical approach to the design, analysis, and implementation of internet protocols and network architectures. We study various systems and protocols, including: TCP/IP, encryption and security protocols, e-mail/SMTP, DNS and DoH, routing protocols (RIP, OSPF, and BGP), and the LAN protocol suite. The course also discusses new and important areas of work, including multimedia protocols for voice and video, gigabit wireless networks, the internet of things (IoT), software-defined networks (SDN), and network functions virtualization (NFV).

Prerequisites: Some programming and internet experience.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course CSCI E-40.

Syllabus

CSCI S-49a
Cryptography and Identity Management for Cloud and Internet of Things (IoT) Applications

Ramesh Nagappan MS, Principal Security Technologist, Amazon

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34482 | Section 1

Description
Confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, authorization, and accountability are the most critical security requirements that serve as the basis for deploying and delivering trustworthy information technology applications and services in enterprises, mobile devices, and via cloud providers. Adopting cryptography and identity management techniques addresses these security requirements and has become a vital part of all business applications and electronic transactions. This course provides ground-up coverage on the high-level concepts, applied mechanisms, architecture, and real-world implementation practices of cryptography and identity management techniques as they apply to blockchain and cloud-hosted applications and services.

Prerequisites: CSCI E-49, CSCI E-90, CSCI E-118, or equivalent. Experience with web application development and/or systems administration using a cloud provider is helpful. Applications programming skills not required.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Friday, June 23, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-50
Intensive Introduction to Computer Science

David J. Malan PhD, Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34745 | Section 1

Description
This course is an intensive introduction to the intellectual enterprises of computer science and the art of programming. It is a fast-moving course that demands a substantial commitment of time and effort for students to be successful. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, security, software engineering, and web development. Languages include C, Python, SQL, and JavaScript plus CSS and HTML. Problem sets are inspired by real-world domains of biology, cryptography, finance, forensics, and gaming. Students can count two of the following three courses CSCI E-10a, CSCI E-10b, and CSCI E-50 toward a degree. They cannot count all three toward an Extension School degree.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences course Computer Science 50 (CS50).

CSCI S-57
Java Enterprise Development with the Spring Framework

Vitaly Yurik PhD, Instructor, Rabb School of Continuing Studies, Brandeis University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35353 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an in-depth, hands-on study of technological, design, and development approaches for enterprise-level software systems using the Java-based Spring 5 framework. The Spring 5 framework enables creation of web and enterprise Java applications with the focus on high performance, scalability, testability, and reusability. The course examines core spring framework and its integration with other leading Java technologies, such as Hibernate, Java Persistence application programming interface (API) (JPA 2), Java messaging service (JMS), representational state transfer (REST) web services, security, and testing. Concepts covered in the course include inversion of control/dependency injection, Spring aspect-oriented programming (AOP); data access with Java database connectivity (JDBC), Hibernate, and Java Persistence API; Spring transaction management; Spring model-view-controller framework; Spring security; Spring REST web services; Spring JMS; and Spring testing. Hands-on development projects provide opportunities to apply Spring framework technological capabilities to the creation of enterprise-level Java applications.

Prerequisites: At least one year of professional Java development.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

CSCI S-597
Data Science Precapstone

Bruce Huang EdD, PhD, Director of Master’s Degree Program in Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Stephen Elston PhD, Principal Consultant, Quantia Analytics LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34439 | Section 1

Description
This course helps students develop an academically strong capstone proposal. It is mandatory for candidates in the Harvard Extension School Master of Liberal Arts, data science, who wish to register for CSCI E-599a in the upcoming fall term. It prepares students to explore interdisciplinary research topics from a variety of industries and areas. Through workshops and collaborating with experts from different disciplines, students identify research topics, apply the appropriate data science methods, and use data to advance innovative solutions. Students receive guidance and advising to work effectively in teams, refine project proposals, and build the domain knowledge necessary in their selected area. By the end of the course, each team submits a detailed research proposal, including project rationale, methods, and expected outcomes, which they intend to execute during CSCI E-599a. Students in this course join the students in CSCI S-597b as one cohort and may work together on precapstone projects.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted candidates in Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), data science and in their penultimate semester. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and in the process of successfully completing all degree requirements except the Harvard Extension School capstone, CSCI E-599a, which they must enroll in for the upcoming fall term as their final, one-and-only course. Registration in the Harvard Extension School course, CSCI E-599a, immediately following the Harvard Summer School course CSCI S-597 is a mandatory degree requirement. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 201
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 48 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-597b
Cybersecurity Precapstone

Bruce Huang EdD, PhD, Director of Master’s Degree Program in Information Technology, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35645 | Section 1

Description
This intensive summer session course helps students develop an academically strong capstone proposal. It is mandatory for candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, cybersecurity, who wish to register for CSCI E-599b in the upcoming fall term. It prepares students to explore interdisciplinary research topics from a variety of industries and areas. Through workshops and collaborating with experts from different disciplines, students identify research topics, apply the appropriate cybersecurity methods, and use data to advance innovative solutions. Students receive guidance and advising to work effectively in teams, refine project proposals, and build the domain knowledge necessary in their selected area. By the end of the course, each team submits a detailed research proposal, including project rationale, methods, and expected outcomes, which they intend to execute during CSCI E-599b. Students in this course join the students in CSCI S-597 as one cohort and may work together on precapstone projects.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted candidates in Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), cybersecurity, and in their penultimate semester. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and in the process of successfully completing all degree requirements except the Harvard Extension School capstone, CSCI E-599b, which they must enroll in for the upcoming fall term as their final, one-and-only course. Registration in the Harvard Extension School course, CSCI E-599b, immediately following the Harvard Summer School course CSCI S-597b is a mandatory degree requirement. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 201
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 18 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-63c
Elements of Data Science and Statistical Learning with R

Andrey Sivachenko PhD, Scientist IV, Head of Bioinformatics, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Lab

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34799 | Section 1

Description
One of the broad goals of data science is examining raw data with the purpose of identifying their structure and trends, and deriving conclusions and hypotheses from the latter. In the modern world awash with data, data analytics is more important than ever to fields ranging from biomedical research, space and weather science, finance, business operations, and production, through marketing and social media applications. This course provides an intensive introduction into various statistical learning methods; the R programming language, a very popular and powerful platform for scientific and statistical analysis and visualization, is also introduced and used throughout the course. We discuss the fundamentals of statistical testing and learning, and cover topics of linear and non-linear regression, regularization, unsupervised methods (principle component analysis [PCA] and clustering), and supervised classification, including support vector machines, random forests, and neural nets, using datasets drawn from diverse domains. This course is geared less toward theory (although some is presented, mostly qualitatively), and more toward developing intuition and the right way of thinking about statistical problems, as well as building practical skills through multiple, incremental assignments and extensive experimentation.

Prerequisites: Good programming skills, preferably in R or solid experience in other languages; good understanding of probability and statistics at the level of CSCI E-106 or STAT E-109. See the syllabus for the recommended pretest.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

CSCI S-7
Introduction to Computer Science with Python

Henry H. Leitner PhD, Senior Lecturer on Computer Science, Harvard University

Dimitri Kountourogianni MA, Software Engineer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34533 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to computer science for students without prior programming experience. We explore problem-solving methods and algorithm development using the high-level programming language Python after a brief introduction to computational concepts using Scratch. Python is a language with a simple syntax, and a powerful set of libraries. While Python is easy for beginners to learn, it is widely used in many scientific areas for data exploration. We cover basic data types and collections (lists, dictionaries, tuples, and sets), control flow, recursion, information hiding and encapsulation using classes and objects, and introduce the analysis of program performance. The examples and problems used in this course are drawn from diverse areas such as text processing and simple graphics creation. We also examine theoretical and practical limitations related to unsolvable and intractable computational problems.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Maxwell-Dworkin G115
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: On-campus meetings are recorded. A live stream is available at the time the class meets. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. See minimum technology requirements. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

CSCI S-71
Agile Software Development

Richard Kasperowski ALB, Chief Technology Officer, Thrivelution

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33524 | Section 1

Description
This course is an immersive experience in agile software development. We study the technical, cultural, and social aspects of agile, including agility in software product development; business agility, including scrum, agile product inception, user stories, product backlog construction, definition of done and definition of ready, estimating, agile forecasting, project management, sprint planning, and retrospectives; technical agility, including pair programming, mob programming, test-driven development, working with legacy code, refactoring for clean code, behavior-driven development, continuous integration, continuous delivery, DevOps; and advanced agility, including high-performance teams, core protocols for psychological safety and emotional intelligence, agile at large scale, and introducing and sustaining agile in your organization.

Prerequisites: CSCI E-22 or equivalent. Students should have a computer suitable for software development.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 53 Church Street 203
Friday, June 23, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 53 Church Street 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

CSCI S-80
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence with Python

Brian Paul Yu EdM, Preceptor in Computer Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34744 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the concepts and algorithms at the foundation of modern artificial intelligence, diving into the ideas that give rise to technologies like game-playing engines, handwriting recognition, and machine translation. Through hands-on projects, students gain exposure to the theory behind graph search algorithms, classification, optimization, reinforcement learning, and other topics in artificial intelligence and machine learning as they incorporate them into their own Python programs. By course’s end, students emerge with experience in libraries for machine learning as well as knowledge of artificial intelligence principles that enable them to design intelligent systems of their own.

Prerequisites: CSCI S-50, CS50x, or at least one year of experience with Python.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

CSCI S-89
Introduction to Deep Learning

Dmitry V. Kurochkin PhD, Senior Research Analyst, Faculty of Arts and Sciences Office for Faculty Affairs, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34723 | Section 1

Description
In this course students are introduced to the architecture of deep neural networks, algorithms that are developed to extract high-level feature representations of data. In addition to theoretical foundations of neural networks, including backpropagation and stochastic gradient descent, students get hands-on experience building deep neural network models with Python. Topics covered in the course include image classification, time series forecasting, text vectorization (tf-idf and word2vec), natural language translation, speech recognition, and deep reinforcement learning. Students learn how to use application program interfaces (APIs), such as TensorFlow and Keras, for building a variety of deep neural networks: convolutional neural network (CNN), recurrent neural network (RNN), self-organizing maps (SOM), generative adversarial network (GANs), and long short-term memory (LSTM). Some of the models will require the use of graphics processing unit (GPU) enabled Amazon Machine Images (AMI) in Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python programming equivalent to CSCI S-7. Basic knowledge of calculus, probability, and statistics is expected. Familiarity with linear algebra is helpful but not required. Students are expected to have access to a computer with a 64-bit operating system and at least 8 GB of RAM. GPU is highly recommended. No familiarity with Amazon Web Services (AWS) is assumed.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

Veronika Tuckerova PhD, Preceptor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

DEVP S-599
Global Development Practice Capstone

Judith Irene Rodriguez MA, Senior Research Associate, Zofnass Program for Sustainable Infrastructure, Harvard Graduate School of Design and Research Specialist, Healthy Cities Lab, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35007 | Section 1

Description
This course is a capstone designed for students earning a Master of Liberal Arts, global development practice. The course approach is learner-centered, whereby students create a development plan for a client by applying skills and knowledge gained from their graduate school experience. This course builds upon the student’s guided prework completed in DEVP E-598. The course deliverables include a detailed actionable and measurable plan, as well as a presentation to be given to the class and to client stakeholders. Appropriate clients may include communities, corporations, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), governmental agencies, schools, universities, and hospitals. Students work with a client with one or more stakeholders to develop and deliver a customized development plan focused on one or more of these areas: community development, human rights, labor practices, education, environmental sustainability, and fair operating practices. Listings of prior projects may be viewed at the global development practice capstone website.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), global development practice. Candidates must be in good academic standing, have successfully completed the precapstone tutorial, DEVP E-598, in the prior Harvard Extension School spring term, and be ready to graduate in November with only the capstone degree requirement remaining (no other course registration is allowed simultaneously with the capstone). Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 201
Friday, June 23, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 201
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper/project due Friday, August 18.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

DGMD S-1
Digital Media: From Ideas to Designs and Prototypes

Bakhtiar Mikhak PhD, Co-Founder, Media Modifications, Ltd.

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34801 | Section 1

Description
This is a practical design course on perspectives, tools, and methods for going from an idea for a product or service powered by a mobile and/or web application to an interactive design prototype ready for handoff to a development team. We begin with creating detailed personas and stories that capture why and for whom the product or service is developed. We then translate those personas and stories into storyboards that illustrate the application’s experiential flow in real-world contexts in terms of concrete visual and interaction design elements. We develop a component-based design system for creating interactive prototypes with live data. Our focus is on designing novel user experiences and leveraging third-party user interface kits to give our prototypes a professional look and feel. We create prototypes with a visual design tool that also allows creating and enhancing components with code for imagining and realizing even richer interactions and experience flows. Technologies used in this course include Framer, Notion, Milanote, React, and Visual Studio Code.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Harvard Hall 202
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Syllabus

DGMD S-14
Wearable Devices and Computer Vision

Nabib Ahmed AM, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Research, ML Ventures

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34484 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the field of wearable devices and computer vision, and exposes students to hands-on practical exercises based on real-life situations and industry problems. Wearable technologies is currently a $50 billion industry, with estimated annual growth of 10% year over year. It is experiencing explosive growth with exciting applications in many fields, from medicine to sports to fitness to entertainment, empowering people to interact, communicate, and experience the environment around them in new, innovative ways. Some prominent examples are smart watches, medical trackers, and augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) headsets. Underlying these advances in wearable devices is computer vision, which is an exciting field of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning enabling computers to derive information from images, videos, and other inputs. In this course we explore advances in wearable devices and utilize computer vision to tackle emerging problems (for example, assistive devices, educational applications, and health monitoring). Students learn about sensors, signal processing, data analytics, AI, machine learning, computational optical analysis, simultaneous localization and mapping, lighting and material estimation, and robust algorithms for modeling.

Prerequisites: Experience with programming, technical/code documentation, and data (any programming language will do; some examples are Python, R, Java, or C/C++). Either CSCI S-7 or CSCI S-50 will suffice. Familiarity with algebra and geometry. No background needed in machine learning, computer vision, or wearable devices.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Syllabus

DGMD S-17
Robotics, Autonomous Vehicles, Drones, and Artificial Intelligence

Nabib Ahmed AM, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Research, ML Ventures

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34560 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the field of robotics, autonomous vehicles, and drones, and expose students to their core technologies and systems through practical exercises and simulation. These are all exciting fields with tremendous growth and opportunities in the next 10-50 years billions of dollars are being invested and the market size is expected to grow 10-15% annually. The impact of these technologies can fundamentally revolutionize a multitude of industries and transform our society, from self-driving cars to same-day drone delivery to robotic assistants and laborers. This course explores the theories, tools, and processes that enable these technologies and exposes students to the challenges, limitations, and capabilities of modern robotics, autonomous vehicles, and drone technologies. Students learn about sensor technologies for automation, autonomy from a systems perspective, vision-based perception and techniques, modern machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithms, mathematical modeling and abstraction, and engineering design. The goal is to develop a fundamental toolkit to advance the next generation within the field.

Prerequisites: Experience with programming, technical/code documentation, and data (any language will do; some examples are Python, R, Java, C/C++). Either CSCI S-7 or CSCI S-50 will suffice. Familiarity with algebra and geometry. No background needed in machine learning, robotics, autonomous vehicles, or drones needed.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

DGMD S-30
Introduction to Media Production

Nicholas J. Manley MFA, Co-Founder, The Ebiz Institute

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33105 | Section 1

Description
This course is a complete movie-making academy in seven weeks. Working in small groups and guided by the instructor, students learn the basics of single-camera video production, field audio recording, and lighting for documentary and narrative film. Students learn how to light an interview like a pro, make the most of their equipment in the field, and break down any script into manageable pieces ready for shooting. Applying these techniques, students produce a short documentary or narrative film project on their own, and edit and deliver that movie using Adobe Premiere. We screen and critique students’ work as it evolves and refine methods for strengthening stories by looking at successful movies that have cracked the code. This course is designed for anyone who wants a crash course in producing quality video on a shoestring budget, and for storytellers who want to translate their ideas into compelling videos of any kind.

Prerequisites: Students can use DSLRs, video cameras, smartphones, or tablets to shoot and record media content. A tripod or camera stabilizer will also be needed. An audio recorder is beneficial but not required. The instructor will share different gear options prior to the course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

DGMD S-35
Video Editing and Digital Design

Allyson Sherlock MFA, Senior Affiliated Faculty in Visual and Media Arts, Emerson College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33286 | Section 1

Description
This course serves as an introduction to the art of video post-production. We explore the theory and practice of various editing styles in order to gain a better understanding of how stories are constructed in the editing room. Through demonstrations and hands-on experience, students learn advanced editing techniques with an in-depth examination of Adobe Premiere. To further enhance projects, students create animated motion graphics using After Effects and learn how to correct sound problems with Adobe Audition. Footage is provided for all exercises and projects. However, students are given the option to shoot new material for their final projects if desired.

Prerequisites: Experience with Macintosh computers.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 32 students

Syllabus

DGMD S-42
Making the Short Film: Innovations and Practices for the Digital Age

Allyson Sherlock MFA, Senior Affiliated Faculty in Visual and Media Arts, Emerson College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35031 | Section 1

Description
Short films are an exciting and ever-evolving form of storytelling in the digital age. This course explores the strong tradition short films have in our culture, as well as the new and innovative techniques filmmakers are currently using to tell and distribute their stories. In this course, students devote the entire term to the creation and completion of one short film, narrative or documentary, with the intent of festival submission and/or online release. Students work in a collaborative atmosphere with classmates and the instructor to refine scripts and treatments, plan productions, and create the final film. Students may work individually or partner in a collaborative team. Either way, the class serves as a support system for each student, offering advice, critiques, and resources so that each member of the class is an integral part of a fully realized short. In addition to supporting traditional filmmaking approaches, innovative storytelling techniques are strongly welcomed and supported. These can include interactive online documentaries, hybrid approaches (blending fiction and nonfiction), webisode pilots, and experimental techniques. Additionally, the course demystifies the online distribution process and the film festival circuit, exploring the many avenues filmmakers can take to get their work shown to a wider audience.

Prerequisites: Comfort with a video editing program and with using a video camera.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

DGMD S-44
Introduction to 2D Animation

Jason Wiser MFA, Creative Director, Yaya Play Games

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35028 | Section 1

Description
2D animation is the art of drawing to create the illusion of life, and is an extraordinary medium for storytelling and expression. In this course, students become familiar with animation principles for object and character motion, and use digital art and animation software to explore unique storytelling possibilities and create a portfolio of animation. Upon successful completion of this course, students gain an understanding of how to manipulate images and draw and color frames for animation, to show weight and expression in character and object motion, and to add animated visual effects to live footage.

Prerequisites: Every class students need to have access to a computer and a drawing tablet (small Wacom Intuos recommended) with art and animation software installed (Photoshop, Animate, and After Effects), all of which will be taught in this course.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

DGMD S-71
Character Design for Animation and Games

Jason Wiser MFA, Creative Director, Yaya Play Games

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34727 | Section 1

Description
The design of a character connects us to the story. So much of the meaning and expressive capability of a character depend on choices of proportion, color, silhouette, and rendering style. This course explores principles of character design and development pipelines for creating expressive animation-ready characters in multiple styles. Students gain an understanding of how to design characters for animation and develop tools for solving visual problems, create a portfolio of character art in diverse styles, and take their strongest designs from 2D to 3D digital models.

Prerequisites: Every class students need to have access to a computer and a drawing tablet (small Wacom Intuos recommended) with 2D painting software (Photoshop) and 3D software (Autodesk Maya and Mudbox) installed, both of which are taught in this course.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

DGMD S-9
Introduction to Digital Photography

Leonie Marinovich BA, Documentary Photographer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34478 | Section 1

Description
This course is aimed at students wishing to master the fundamentals of photography. It gives students the opportunity to learn photography using their digital camera (DSLR or mirrorless) and acquire the skills to use manual settings and use the different shooting modes available on their cameras. Topics covered in this class include the fundamentals of exposure, composition, lighting, editing techniques, color correction, delivery for print and digital media, metadata creation, and digital workflow management. We study classical art that has heavily influenced photography in the way that images are composed and lighted. The course is helpful to students who wish to explore digital photography as a way to document their field work and other work in progress and enhance their visual literacy, enabling them to assess images and other visual media. Students are taught Lightroom to manage their digital archives and learn to use editing techniques to enhance their images. Coursework is structured along two main components: technical mastery and aesthetic development. Students are first taught the technical skills which they then apply in practical exercises to consolidate those skills. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to have mastered their camera and their images should look more polished.

Prerequisites: Students do not need prior experience as photographers, but an interest in visual aesthetics is strongly recommended. Students need to have a digital camera (DSLR or mirrorless) with the ability to manually control aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. A “point-and-shoot” camera will not be sufficient in fulfilling all the criteria required in the assignments. A tripod is required. Students need a computer with Lightroom Classic CC installed. Photoshop is not required. Along with a computer, students need an external hard drive and memory cards for their camera.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Northwest Science Building B105

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-10
Introduction to Acting

John Kuntz MA, Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University and Associate Professor of Theater, Boston Conservatory at Berklee

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30038 | Section 1

Description
This course concentrates on the development of imagination, observation, focus of attention, and the effective use of materials drawn from life. Students work on acting scenes, which include an approach to textual analysis, as well as practice in communication, personal involvements, and the accomplishment of stage tasks. Class work includes extensive individual coaching and ensemble work.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Farkas Hall STUDIO

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Remo Airaldi AB, Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32727 | Section 1

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Farkas Hall 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Remo Airaldi AB, Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32763 | Section 2

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Remo Airaldi AB, Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33708 | Section 3

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Farkas Hall 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-140
Public Speaking

Terry Gipson MFA, Preceptor in Public Speaking, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35660 | Section 4

Description
This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic, and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience’s interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Farkas Hall 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-145
Voice and Speech: Breath, Presence, and Connection

Ashleigh Reade MFA, Assistant Professor, Voice and Speech, Boston University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35378 | Section 1

Description
This is a practical and experiential course designed for students who wish to explore voice, speech, and communication for theater, film, television, or public speaking. The course is designed around three unique performance projects, each project being an opportunity to explore different elements of the voice in service of storytelling. Using techniques from Catherine Fitzmaurice, Knight-Thompson Speechwork, and Action-Based Acting (to name a few), we explore breath, vocal support, resonance, speech, and text, underpinned by practical anatomy and focused on performance. Students can expect to have a deeper awareness of their physical and vocal habits, learn how to healthfully and sustainably use their voice, learn tools to create variety and dynamics when speaking, and explore the integration of voice, speech, and acting. Prior performance, acting, or singing experience is not necessary.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Farkas Hall 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-149
Latinx Movement: Latin Music, Dance, and Communal Practice

Laura B. Rodriguez MFA, Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35106 | Section 1

Description
Vamos a bailar! A warm invitation to connect with our body, deepen our artistry, and move together. This course rigorously explores the social and communal Latin diaspora of movement, migration, and music from Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, and the United States. The course utilizes a combination of English, Spanish, and Spanglish. Together we investigate and deepen our use of horizontal and vertical weight, isolations, polycentric movements, and hip whining techniques. We explore different approaches to learning complex choreography, understanding diverse movement pathways, and anatomy for dancers. Together we weave a survey of the history, art, and literature from the Latinx experience to broaden our understanding of Latinx identity politics. This course aims to facilitate Latinx movement with radical tenderness to embrace deeper states of power, awareness, and energetic alignment during movement rituals for heightened connectivity and restorative power. Key questions include: what does Latinx mean, and where did the identity term come from? Where do Latin dance styles come from? How does Latin dance inform contemporary dance today? Is there a movement conversation between Latin dance and African dance? How does Latin music’s role inspire Latin dance forms, preserve African rhythms, and influence popular music today?

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Farkas Hall STUDIO

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-21
Improvisational Acting

John Kuntz MA, Lecturer on Theater, Dance, and Media, Harvard University and Associate Professor of Theater, Boston Conservatory at Berklee

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32212 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed not only for students of the theater, but also for those with an interest in politics and debate, public speaking, trial law, and education, as well as a broad range of other careers. Students explore various improvisational techniques that fuse intellect, humor, imagination, voice, and body.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Farkas Hall STUDIO

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-22
Directing

Marcus Stern MFA, Head of Directing and Lecturer on Theater, Dance and Media, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30043 | Section 1

Description
This course is for directors interested in directing theater, television, and film. The course accommodates all levels of directing, from beginners with no experience to advanced directors who are interested in making a career of directing. The focus is on how a director can tell a story they care about in a way that each moment of that story is clear, engaging, and has a visceral impact. Through the constant creation of shorter and longer stories, students learn how to work with actors, how to create characters that an audience wants to follow, how to stage stories so they are clear and have an impact, and how to use light and sound to increase the power of their storytelling. Students are introduced to a variety of stage and film and/or video storytellers to see what kind of directorial storytelling styles might be of interest to them. Students direct both video and live scenes. No previous video experience is needed.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Farkas Hall STUDIO

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

DRAM S-24
Performing Musical Theater

Pamela J. Murray MusM, Performance Faculty, Voice, Musical Theater Cabaret Ensemble, Boston College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31956 | Section 1

Description
In this course, which is open to all levels, students explore how to create a polished and convincing solo song performance. Each class meeting begins with a vocal warmup, reviewing the basics of good singing technique and ear training. Through individual work, we approach each song from a vocal, musical, and dramatic standpoint, discussing character, story, and presentation. Students delve deeply into the song texts by working them as monologues, learn vocal techniques that strengthen their song performance, and study the musical score and how it enhances the lyrics. Partner exercises are used to explore lyrics and the meaning behind them, and students sometimes act in each other’s scenes to flesh out the songs and give them context. The final consists of a polished presentation of each student’s song, using all the elements explored throughout the term, and a brief report of the song, show, composer, and lyricist.

Prerequisites: Willingness to sing in front of the class.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Music Building PH9
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

James Robson PhD, James C. Kralik and Yunli Lou Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and Harvard College Professor, Harvard University

ECON S-1010
Microeconomic Theory

Robert Neugeboren PhD, Lecturer on Economics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34831 | Section 1

Description
This course presents the basic analytical tools of microeconomics. We start by looking at the decision making of individual consumers and ask how these decisions can be optimized, or improved. Next, we look at how firms make and coordinate their decisions under varying market structures, including perfect competition and monopoly. Then we look at strategic behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, making use of concepts from game theory such as Nash equilibrium. Finally, we take up topics including bargaining theory, information economics, externalities, public goods, and welfare analysis. Students learn the key tools and principles economists apply to understand a wide range of phenomena, using graphical representations, some math, and plain logic to present the important ideas and solve basic microeconomic problems.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a or equivalent and MATH S-1a or equivalent; students must also pass the proficiency examination.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1012
Macroeconomic Theory

Thomas H. Baranga PhD, Lecturer and Concentration Advisor in Economics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35547 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an overview of macroeconomic theory and the role and effects of governmental macroeconomic policy. We apply these ideas to understand some of the current debates about the US macroeconomy, such as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the causes of and possible policy responses to inflation. We discuss different and competing theories, try to understand what is at stake in the debate between rival schools of thought, and examine data to evaluate their relative merits. The first half of the course studies the long-run behavior of the macroeconomy (such as gross domestic product [GDP] and its growth, inflation, the role of labor and capital markets, and the open economy). The second half of the course studies business cycle fluctuations in general and the policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and high inflation in particular.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a, ECON S-10b, and MATH S-1a, or equivalent courses; students must also pass the proficiency examination.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Required sections Fridays, time to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1016
Labor Economics

Gregory Bruich PhD, Lecturer in Economics, Harvard University and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33880 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to the field of labor economics, with an emphasis on current policy issues and new research. Issues discussed include the effects of minimum wages, mandated benefits, immigration, taxes, and transfer programs on wages and employment; human capital and the labor market returns to education; measurement of the value added of teachers and colleges; the effect of unemployment insurance on unemployment durations; the effect of disability insurance on labor force participation; new evidence on income, wage, and wealth inequality and intergenerational mobility. Students learn current econometric and theoretical methods used in applied microeconomics and how to write about and apply these methods in their own research.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ECON S-1040
Game Theory and Strategic Decisions

Patrick Scholten PhD, Professor of Economics, Bentley University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35033 | Section 1

Description
Game theory is a set of tools designed to study multiple strategic agents in many different environments. The scenarios involve interactions where the payoff of one agent, Agent A, depends on both Agent A’s actions and the actions taken by other agents in the game. The objective in this course is to introduce students to the basic game theory concepts and apply these tools to more fully understand economic interactions. This course explores game theoretic topics such as pure- and mixed-strategy Nash equilibria of strategic-form games with perfect information, Nash and subgame-perfect equilibria for extensive-form games with perfect information, perfect Bayesian equilibria for games with imperfect information, Nash equilibrium of extensive-form games with imperfect information, equilibria concepts of finitely and infinitely repeated games, and bargaining games.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab, MATH S-1A, and MATH E-8, or the equivalent. Placement test recommended.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS South S020

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-10a
Principles of Economics: Microeconomics

Joshua Abel PhD, Manager, Analysis Group Inc.

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30056 | Section 1

Description
The course offers an introduction to the market system, emphasizing economic interactions among individuals, firms, and the government. Topics include economic decision making, supply-and-demand, perfect and imperfect competition, economic efficiency, and market failures. Policies such as those around the environment, healthcare, and income distribution are discussed. This course is equivalent to the first half of ECON S-10ab.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and geometry.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 101
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-10ab
Principles of Economics

Bruce D. Watson MA, Master Lecturer on Economics, Boston University and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

David Laibson PhD, Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics, Harvard University

John A. List PhD, Kenneth C. Griffin Distinguished Service Professor in Economics and the College, University of Chicago

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30057 | Section 1

Description
This course covers both micro- and macroeconomics. The microeconomic subjects studied include the workings of the market mechanisms how supply and demand determine the quantities and prices of goods and factors of production and international trade, and how quantities and prices are affected by government intervention. The macroeconomic subjects include the determinants of economic growth, financial institutions, short-run fluctuations in output and employment, inflation, macroeconomics of the open economy, and the role of government policy.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and geometry.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-10b
Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics

Tanseli Savaser PhD, Assistant Professor of Economics, Vassar College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30058 | Section 1

Description
This introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy emphasizes the overall performance of the national economy. Topics include economic growth, financial markets, and the causes and consequences of short-term movements in gross domestic product, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, the budget deficit, and the trade deficit. The course also covers key policy-making institutions, such as the Federal Reserve, and controversies over the proper role of government in stabilizing the economy.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and geometry.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Boylston Hall FONG
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1123
Introduction to Econometrics

Gustavo Vicentini PhD, Teaching Professor of Economics, Northeastern University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31837 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to multiple regression methods for analyzing data in economics and related fields. Students learn how to conduct empirical studies, as well as how to analyze and interpret results from other empirical works. The emphasis is on gaining an intuitive understanding of the principles of econometric analysis and applying them to actual data. We start with the basics of statistics, including some probability theory and basic concepts in sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Topics such as multiple regression techniques as well as issues related to departures from the standard assumptions on the error structure comprise the main subjects to be discussed. Aside from model specification and data problems, the use of additional methods such as instrumental variables, probit/logit, panel data models, and basic time series methods are also part of the course agenda.

Prerequisites: STAT S-100 or the equivalent; students must also pass the proficiency examination.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

ECON S-1297
International Trade

Arhan S Ertan PhD, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of International Trade, Bogazici University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35458 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an analytical framework that can be utilized to study international trade. It is designed to help students understand the nature and determinants of international good and factor movements, and the economic impacts of international trade patterns and trade policy around the world. We develop theories of international trade in order to explain the factors that affect international flow of trade and to analyze the question of whether free trade improves welfare. The implications of various possible restrictions on international trade (import tariffs, quotas, and voluntary export restraints) are discussed. The incentives for countries and international organizations to allow or restrict trade are analyzed. At the end of the semester, students are able to evaluate domestic and international economic implications of trade policies, custom unions, and trade agreements.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a and ECON S-10b or the equivalents.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 202
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1317
The Economics of Emerging Markets: Asia and Eastern Europe

Bruno S. Sergi PhD, Professor of International Economics, University of Messina and Associate, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33001 | Section 1

Description
Today’s global economic landscape is fraught with shifting international geo-economic realms. The potentials of booming economies, fast-developing consumer markets, and the rising middle class represent the characteristics of many emerging market economies. This course covers the promises and the realities of the economies in Asia and Eastern Europe, two vast areas of contrasting development trackways. This course highlights the most appealing economic growth stories, including China, India, Russia, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia, as well as the recent cases of Ukraine and Sri Lanka. This course relies thoroughly on the case study method and probes into the role of institutions, infrastructure, high-tech, innovation, human capital, international trade, and the other macro variables in the sustainable development of these regions. The learning aim of the course is for students to understand the current dynamic and the past development stories of emerging market nations. Students independently research, write, and present up-to-date economic analyses and are involved in up-to-the-minute talks and debates to catch up with these countries’ economic policy strategies.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, William James Hall 105

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1412
Public Finance

Daniel W. Shoag PhD, Associate Professor in Economics, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33534 | Section 1

Description
This course studies the interaction of governments and markets. We cover topics such as taxation, unemployment insurance, welfare programs, social security, health care, education, and regulation. The course emphasizes current policy issues and policy debates.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

ECON S-1452
Money, Financial Institutions, and Markets

Bruce D. Watson MA, Master Lecturer on Economics, Boston University and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31138 | Section 1

Description
This course presents a moderately advanced overview of concepts and techniques in the fields of money, banking, and finance. It examines the agents, instruments, and institutions that make up the financial system of the modern economy, such as bonds, the stock market, derivatives, and the money market, including the role of banks in deposit and credit creation. Along the way, standard concepts and tools of financial analysis are covered, including the risk-return tradeoff (Sharpe ratio), the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), option pricing theory, and the efficient market hypothesis (EMH) and its alternatives.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or equivalent and MGMT S-2000 or equivalent. Introductory statistics, proficiency with ordinary college-level algebra (not linear or matrix algebra), and calculus highly desirable. An introductory finance class is essential.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1476
International Corporate Governance: Economic Theory in Practice

Charles A. Moran JD, Professor Emeritus of Business Administration and Director Emeritus of Financial Planning Program, State University of New York, Cobleskill

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35548 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students interested in the challenges and controversies for corporate governance as it attempts to focus on global problems such as climate change, political uncertainties and the economic and technological disruptions of supply chains, pandemics, and inequalities in the workforce (such as the economic development groups and stakeholder rights). Integrating historical developments, current practices, and proposals for change, we examine international corporate governance topics that collectively are termed agency theory in modern finance. The collaborative efforts as well as the potential conflicts of interests of stakeholders are analyzed in the context of a changing legislative and regulatory environment. This enables us to evaluate the effectiveness of how corporate objectives are determined and achieved in the United States and globally. Selected cases and readings illustrate research findings and highlight critical issues. In-class discussions include the practical challenges of corporate decision making and costs of failures of regulation.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor; ECON S-190 desirable.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 3:15pm-6:15pm, CGIS Knafel K050
Friday, June 23, 3:15pm-6:15pm, CGIS Knafel K050

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ECON S-1534
International Finance and Macroeconomics

Thomas H. Baranga PhD, Lecturer and Concentration Advisor in Economics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35546 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on the international aspects of the macroeconomy, macroeconomic policy, and international financial flows. We start by studying the behavior and determination of the price central to cross-border transactions, the exchange rate. We study the influence of financial markets and international capital flows on the market for foreign exchange. We then develop an open economy macroeconomic model, and analyze the influence of international capital flows on output and unemployment. We study international debt, and the causes of international financial crises. We consider the trade-offs that governments face in their choice of exchange rate regime. Finally, we study how the international financial system has responded to recent global financial crises.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a and ECON S-10b, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Required sections Fridays, time to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1615
Managerial Economics

Aleksandar Tomic PhD, Associate Dean for Strategy, Innovation, and Technology and Director of Master of Science in Applied Analytics and Applied Economics, Woods College of Advancing Studies, Boston College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34161 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an overview of economic tools and analytic approaches available to the manager for business decision making. It includes such topics as pricing, forecasting, demand analysis, production and cost analysis, and macroeconomic policy as it affects the business environment. The purpose of this course is to develop an economic perspective that is appropriate for students aspiring to manage business units or entire companies in a wide variety of industries. Students may not take both ECON E-1600 and ECON S-1615 for degree or certificate credit.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. ECON S-10a or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

ECON S-1814
Urban Economics

Daniel W. Shoag PhD, Associate Professor in Economics, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35556 | Section 1

Description
Why are some cities richer than others? What factors determine where people and companies decide to locate? This course reviews the economic forces that matter at the local level and the impact they have on state and urban policy makers.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10a.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

ECON S-1816
Economics of Innovation

Daniel Johnson PhD, Professor of Economics and Business, Colorado College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34568 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on one key nexus of questions about technological change: how and why innovation occurs, what policies and other factors encourage or discourage innovation, and how technologies develop and evolve in their early life. Using case studies and journal articles as a springboard, we learn the relevant economic concepts as they apply to the topics we cover. We are not limited to events of the computerized age, but discuss technological change from the Industrial Revolution to the present. The course brings in guest speakers (practitioners in Boston) and also teaches professional presentation skills.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS Knafel K050

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ECON S-190
Introduction to Financial and Managerial Economics

James E. Owers PhD, Professor of Finance, Emeritus, J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University

Can Erbil PhD, Professor of the Practice, Department of Economics, Boston College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30298 | Section 1

Description
This course integrates financial economics concepts and their application in making financial decisions for organizations. Students examine the practices and perspectives of financial management, with reference to the foundations of modern finance: economics, managerial organization, and accounting. The course builds conceptual, analytical, and quantitative skills in several topic areas: financial condition and performance, financial planning and control, working capital management, long-term asset decisions based on the critical concept of net present value (NPV), and financial and capital structure. It introduces the concepts and processes of behavioral economics, financial engineering, innovation, and restructuring. The roles of economic value added (EVA) and the balanced scorecard concept in developing managerial strategies and incentive structures are also discussed. While it is not a course in personal finance, many of the concepts and techniques lend themselves to both the management of formal organizations, and the lifetime management of personal finances.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 203
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1900
Financial Accounting

Lloyd John De Leon Tanlu DBA, Associate Professor of Accounting, The Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics, Washington and Lee University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30071 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to financial accounting, its concepts, and the techniques of recording, summarizing, and reporting the flow of financial information through the entity concerned. The course offers an understanding of the information flow process and the necessary techniques for analysis and evaluation of the firm’s potential in light of historical data. Students can count either ECON S-1900 or MGMT S-1000 toward an Extension School degree or certificate, but not both.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ECON S-1900
Financial Accounting

Michael Ruff PhD, Associate Teaching Professsor, D’Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30072 | Section 2

Description
This course introduces financial accounting, which is the language of business, and the process of analyzing, recording, compiling, and reporting financial information through key financial statements. The course also analyzes key financial statement accounts and how financial statement information can inform decision making. Students can count either ECON S-1900 or MGMT S-1000 toward an Extension School degree or certificate, but not both.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Boylston Hall FONG

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1901
Managerial Accounting

Lloyd John De Leon Tanlu DBA, Associate Professor of Accounting, The Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics, Washington and Lee University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30073 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces the principles and methods of data collection and presentation for planning and control, performance evaluation, and management decision making. It emphasizes product costing (both traditional and activity-based), cost-volume-profit analysis, operating and capital budgeting, evaluation of business operating segments, transfer pricing, and relevant costs for decision making. Students can count ECON S-1901 or the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-1600, but not both, toward an Extension School degree or certificate.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ECON S-1915
Neuroinvesting: Neuroscience and Financial Decision Making

Duccio Martelli PhD, Researcher, Department of Economics, University of Perugia

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34468 | Section 1

Description
The study of decision making has a long tradition, particularly in economics, where the choices of economic agents have been analyzed with the aid of a number of methodologies and theoretical models. Many academic researches and empirical evidence show how institutional and retail investors are inclined to make mistakes when making financial decisions; moreover, people do not have stable preferences, but make choices that are influenced by the context and the feelings in which individuals are asked to make a decision. Neuroscience methodologies applied to investments (so-called neuroinvesting) help to explain these anomalies, highlighting how investors’ brains and bodies react to different stimuli and situations. In-depth knowledge of neuroinvesting foundations is then crucial for making informed decisions and therefore better choices, which are consistent with investors’ needs and expectations. This course aims to help participants to understand practical impacts and benefits that neuroscience applied to investments has on investors’ decision-making processes. Starting from an overview about what neuroscience is and how brain activity can be measured, the course describes the underlying mechanisms related to motivations and to judgments under risk and uncertainty. The course focuses on the role of emotions and on investors’ risk perception and risk tolerance. The course ends by introducing pathological choices, ethics, and trust.

Prerequisites: ECON S-10ab or the equivalent; ECON S-190, ECON S-192, or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Boylston Hall 105

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

ECON S-1944
History of Financial Crises, 1637 to the Present

John Komlos PhD, Professor of Economics, Emeritus, University of Munich

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33362 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the 385-year history of financial crises through the great meltdown of 2008 and its aftermath, culminating in the COVID-19 pandemic catastrophe. It investigates recurring historical patterns of financial bubbles, from tulips to bitcoins, without overlooking critical differences. If history repeats itself, why is it so difficult to avoid making the same mistakes? The 2008 financial crisis happened at a time when mainstream macroeconomists (including the former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke) were emphasizing the great moderation, that is, that business cycles have vanished for all practical purposes. These economists were wrong because they disregarded warning signs and used inadequate economic models to gauge the situation. Similarly, the Trump recession occurred just at the time when pundits were boasting of a roaring economy. We also assess our current economic situation, including the bailout of Wall Street that failed to pay adequate attention to the economic problems faced by typical households and the ways in which those problems contributed to the rise of populism. We conclude with the analysis of the COVID-19 recession and the financial problems created in its wake.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

ECON S-70
Personal Finance and Financial Well-Being

Duccio Martelli PhD, Researcher, Department of Economics, University of Perugia

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35466 | Section 1

Description
The need to develop personal finance literacy is an increasingly important issue worldwide, especially in the wake of the latest financial shocks and the current pandemic crisis. The large majority of households do not possess the basic knowledge of financial concepts necessary to effectively manage personal finances and achieve a lifetime of financial wellbeing. This course aims to bridge this gap by providing students a grounding in the fundamental principles and skills of financial planning. It focuses on the analysis of the major topics of personal finance and stresses the importance of behavioral biases that households confront every day in trying to reach their financial goals. The course is structured to meet the needs and expectations of different types of students, from high school and undergraduates to graduate students and adult learners.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Boylston Hall FONG

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

EDUC S-113
Applied Learning Design

Stacie Cassat Green MEd, Principal, 64 Crayons

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35461 | Section 1

Description
In this course, students use a design thinking methodology to design and develop an authentic learning product or experience. Each student prepares a product, such as a course or workshop, social learning community, website, or software application. Using rapid prototyping, students present several iterations of their designs to the class, participate in peer critiques, and continually improve their products over the term. Students also explore case examples of learning products and the learning theories that undergird them.

Prerequisites: DGMD E-55, EDUC E-103, EDUC E-111, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

Stephen Greenblatt PhD, Cogan University Professor of the Humanities, Harvard University

Shaul Bassi PhD, Professor of English, Ca’ Foscari University

ENGL S-140
The Rise of the Novel

Leo Damrosch PhD, Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature, Emeritus, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35352 | Section 1

Description
Literary narrative goes back to ancient times, but the novel, as the term is used today, did not appear until the seventeenth century, and only in the eighteenth century did it establish itself as the dominant literary form of our culture. This course explores the eighteenth-century novels long considered the best and most important, both for their achievement in developing the possibilities of narrative, and for their ability to give pleasure to readers. To bring out the particular qualities of each work, scenes from modern film adaptations are shown whenever available. Issues to be considered include genre (What was new about novels? Is the novel a genre?); features of omniscient, first-person, and epistolary narration; representation of character and subjective experience; the social function of fiction; the attractions of plot; the paradoxes of realism; moral didacticism and its subversion; and differences between British and French fiction. Novels include The Princesse de Cl ves, Robinson Crusoe, Clarissa, Tom Jones, Les Liaisons Dangereuses, and Pride and Prejudice. Due to the condensed summer schedule, the longer works are read in abridged form.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Required sections for undergraduate-credit students to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

ENGL S-182h
Poetry in America: Whitman and Dickinson

Elisa New PhD, Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature, Harvard University

Jesse Benjamin Raber PhD, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35384 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, two influential and iconic American poets of the nineteenth century. First, we encounter Walt Whitman, a quintessentially American writer whose work continues to bear heavily upon the American poetic tradition. We explore Whitman’s relationship to the city, the self, and the body through his life and poetry. Then, we turn to Emily Dickinson, one of America’s most distinctive and prolific poets. While Dickinson wrote nearly 2,000 poems during her lifetime, she chose never to publish, opting instead to revisit and revise her works throughout her lifetime. Keeping this dynamic of self-revision in mind, we consider a number of Dickinson’s poems concerned with nature, art, the self, and darkness. We travel to the Dickinson Collection at Harvard’s Houghton Library, and to Amherst, Massachusetts, paying a visit to the house in which the poet lived and wrote until her death in 1886.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course is offered in partnership with the Poetry in America (PiA) initiative.

Syllabus

ENGL S-207
The Culture of Capitalism

Martin Puchner PhD, Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33124 | Section 1

Description
The course asks how literature, theater, and film have captured the spirit of capitalism fueling its fantasies, contemplating its effects, and chronicling its crises. More than just an economic system, capitalism created new habits of life and mind; it also created new values, forged and distilled by new forms of art. Core readings by Franklin, O’Neill, Rand, Miller, and Mamet, films by Chaplin and Lang, and background readings by Smith, Marx, Taylor, Weber, and Schumpeter.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-1:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Please note: In addition to the scheduled class time, this course has required recorded lectures and activities that students complete on demand. Please see course syllabus for details. The overall amount of time students spend on this course is equivalent to other 4-credit courses.

Syllabus

ENGL S-237
Myth and Mystery in Post-World War II US Fiction

Patrick Whitmarsh PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35659 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on expressions of mystery and the unknown in post-World War II US fiction and how these expressions address the American mythos: the nation’s self-constructed history of exceptionalism and progress. After the triumphal sensationalism of Allied victory in the war and the accompanying economic boom in the US, there began a period of cultural uncertainty with the dawn of the cold war, the civil rights movement, and the uneven rise of global financial markets. Moving chronologically through a mixture of canonical and popular texts including works by Thomas Pynchon, Louise Erdrich, Karen Tei Yamashita, and others we explore the ways that literature taps into this uncertainty. Some central questions this course asks are: what does it mean to think of America as a myth? How does mythic imagery inform national identity? How do different literary genres (science fiction, the detective novel, and the neo-slave narrative) offer unique expressions of the ambiguities that reside in American history and culture? We rely heavily on in-class activities and discussion, complemented by mini-lectures to expand on historical context and background.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

ENGL S-238
Indigenous Literatures

Rebecca H. Hogue PhD, Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35355 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces fiction and poetry in a small sampling of the over 1,000 native nations across North America and Oceania. Thematically, we consider a variety of contemporary issues that impact indigenous story-telling today: environmental and social justice, gender and sexuality, land rights and city life, war and extractive capitalism, and the law and tribal recognition. In our readings, we ask how do the oral, visual, sonic, cosmological, environmental, or political contexts influence contemporary indigenous authors and their writing? Course texts include poetry by Joy Harjo (Muscogee), Haunani Kay Trask (Kanaka Maoli), Craig Santos Perez (Chamoru), Deborah Miranda (Esselen and Chumash), Linda Hogan (Chickasaw), and Natalie Diaz (Mojave), as well as fiction by Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna Pueblo), Patricia Grace (M ori), Tommy Orange (Cheyenne), and Darcy Little Badger (Lipan Apache). With attention to specific histories and traditions, while also considering shared experiences, we explore how literature plays a role in expressing contemporary indigenous sovereignty and self-determination.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ENGL S-257
Superheroes and Power

Stephanie Burt PhD, Professor of English, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35152 | Section 1

Description
What makes superheroes popular? How can they help us think about power, belonging, queerness, race, citizenship, art, or disability? In this course we explore those questions in Marvel and DC favorites (especially the X-Men) as well as in older literature, independent comics, novels, and readings from several critical disciplines.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 1 Story Street 306

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: All students are required to attend and participate during the regularly scheduled class time, either by being present in the classroom or via web conference. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. This course counts for the Aesthetics and Culture Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1165. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

ENGL S-305
Poetry in America for Teachers: Earth, Sea, Sky

Elisa New PhD, Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature, Harvard University

Marissa Grunes PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35543 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed specifically for secondary school educators interested in deepening their expertise as readers and teachers of literature. In the course, we consider the evolving relationship of American poets to the environment from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Emily Dickinson, whose poems on the landscape of rural Massachusetts from the 1850s to 1880s drew from the science and the incipient environmental movements of that century, is a touchstone for the course. But her sparse lyrics are only one of the poetic technologies of looking at, caring for, and mourning the destruction of the natural world that we explore together: from haiku, to African American poems of exploitative agrarianism and fantastical gardening, to poems that expand the scope of nature from the vast and inhuman to the birdcalls echoing in urban backyards. Through field trips, classroom visits, and conversations with ecologists, scientists, gardeners, farmers and other guest interpreters, this course familiarizes students with a variety of canonical and contemporary American poets: Robert Frost, Jean Toomer, Lorine Niedecker, Gary Snyder, A.R. Ammons, Robinson Jeffers, Juliana Spahr, Ross Gay, and more.

Class Meetings:
Online

Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. This course is offered in partnership with the Poetry in America (PiA) initiative. The course is also offered in partnership with the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). Teachers enrolled for noncredit who are interested in professional development can earn certificates of participation for 90 professional development hours from HGSE’s Professional Education. Teachers may apply for Poetry in America scholarships.

Syllabus

Gordon Teskey PhD, Professor of English, Harvard University

ENSC S-106
Problem Solving and Project Design

Kelly Miller PhD, Senior Lecturer on Applied Physics, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35463 | Section 1

Description
In this course, students work on real-world problems that do not have obvious solutions. As part of a project team, students are matched with a client that has a difficult challenge. The project team analyzes the challenge in the context of broader systems and designs a solution to present to the client at the end of the course. The course provides students with the ability to understand how an entire system works; how an action, change, or malfunction in one part of the system affects the rest of the system; and how a big-picture perspective can be adopted to assist in problem solving.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus

ENSC S-135
Biochemical Engineering and Synthetic Life

Sujata K. Bhatia PhD, MD, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Drexel University College of Medicine

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35403 | Section 1

Description
Biochemical engineering harnesses living cells as miniature chemical reactors, enabling the production of designer molecules ranging from pharmaceuticals to plastics to biofuels. Live cells possess unique capabilities to manufacture complex chemical entities, yet living cells also introduce unique challenges and tradeoffs. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of biochemical engineering, including its biological underpinnings, the flow of genetic information within biological systems, the building blocks of living cells, and cellular pathways and control mechanisms. The course then describes the sub-disciplines of genetic engineering and metabolic engineering, along with applications in specialty chemicals, nutrition, global health, environmental remediation, and sustainability. Finally, the course describes emerging areas of biochemical engineering, including synthetic biology, which enables engineers to create entirely new cells from scratch. The visionary J. Craig Venter has called DNA the software of life, and has proposed that synthetic cells will be part of the solution to meeting global demands. The course discusses the potential and pitfalls of synthetic life.

Prerequisites: Background in biology and chemistry is necessary.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

ENSC S-138
Introduction to Probability for Engineering and Data Science

Yue Lu PhD, Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34796 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to probability theory and statistics, and their applications in engineering and data science. Topics include random variables, distributions and densities, conditional expectations, statistical sampling, limit theorems, and Markov chains. The goal of this course is to prepare students with knowledge of probability theory and statistical methods that are widely used in several engineering disciplines and modern data science.

Prerequisites: MATH S-1a and MATH S-1b, or their equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ENSC S-152
Introduction to Biomedical Imaging

Linsey Moyer PhD, Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35596 | Section 1

Description
Non-invasive techniques for analyzing and visualizing a wide range of systems, from nano-sized devices up to the human body, are critical in research, industry, and healthcare. The course is designed as an introduction to the physics and image reconstruction techniques involved in generating images. It is also useful for students in life sciences and engineering disciplines who may need to use imaging to assess their products, devices, or organisms. The course introduces the fundamentals of the major imaging modalities including, but not limited to electron microscopy, optical microscopy, x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear imaging, as well as an overview of in vivo imaging and molecular imaging. The fundamentals of each imaging system coincides with examples of studies from the current literature that explore the applications of these imaging systems to bioengineering, electrical engineering, materials science, and clinical research questions. Through the short projects component of the course, students gain experience with image analysis and have the chance to utilize them in a final project. Students may not take both BIOS S-175 (offered previously) and ENSC E-152 for degree or certificate credit.

Prerequisites: Calculus at the level of MATH S-1b; some exposure to physics and electromagnetism.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-100
Introduction to Environmental Problems and Solutions

Michaela J. Thompson PhD, Lecturer in Anthropology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35391 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces some of the critical environmental problems with which various groups, including scientists and policy makers, have struggled, including climate change, industrial pollution, waste management, and species decline. The purpose of the course is to introduce key disciplines in environmental science, along with their methodologies and approaches to knowledge production; to examine the relationship between environmental science and public policy, both historically and in the present day; and to encourage critical analysis and evaluation of potential approaches to environmental problem solving, with an emphasis on systems thinking. Each class session is divided between lectures and discussions, and often includes break-out group activities. Further, each topical session is also connected to a local case study some historical, some contemporary. By examining these cases and the larger environmental issues that they represent, students gain critical understanding of the scientific, social, political, and economic dimensions of environmental problems.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Northwest Science Building B108

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-102
Design of Renewable Energy Projects

Ramon Sanchez ScD, Research Associate, Environmental Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34438 | Section 1

Description
This course helps students develop the skills to design, fund, and implement renewable energy projects in the United States and around the world. It is aimed at anyone who would like to understand the relationship between energy and the environment, but is particularly helpful for energy developers and current or future professionals in the practice of renewable energy. Students learn the basics of how to design photovoltaic, wind, biomass, geothermal, small-hydro, waste water to energy, solid waste to energy, and other large scale sustainable energy operations. Students also learn about the best global practices for engaging rural and indigenous communities in renewable energy projects while maximizing economic development and social equity. They learn how to deal with other important issues like negotiating land rights for renewable energy projects, how to encourage public utilities and private corporations to sign long-term agreements for purchasing renewable energies, how to prepare project proposals for international financial institutions and private investors who fund these projects, how to estimate the basic health and environmental benefits derived from proposed renewable energy projects, how to monetize health effects of renewable energy projects, and how to quantify the social benefits of such projects in the community.

Prerequisites: High school math and science.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-111
Marine Policy and Ocean Resource Management

Andrew Tirrell PhD, Associate Professor, Political Science and International Relations and Associate Professor of Law, University of San Diego

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33867 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to marine policy and ocean resource management. Students engage with material focused on fisheries management, whaling, marine protected areas, off-shore drilling, and other topics of contemporary relevance, and also consider the cultural and social ties of coastal communities to ocean resources. The course both introduces students to the field of marine resources policy and the environmental and social implications of that policy domestically and internationally, and develops research skills that are broadly applicable to other policy areas. An interactive marine policy negotiation simulation is a highlight of the course.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-117
Sustainability Leadership for the Twenty-First Century

Leith Sharp MEd, Director, Executive Education for Sustainability Leadership, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Jack Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33019 | Section 1

Description
To inspire and enable people to lead effective change towards environmental sustainability, we have created a course to enhance individual change agency skills as applied to a variety of organizational contexts (education, business, government, nonprofit, church, community). The course explores what change leadership for sustainability is, and guides students to advance their related capabilities, competencies, and strategies. The personal, interpersonal, organizational, and technical dimensions of change leadership for sustainability are addressed. A variety of specific case studies and examples of sustainability in practice, including everything from green building design and renewable energy to environmental purchasing are explored. Interdependencies between finance, politics, relationships, capacity building, technology, and more are discussed. Students leave with an experiential knowledge of change management because they are required to complete a project involving a real life change leadership project of their choice. Students typically find this project to be both deeply rewarding and central to the development of their knowledge and confidence as change managers.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-147
International Environmental Governance, Policy, and Social Justice

Andrew Tirrell PhD, Associate Professor, Political Science and International Relations and Associate Professor of Law, University of San Diego

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33398 | Section 1

Description
This course examines both the policy decisions and social justice issues that drive human actions and responses to environmental challenges. We begin by exploring three foundational topics: environmental governance, the global commons, and natural resource valuation. Core concepts from these sessions will continue to arise as we progress into classes focused on particular sectors of environmental policy, such as climate change, sustainable development, energy, and conservation. Upon completion of the course, students are prepared to engage with issues from a wide range of environmental policy areas that touch upon a number of social justice dilemmas. In addition, they further develop the analytic, rhetorical, written, and negotiation skills that are essential to environmental policy and advocacy careers.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-148
Environmental Crises and Systems Collapse

James J. Truncer PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33511 | Section 1

Description
Present-day environmental crises are examined from an historical and analytical perspective investigating the contexts of these developing crises by exploring how past societies adapted, or failed to adapt, to changing environmental conditions. Only certain aspects of these developing environmental crises are completely under human control. As we begin to understand how the components of these crises arise, function, and interact, our control over them is likely to increase. Part of this understanding must come from a consideration of the origin and development of these crises. Studying how earlier societies grappled with environmental crises of their own provides important developmental contexts for our problems and useful lessons on the importance of resilience and adaptation. Students may not count both ANTH S-1060 (offered previously) and ENVR S-148 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, 1 Story Street 302

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-154
Sustainable Product Design and the Innovation Ecosystem

Ramon Sanchez ScD, Research Associate, Environmental Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33169 | Section 1

Description
This course is for anyone who would like to learn how to design and launch a new product with the lowest environmental footprint. Some of the knowledge, tools, and skills that students acquire in this course are how to do market intelligence (technological benchmarking and reverse engineering), how to incorporate real sustainability into new products (and identify green washing), how to use structured tools to enhance creativity and innovation to conceive and develop new products, how to design and implement a new product introduction process, how to write and submit a patent application to decrease legal costs, how to protect copyrights and trademarks, how to fund intellectual property by using funds from business incubators and accelerators, how to select the right materials and processes to minimize the product’s environmental impacts (using green chemistry principles, sustainable sourcing of components, sustainable certification for raw materials to promote conservation), how to reduce energy use by new products, how to build and test prototypes in an inexpensive way, and how to reduce the environmental impacts of packaging and transportation. Students also learn the basic components of an innovation ecosystem and how high technology hubs (Silicon Valley, Boston, New York) work.

Prerequisites: Basic math at a high school level.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-173
The Promise of Sustainable Development

Laurence Simon PhD, Professor of International Development and Director, Center for Global Development and Sustainability, Brandeis University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33646 | Section 1

Description
The world has made progress in reducing extreme poverty and non-communicable disease. Yet our economic growth model both in rich and poor nations has created a global climate crisis. The course explores the promise of sustainable development that integrates natural and social science concerns, and reviews failures of sustainability that have at times increased landlessness, disease, hunger, pollution, and social disintegration. We examine principles and best practices in development and learn underlying concepts in population dynamics, poverty reduction, public health, and technology innovation to meet critical needs in energy and food security. Case studies help us learn the importance of methods for planning, monitoring, and evaluation. Students are introduced to the institutional landscape for development assistance including multilateral agencies such as the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the New Development Bank; bilateral agencies as the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA); nongovernmental organizations as Oxfam, the Aga Khan Development Network, BRAC; and social movements for development and peace such as Sarvodaya Shramadana. The course aims to benefit students seeking a foundation in development as well as those wishing to enhance skills in policy advocacy. Overall, we consider the ethics of development practice that must guide us in challenging development models that marginalize and exclude rather than build equity and opportunity for all the world’s people.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-183
Water in the Twenty-First Century

Sonaar Luthra MPS, Chief Executive Officer, Water Canary

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35559 | Section 1

Description
2022 has signaled a massive transformation in the world’s understanding of the connections between climate change and our planet’s water cycle. A single volcanic eruption off Tonga increased global atmospheric water vapor (our most abundant greenhouse gas) by 5%. Water became a weapon in the Ukrainian war. All rainwater was discovered to contain dangerous levels of forever chemicals. California declared its intention to adapt to diminishing snowpack and rainwater with a commitment to construct four million acre-feet of new water storage infrastructure. Devastating floods submerged one-third of Pakistan underwater. And the United States, for the first time, declared water a national security priority. This course examines how rapid transformations in earth’s hydrological cycle will transform humanity’s relationship to its most precious resource in the decades to come. We start with an overview of the centrality of water to climate change, the orphaned status of water in climate policy and climate talks, the systemic problems that have produced this disconnect, the incentives that sustain it, and the conflicts that result. We then spend each class looking at a specific water development from 2022 that serve as the context for shaping our understanding of the social, political, environmental, and security dimensions of our changing water cycle. In the final stage of the course students critique or devise novel interventions to emerging water problems using systems thinking, scenario planning, and stakeholder-centered design. Through this work, students develop a deeper understanding of how we know what we know about water, the social cost of water illiteracy, and why this knowledge is becoming less relevant to the world we are entering. In the process they enhance their ability to discern what questions must be asked when navigating public and private institutions through the uncertainty that lies ahead.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-184
Economy, Environment, and Sustainable Development

Zinnia Mukherjee PhD, Associate Professor of Economics, Simmons University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35600 | Section 1

Description
The primary focus of this course is to understand the various aspects of economic growth, environmental protection, human development, sustainability, and their interrelationships. What does sustainable development mean? What is the difference between strong sustainability and weak sustainability? What is the relationship between economic efficiency, equity, and sustainability? What role can governments play to ensure economic growth leads to equitable distribution of social wealth? How do human activities affect the sustainability of global resources such as land, forests, and oceans? What roles can communities play in natural resource management and sustainable development? What is the role of international trade patterns and sustainable development? What role do international organizations such as the World Bank and United Nations have in promoting sustainable management of global resources and economic growth? We explore these questions through a series of readings, exams, group discussions, case studies (both contemporary and historical), and by writing a research paper on a course-related topic of choice. Students may not take both ENVR S-184 and ECON S-1665 for degree or certificate credit.

Prerequisites: Some microeconomics (principles level) is helpful. Students must be comfortable with plotting linear functions and solving linear equations.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-186
Enabling a Sustainable Digital Transformation

Ahmad Antar PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35616 | Section 1

Description
The digital age has arrived. The fourth industrial revolution, a fusion of cutting-edge technologies (for example, blockchain, artificial intelligence [AI], metaverse, internet-of-things, hyper-automation, digital twins, and big data) is blurring the boundaries between the physical and digital worlds. Thanks to the great accelerator of the COVID-19 pandemic, digitalization is increasingly ubiquitous in our daily life, defining how we work and radically disrupting how we do business. But such digital transformation carries its own risks and opportunities. The World Economic Forum estimates that digital technologies have the potential to save up to 20 percent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050. Yet, the rapid proliferation of digitalization has far-reaching negative impacts on the environment and society. The ever-growing carbon footprint of the digital sector (for example, hardware, software, networks, and data centers) is now larger than that of the aviation one. Similarly, the digital era has introduced a new wave of societal and ethical concerns arising from the adoption of such technologies. Further understanding of such risks is imperative to make digitalization sustainable in the future. This course introduces students to the sustainability challenges associated with digital technologies. We explore the environmentally and socially responsible use of digital technologies. Course topics include the evaluation of digital carbon footprints, the promise of clean AI, the need for energy-aware computing, the unsustainable role of digital assets (for example, cryptocurrency), the deepening of the digital divide, and the rising tide of climate change disinformation. The course also examines the taxonomy of digital justice, with a focus on ethical issues of emerging technologies. The course draws on case studies and contributions from active practitioners. Throughout the course, students take part in a live learning experience with peer learning opportunities in addition to individual activities.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-191
Community-Based Responses to Disaster

Eric John Cesal MA, Director of Educational Initiatives, Curry Stone Foundation

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35612 | Section 1

Description
In the disaster response industry, there is an adage: there’s no such thing as a natural disaster. We increasingly understand natural disasters as social phenomena, enabled by poor urban policies and set off by physical events like earthquakes and hurricanes. In a future of climate-driven disasters, there is an even stronger imperative to consider the social, economic, and political frameworks that give rise to the conditions which presage disaster. Given that climate-driven disasters will invariably fall harder on the global south, we also face a rising moral imperative to consider how disaster prevention and response can either perpetuate or ameliorate longstanding issues of climate justice. The course begins with an overview of traditional top-down international disaster response frameworks beginning in the mid-twentieth century and charts the evolution of more grassroots, community-driven models. Students are asked to identify an issue of resilience or potential disaster from within their own communities and develop a speculative approach for its resolution. Students are asked to interview and liaise with individuals, groups, and businesses local to their community; diagram community dynamics; and crowd-source ideas for a more livable future. Students then work in teams and extrapolate their lessons learned into a wider proposal for a new model for global disaster response, rooted in community-based practice.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-192
Food Systems and Social Justice

Garrett Broad PhD, Associate Professor, Rowan University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35614 | Section 1

Description
There is widespread agreement that global and local food systems must be improved in order to promote long-term sustainability, but there is widespread disagreement about exactly what those changes should be. This course provides an overview of key approaches and debates in the study and practice of food system change. Students explore the strengths, limits, and tensions of movements for food system reform, food justice, and food sovereignty, as well as examine trade-offs across the domains of environmental, social, and economic sustainability. Further attention is granted to modes of organizing and advocacy, including the role of policy, media, philanthropy, and grassroots activism.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-194
Resilient Communities from the Ground Up

Alison Sant MA, Co-Founder and Partner, Studio for Urban Projects

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35613 | Section 1

Description
For decades, American cities have experimented with ways to remake themselves in response to climate change. These efforts, often driven by grassroots activism, offer valuable lessons for transforming the places we live. This course focuses on the unique ways in which US cities are working to mitigate and adapt to climate change while creating equitable and livable communities in the process. Four main themes and twelve case studies show how US cities are reclaiming their streets from cars, restoring watersheds, growing forests, and adapting shorelines to improve people’s lives while addressing our changing climate. The course relates national models to field study in Boston, Cambridge, and Sommerville, where we meet with local advocates, community groups, government officials, scientists, and urban designers. Students walk the Rose Kennedy Greenway and visit the site of the Big Dig to learn how Boston buried an interstate highway and built a world-class park over it. We ride the region’s evolving bike network, featuring paths that are among the best in the country, and meet with city transportation planners to better understand how bike and scooter shares are complimenting public transit. Tours focus on the ways in which Boston’s efforts to make its streets safer are also a part of its green infrastructure plans to manage stormwater. We examine Boston’s tree canopy, observing how disparities in urban trees correlate to race and income and, subsequently, inequities in exposure to air pollution and extreme heat. We paddle the Charles River and learn about how the Resilient Boston Harbor Plan aims to protect the city from sea-level rise and storm surge by creating green spaces along the city’s 75-km shoreline. Class assignments engage students in researching, measuring, and engaging in group projects related to the themes of the course. Students also have the opportunity to examine how they can take action in their daily lives and careers to support efforts in their own communities for emboldening solutions.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 53 Church Street 201
Field trips may occasionally run later than 3 pm. See course syllabus for details.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-215
Environmental Science

Scot T. Martin PhD, Gordon McKay Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering and Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35392 | Section 1

Description
For the incredibly dynamic and complex world of today, this course provides students a technical and engineering introduction to environmental science. Topics include sustainability, ecosystems, food production, water resources and water pollution, recycling of solid and hazardous waste, nonrenewable energy technology (fossil fuels), energy efficiency and renewable energy technology, air pollution and ozone depletion, and climate change.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry, physics, and biology.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-496
Crafting the Thesis Proposal in Sustainability

Mark Leighton PhD, Associate Director and Senior Research Advisor, Sustainability, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34137 | Section 1

Description
This course helps students develop critical thinking, scholarly writing skills, and research abilities while developing their individual thesis proposals. Class meetings feature lectures and discussions on different scientific approaches, group discussions, and intensive, constructive discussion of proposed student thesis research projects and proposals, from definition of research goals and hypotheses through research design and expected data analysis and presentation. Students should not register for this course unless they are ready to engage in the entire thesis process. They should consider if this is the right time to start independent research, as the goal of the course is to move from crafting the thesis proposal to thesis registration with no extended breaks. Students should begin the thesis project during the next semester or two after completing this course.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, sustainability. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing, have completed at least eight degree-applicable courses with required grades and earned B- or higher in a research methods course. Candidates submit their mandatory prework between February 1 and March 15 to thesis_prework@extension.harvard.edu. Prework requires revisions and must be approved by the research advisor. If approved, permission to register will be sent via email from the ALM Advising Office by May 15. Candidates who do not meet the these degree requirements or do not have their prework approved are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Northwest Science Building B104
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Northwest Science Building B104

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper due Monday, July 31.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-599
Independent Research Capstone

Lindi Dorothee von Mutius JD, Director, Sustainability and Global Development Practice, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32381 | Section 1

Description
This course offers students the overview, direction, and support for completing an individual capstone project, creatively engaging their professional and personal interests. Lectures and discussions explore challenges and opportunities in project scoping, boundary delineation, stakeholder inclusion, impact assessment, and sampling design; logical consistency, lateral thinking, and case study analysis; prototyping, benchmarking, and bet hedging; effective writing, editing, graphic presentation, and information search; and public presentation and network building. Students are asked to prepare a poster of their work to present to the wider graduate community at the end of the semester. Listings of prior projects may be viewed at the Independent Research Capstone website.

Prerequisites: Registration is limited to officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, sustainability, capstone track. Candidates must be in good academic standing, ready to graduate in November with only the capstone left to complete (no other course registration is allowed simultaneously with the capstone), and have successfully completed the precapstone tutorial, ENVR E-598, in the previous term. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 53 Church Street L01
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 53 Church Street L01

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper/project due Friday, August 18.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

ENVR S-599a
Consulting for Sustainability Capstone

William O’Brien MBA, JD, Professor of Practice, School of Management, Clark University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33324 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability candidates. The course imparts knowledge and enhances skills for planning sustainability projects and developing solutions for organizations of at least 50 employees. Appropriate clients may include corporations, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), municipal/state/provincial governments, primary and secondary schools, universities, hospitals, health centers, and regional development agencies. Sustainability solutions refers to working with a client to develop and deliver a customized sustainability action plan (SAP). Common client goals include reduction of operating costs, minimization of the environmental footprint, brand differentiation, and improvement of environmental sustainability practices. Opportunities are identified and initiatives developed in collaboration with the client for both short and long term. Typical areas of focus include energy efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, supply chain management, green IT, and transportation. In support of recommended initiatives, SAPs emphasize a process to foster sustainable behavior, outline key performance indicators to measure performance, and build a sustainability capital reserve to capture cost savings for possible future investments. Deliverables for the course are a SAP document and a presentation to the client stakeholders. During the semester, a substantial amount of time is spent by the instructor providing consultative guidance with knowledge shared by other consultants regarding how to most effectively address organizational requirements and develop actionable solutions. The course structure enables and ensures evaluation of consultant effort through consultant reflections as well as client submission of a satisfaction survey. Past clients have included Adidas; Amazon; Bogota, Columbia; Greater Pittsburgh YMCA; Georgetown University in Qatar; New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation; United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Ganges River Rejuvenation; and the Utah Center for Affordable Housing.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), sustainability. Candidates must be in good academic standing, have successfully completed the Harvard Extension School precapstone tutorial ENVR E-598a in the prior spring term, and be ready to graduate in November with only the capstone left to complete (no other course registration is allowed simultaneously with the capstone). Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Northwest Science Building B105
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Northwest Science Building B105

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper/project due Friday, August 18.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Sarah E. Case PhD, Lecturer, Writing Program, Princeton University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34465 | Section 2

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO E-25, which is a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Janet Sylvester PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34243 | Section 3

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO E-25, which is a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Allyson K. Boggess MFA, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34580 | Section 4

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO E-25, which is a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Steven Wandler PhD, Director of Writing and Professional Communication, St. Catherine University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34902 | Section 5

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO E-25, which is a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-15
Fundamentals of Academic Writing

Collier Brown PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35663 | Section 6

Description
This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO E-25, which is a course required for admission to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-20a
Writing and Literature

Thomas A. Underwood PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35374 | Section 1

Description
Students read literary works and write focused, persuasive essays on literary topics. Discussions encourage students to read closely and think clearly in order to write more effectively. Students learn to write essays that demonstrate their competence as critics.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-20d
Writing about Social and Ethical Issues

Matthew B. Cole PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33881 | Section 1

Description
Students read varying viewpoints on controversial current issues, such as medical ethics, poverty, the environment, race, ethnicity, immigration, privacy, and labor, and learn how to analyze and present conflicting opinions. They learn how to critically analyze texts and write papers in a social science context. They also learn to transform their own assertions and viewpoints into coherent arguments.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Barker Center 114

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-20e
The Essay

Christopher Robert Walsh PhD, Associate Professor of English, Boston University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35609 | Section 1

Description
Students read essays that highlight this literary form’s variety and richness. They write analytical essays that focus on technique and the way other writers use language. Through sequenced assignments, students learn to transform their own experiences, observations, and thoughts into evidence.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Barker Center 114

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Matthew T. Levay PhD, Associate Professor of English, Idaho State University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35019 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Amanda Zecca PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34899 | Section 2

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Emilie J. Raymer PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34582 | Section 3

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper due Monday, July 24.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-25
Academic Writing and Critical Reading

Tran Nguyen PhD, Assistant Professor, Bucknell University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35662 | Section 4

Description
This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum. Students applying to the undergraduate program at the Harvard Extension School must complete this course, but it is open to any student interested in gaining an understanding of academic writing.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Franklin J Schwarzer JD, Attorney, Schlesinger and Buchbinder, LLP

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35015 | Section 1

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Jennifer Ann Doody ALM

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34578 | Section 2

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Randy S. Rosenthal MTS, Editor

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32927 | Section 3

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Kurt Pitzer MFA, Author

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34608 | Section 4

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Cynthia F. C. Hill PhD, Science Teacher, The Lawrenceville School

Geoffrey Hill PhD, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, The Graduate School, Princeton University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34573 | Section 5

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

Gillian M. Sinnott SJD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33970 | Section 6

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am, Robinson Hall 105
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am, Robinson Hall 105

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Final paper due Monday, July 24.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-34
Business Rhetoric

John Robert Sampson PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35664 | Section 7

Description
This course helps business professionals improve their writing so they are better equipped to accomplish their educational and professional goals. Students consider how essential forms of business writing memos, cover letters, proposals, presentations, and reports address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, use key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course fosters skills in drafting, revising, peer review, and using sources responsibly. It also offers sustained practice in constructing clear and precise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-42a
Writing in the Humanities

Patricia M. Bellanca PhD, Head Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35021 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the humanities. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Harvard Extension School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the work of reading, writing about, and conducting research on literary texts.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-42b
Writing in the Social Sciences

Ross Martin PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35174 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the social sciences. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Extension or Summer School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the various social science disciplines and their approaches, while also learning how to become critical consumers of social science research. Students develop their own independent research project in the social science field of their choosing. This project lasts the entire semester and involves developing a viable research question; learning how to find, analyze, and interpret resources appropriately; and, finally, developing and refining an original argument in a final paper.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-42b
Writing in the Social Sciences

Erin Danielle Routon PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33884 | Section 2

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the social sciences. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Extension or Summer School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the various social science disciplines and their approaches, while also learning how to become critical consumers of social science research. Students develop their own independent research project in the social science field of their choosing. This project lasts the entire semester and involves developing a viable research question; learning how to find, analyze, and interpret resources appropriately; and, finally, developing and refining an original argument in a final paper.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-42c
Writing in the Sciences

Thomas Akbari MA, Lecturer in English, Northeastern University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33356 | Section 1

Description
This course provides instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the natural, computational, or applied sciences. Through critical reading of key examples of the genres of scientific literature, students study how scientific texts address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, deploy key terms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course’s workshop approach fosters skills in revision, peer review, and research into the scientific literature. The course offers writing strategies for successful communication in the field, including concise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents. Projects include an academic research paper on a topic of a student’s choice in a form common to most scientific disciplines. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Harvard Extension School or graduate study elsewhere.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

EXPO S-49
Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations

Terry Gipson MFA, Preceptor in Public Speaking, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35605 | Section 1

Description
A theoretical and practical introduction to the role of strategic communication and public relations in corporate, nonprofit, and political spheres. Includes analysis and practical application of the skills involved in building strategic communication relationships with various publics and core audiences.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

Alice A. Jardine PhD, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, Harvard University

Loren K. Wolfe PhD, Instructor, Media, Arts, and Culture, Pantheon-Sorbonne, Paris

FREN S-Aa
Beginning French I

Yan Zhao MA, Doctoral Candidate, Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33550 | Section 1

Description
This beginning French course provides an introduction to French with emphasis on interpersonal communication and the interpretation and production of language in written and oral forms. Students engage in interactive communicative activities that provide rich exposure to the French language and francophone cultures. Students engage in the discussion and interpretation of various French-language media sources including video, images, music, and film. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course French 10.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 9:30am-11:30am, Boylston Hall 103

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

FREN S-Aa
Beginning French I

Anne Ratnoff MA, Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34900 | Section 2

Description
This beginning French course provides an introduction to French with emphasis on interpersonal communication and the interpretation and production of language in written and oral forms. Students engage in interactive communicative activities designed for the virtual classroom that provide rich exposure to the French language and francophone cultures. Students engage in the discussion and interpretation of various French-language media sources including video, images, music, and film. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course French 10.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-2:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

FREN S-C
Intermediate French: Francophone Culture in Local Communities

Lisa Anne Kostur AM, Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35045 | Section 1

Description
This intermediate-level language course explores cultural topics such as music, dance, and cuisine in France and other French-speaking countries. We in turn expand our discovery of Francophone cultures through conversations with language partners, interactive discussions with French-speaking guests, and virtual exploration of French-speaking communities. Themes such as family life in West Africa, sustainability in the French-speaking Pacific, and First Nation dancers in Quebec are broached through communicative activities in order to build on oral, written, and intercultural competences. Using various texts, films, and multimedia resources as a basis for discussion, we also build vocabulary and review and refine various grammatical structures. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences French 20.

Prerequisites: Beginning-level college French courses or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Boylston Hall 104

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

John T. Hamilton PhD, William R. Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Lisa Parkes PhD, Senior Lecturer on Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

John T. Hamilton PhD, William R. Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

GERM S-Bab
Beginning German

Bastian Lasse MA, Doctoral Candidate in Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31838 | Section 1

Description
This intensive beginning course introduces the fundamentals of the German language typically taught over two semesters. The main goal is functional competence in German, including the vocabulary, grammar, and cultural knowledge to be able to interpret oral and written input, and to communicate in speaking and writing in everyday situations. The curriculum is designed to highlight comparisons of German, Swiss, and Austrian culture with students’ own cultural backgrounds. In addition, students are guided through reading strategies that enable them to interpret and compose different types of texts.

Prerequisites: This course is designed for students without prior knowledge of German. Students who have taken three years or more of German at the high school level are not eligible to take this course. For more information please contact the instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 9:30am-1:00pm, Lamont Library 240

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

GERM S-R
German for Reading Knowledge

Daniel Carranza PhD, Assistant Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31302 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students who wish to acquire a precise reading knowledge of sophisticated German prose for research, study, and/or career purposes. The course focuses on grammar topics, parsing, and translation, for which texts from a variety of fields are employed. Starting the course with no knowledge of German, students are able to decipher and translate Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Sigmund Freud and read scholarship in their field of specialization by the end of the course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 10:00am-1:00pm
Friday, June 23, 10:00am-1:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-10
Introduction to Political Philosophy

Andrew F. March DPhil, Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30154 | Section 1

Description
This course investigates the central problems of political theory that concern the justification and operation of democratic forms of government. What is democracy? What is the proper purpose and scope of political life? How can we judge between different political systems and assess their relative merits and virtues? What are the various ends of political life and how do they conflict? What is the relationship between democracy and other values or goods, like rights, justice, equality, and solidarity? What is the purpose of democracy and the strongest defense of it? Given the purposes of democracy, how is it attained and preserved? What are some of the most urgent contemporary debates and controversies in democratic theory and practice? We take up these questions by reading a combination of classical works of modern political philosophy from Machiavelli to Marx, along with contemporary work in political theory.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, CGIS South S010

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1045
Justice: Ethics in an Age of Pandemic and Racial Reckoning

Sergio Imparato PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35084 | Section 1

Description
What is a just society? What do we owe one another as citizens? What is a good life? These questions, long debated by philosophers, arise with special urgency at a time of pandemic and racial reckoning. The course explores these questions by considering how philosophers have tried to answer them, and by debating contemporary issues in politics and everyday life that prompt us to ask questions such as, what is the right thing to do? Topics include controversies about equality and inequality, individual rights and the common good, the role of government and markets, and competing conceptions of identity and community. Cases include ethical questions arising from the pandemic and recent debates about racial justice.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1057
Global Political Thought

Andrew F. March DPhil, Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35592 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to studying political thought and political theory in a global, transnational, and comparative way. The core problems are both what it means to study the normative and ideological dimensions of politics across the divides of distinct traditions and also what is involved in treating the entire globe as the proper scope for political thought. The course examines a number of core problems of political theory (for example, democracy and legitimacy, violence and action, and the nature and content of rights) from a variety of non-Western perspectives.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, CGIS South S010

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1116
Populism and the Erosion of Democracy

Jeeyang Rhee Baum PhD, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35566 | Section 1

Description
What is populism, and how much of a threat is it to democracy? The recent rise of authoritarian-populism, across both long-established and developing democracies, has posed new challenges for good governance. This course explores the conditions for the rise of populism, evaluates how much of a threat it poses for democracy, and examines the different forms it takes. Topics include: the role of economic grievances, immigration trends, civic culture, electoral rules, and party competition. We examine these topics through a range of comparative country cases including the United States, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Hungary, Turkey, the Philippines, and India.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1232
Transnational Politics and Eastern Europe

Felix Krawatzek DPhil, Senior Researcher, Centre for East European and International Studies

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35606 | Section 1

Description
In this course we study key concepts in migration scholarship. We look at the theoretical foundations for the most important debates in migration studies and develop a better understanding of terms such as transnationalism, diaspora, and remittances. We apply these concepts with a particular attention to migration across Eastern Europe, but also include examples from other world regions. We integrate the interdisciplinary social science literature in migration studies and therefore draw on readings from history, sociology, political science, and anthropology. The course begins with a review of the foundational concepts of transnationalism, diaspora, and the state’s impact on the reality of migrants. We then seek to understand how the children of migrants, the second generation, navigate their relationship between here and there. Next, the course addresses questions of identity and its changes in the context of migration and the impact that migration has on sending and receiving states by looking at remittances and the political relevance of those that have left their home country. Students gain a profound understanding of the most contentious debates taking place in migration scholarship and empirical insights into a range of contemporary and historical cases with a focus on the highly relevant case of Eastern Europe’s transnationalism in a global context.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, CGIS South S003

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1242
Power and Politics in Greater China

David A. Rezvani DPhil, Lecturer in Writing, Dartmouth College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35380 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to key concepts, actors, and events in the politics of greater China. Does democracy or China’s current system of rule have bigger advantages? What are the key sources of China’s remarkable economic growth? What is the nature of accountability and informal institutions within the Middle Kingdom? In light of China’s policies toward Taiwan, Hong Kong, Xinjiang, and the South China Sea, is China a status quo or revisionist power? Students confront these and a wide range of other pivotal economic, security, and global controversies. Students debate and assess the merits of China’s policies on issues such as the China model, economic growth, authoritarian resilience, decentralization, informal institutions, and media censorship, as well as the relations of China’s government with domestic, regional, and international actors. The course includes independent research, intensive writing, and debates on the conditions both within and beyond greater China.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS Knafel K050
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS Knafel K050
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1282
The Political Economy of China

Hong Zhang PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35607 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces the key issues and debates concerning China’s economy. It provides the historical background and analytical tools for students to comprehend China’s remarkable economic rise in the past decades as well as problems that are threatening China’s future. We discuss the political economy of China with a particular focus on state-society relations. The course is organized around several themes: the evolution of the economic system from socialism to capitalism; how the state governs the market and businesses, and how economic policies are made and implemented; how economic benefits and costs are distributed among the population; and impacts of China’s increasingly global economic presence on the other parts of the world. Students are to develop a broad understanding of the Chinese political economy and the conceptual tools with which to analyze it.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1285
Politics and Governance in the Global South

Julie A. Weaver PhD, Lecturer on Social Studies and on Government, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35388 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to politics and the political economy of development in low-income countries. What are the main political and governance challenges low-income countries face and what are the best prospects for addressing them? How do political and institutional constraints, like poor accountability, frail institutions, and weak rule of law, impact how global south countries provide the public goods and policies their citizens demand? How does a country’s income level influence politics and governance, and how is it influenced by them in turn? Drawing on both theoretical and empirical social science research, this course explores these questions by blending theory and case studies drawn primarily from Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia. Main themes to be covered include state and institutional strength, political representation, and accountability, as well as more specific areas of governance and democratic practice such as public goods provision, corruption, international development aid, civil society and activism, gender, diversity and inequality, and managing public crises.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS South S003

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course is a Summer Seminar. Learn more about Summer Seminars on this page. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1315
Race and US Politics

Tess Wise PhD, Assistant Professor, Politics and International Affairs, Wake Forest University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35134 | Section 1

Description
This course elucidates American racial politics through a combination of theoretical and historical approaches. Theoretical issues include race as a social construct, political friendship theory, and racial contract theory. Historical material includes settler colonialism, Harvard University’s racial history, enslavement, civil rights, migration, and the census. Politics in practice covers dog-whistle politics, representation, social movements, policing, mass incarceration, and reparations. Students learn to think critically and have informed conversations about race, connecting course content to current events.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

GOVT S-1362
Political Communication

Matthew A. Baum PhD, Marvin Kalb Professor of Global Communications and Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33306 | Section 1

Description
This course considers the degree to which Americans’ political opinions and actions are influenced by the mass media and the influence that public opinion and the mass media, in turn, have on public policy. Topics to be covered include the history of the mass media, recent trends in the media, theories of attitude formation and change, the nature of news, the implications for political communication of changes in media (the rise of the internet, social media, and partisan media), the ways in which the news shapes the public’s perceptions of the political world, campaign communication, how the media and public opinion affect the manner in which public officials govern, and the general role of the media and public opinion in the democratic process.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1550
Domestic Politics and Foreign Policy

Matthew A. Baum PhD, Marvin Kalb Professor of Global Communications and Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33308 | Section 1

Description
This seminar surveys the theoretical and empirical literature on the influence of domestic politics on foreign policy and international politics, with a primary, though not exclusive, emphasis on American foreign policy. Scholars have long recognized that domestic politics influences states’ decision making in international trade and finance. Yet, in recent years we have witnessed an explosion of interest in understanding the linkage between domestic politics and international relations more broadly, including the decidedly high politics arena of war and peace. We review a variety of theoretical perspectives concerning both international economics and international security, ranging from the role of individuals and individual psychology, to the influence of interest groups, political institutions, the mass media, and public opinion. The goal is to assess the strengths and weaknesses of domestic political explanations for policy outcomes in foreign policy and international affairs.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1723
Propaganda, Past and Present

George Soroka PhD, Lecturer on Government, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35572 | Section 1

Description
Propaganda has been a factor in politics since antiquity, but in an age when social media has made disseminating ideas easier than ever and the terms fake news and alternative facts have entered the popular lexicon, it appears particularly pernicious. Studying what political propaganda is, as well as by whom (and how) it is disseminated and what its goals are, is therefore particularly relevant today. This course begins by looking at the history of the term and its theoretical underpinnings, distinguishing it from related but nevertheless distinct forms of persuasive speech (for example, advertising, op-eds, and polemics) and obvious misinformation. Next, we examine various examples of propaganda and their manifestations, both historical as well as more contemporaneous (for example, World War I and World War II, Russian and Chinese troll farms, and the 2021 US Capitol riot). The course concludes by considering the normative implications of political propaganda for the societies we live in.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 101

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1726
Intelligence and International Security

Michael David Miner PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34823 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the opaque world of intelligence and international security. The course begins with a survey of disciplines and methods of analysis before reviewing intelligence requirements as a component in policy processes that drive and inform decision making within the national security system. We consider various intelligence related topics including espionage, covert action, politicization, counterintelligence, public oversight, intelligence failure, and reform. The course strikes a balance between contemporary issues and the storied histories of intelligence systems around the world. Though predominantly focused on the United States, the course also considers intelligence activities in the United Kingdom, Russia, China, and elsewhere. Students grapple with historical and hypothetical problem sets based on real-world scenarios to develop assessment capabilities. Required readings and assignments draw on classic and influential work in addition to declassified documents which illuminate the historical narrative in a tangible way. The course concludes with reflections on how past experience informs current perspectives and might elucidate future intelligence requirements to better anticipate and understand the changing world.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1729
Debates in International Politics

David A. Rezvani DPhil, Lecturer in Writing, Dartmouth College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33627 | Section 1

Description
This course critically examines arguments, analytical frameworks, and potential solutions for major controversies in international politics. What causes terrorism? What should countries do to solve global warming? Should economic distributive justice only exist within nation states or should it apply globally? What are the sources of state failure? Students confront these and a wide range of other key economic, security, and global controversies. The first part of the course critically examines sources of international conflict such as insurgency, guerilla warfare, corruption, and imperialism. The course then investigates questions of international order and cooperation with regard to international injustice, sovereignty, market-preserving federalism, environmental degradation, and problems of global governance.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 8:30am-11:30am, CGIS Knafel K108
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1731
The Future of War: Conflict and Order in the Twenty-First Century

Thomas M. Nichols PhD, Professor Emeritus of National Security Affairs, Naval War College and Staff Writer, The Atlantic

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32963 | Section 1

Description
This course is about the future of war and considers how both the reasons and the ways states go to war are changing. The course considers questions such as the following: How and why have states gone to war in the past? What were considered legitimate reasons for going to war? How will violence in the international system be governed in a world where norms about the use of force have changed? Specific topics to be addressed include the problem of military force for humanitarian intervention, the future of nuclear deterrence, the dilemma of preventive war, coercive approaches to nuclear nonproliferation, and ethical issues related to military conflicts in failed states or with nonstate actors.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Maxwell-Dworkin G115
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: On-campus meetings are recorded. A live stream is available at the time the class meets. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. See minimum technology requirements. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

GOVT S-1744
Women, Peace, and Security

Joan Johnson-Freese PhD, Senior Fellow, Women in International Security

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34443 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the increasingly recognized role of women in global peace and security affairs, as demonstrated by the groundbreaking UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) that over 80 countries have National Action Plans to implement, the lifting of bans on women in combat roles in many countries, and the bipartisan 2017 passage of the first of its kind Women, Peace and Security Act in the US. From politics to the military, education, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and grass roots organizations, women are involved in conflict prevention and peace building. The course examines various perspectives on empowering women to play positive, active roles in these areas.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference with Required On-Campus Weekend
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Saturday, Sunday, June 24-25, 9:00am-5:00pm, One Brattle Square 205

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Along with the web-conference meetings, this course also includes an intensive—and mandatory—weekend residency. Students must be present for the entire on-campus weekend session to earn credit for the course. The course begins via web conference during the first week of the term and continues to meet throughout the term. Please see the syllabus for the specific course meeting dates. Tuition does not include hotel accommodations, transportation, or meals for the on-campus weekend session. International Students see important visa information. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1749
The Political Economy of Globalization: Challenges and Opportunities

Thomas Gift PhD, Associate Professor of Political Science, University College London

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33666 | Section 1

Description
The late twentieth- and early twenty-first centuries have brought many unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Even as Brexit has exposed gaping fault lines in the internationalist agenda, globalization and the flattening of the world mean that countries and individuals are intertwined like never before in history. Against this backdrop, standards of living in many countries have skyrocketed, millions of people have escaped poverty, and countless others have capitalized on new opportunities in work and life. At the same time, serious problems have emerged that pose a threat to sustained peace and prosperity across the globe. In this course, we explore the nature of these challenges and opportunities, why they have arisen, and what they portend for the future political and economic trajectory of citizens and societies. Particular attention is paid to topics such as global governance, labor markets, social policy, growth strategies, democracy and human rights, migration, and the environment. By the end of the course, students better understand what globalization is, what aspects of modern political and economic systems are due to globalization, the key advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and how globalization influences an array of exigent policy issues.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

John Park PhD, Director, Korea Project, Harvard Kennedy School

GOVT S-1786
Globalization and the Nation-State: Theories and Case Studies

Nicolas Prevelakis PhD, Associate Senior Lecturer on Social Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35405 | Section 1

Description
Despite globalization, the United States is still a major actor in today’s world. This course tries to understand why this is so by examining the role that nationalism plays in peoples’ identities and the effects of globalization on nations and nation-states. Has globalization undermined national sovereignty? What are its effects on global poverty, inequalities, and democracy? And to what extent are nation-states useful in addressing global issues? The course looks at theories as well as case studies from the recent rise of populism and authoritarianism, the role of supranational entities such as the European Union, and the urgency of global issues such as artificial intelligence, climate change, inequality, migration, and security. Examples are drawn from the United States, Europe, Latin America, China, and the Middle East.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-1865
US-Mexico Politics

Viridiana Rios PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34494 | Section 1

Description
Mexico is one of the most important political and strategic allies of the US. The histories of both nations are deeply intertwined, and their relationship exhibits a unique combination of characteristics unseen in other neighbor states. In this course students discover the fascinating complexities of the US-Mexico relationship across five policy areas: trade, migration, security, energy, and public health. Among other topics, we examine the true extent of the commercial partnership between the two countries, how Mexican drug cartels operate and their complex linkages to the US opioid epidemic, and myths and facts surrounding Mexican and Central American migration. We also discuss how deepened US-Mexico cooperation could address many policy challenges, from climate crisis to affordable health care. By the end of the summer, students develop a sharp understanding of the challenges facing the US-Mexico relationship and a variety of possible strategies to address them.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-20
Introduction to Comparative Politics

George Soroka PhD, Lecturer on Government, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32003 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an introduction to concepts, theories, and evidence in the field of comparative politics. Topics include origins of nation-states, democracy and authoritarianism, social revolutions, politics of economic development, ethnicity and ethnic violence, modernization, political culture, institutions, and civil society. The empirical evidence is drawn from cases in Africa (Nigeria and Rwanda), the Americas (Mexico and the United States), Asia (China, India, and South Korea), Europe (Britain and Germany), post-communist areas (Russia and former Yugoslavia), and the Middle East (Iran).

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 50 students

Syllabus

GOVT S-40
International Conflict and Cooperation

Dustin Tingley PhD, Professor of Government, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30155 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to the analysis of the causes and character of international conflict and cooperation. Theories of international relations are presented and then applied to contemporary and historical cases. The course begins with a foundational review of the different levels at which states interact and the primary theoretical paradigms in the field. It then addresses how states achieve cooperation in the face of international anarchy, a question that has attracted the attention of scholars since Thucydides. The course next addresses basic bargaining theory, which uses insights from economics to explore how bargaining breakdowns, commitment problems, and incomplete information can lead to war. Thereafter we examine three popular topics in contemporary international relations research: the roles that psychology, leaders, and domestic politics play in explaining international conflict and cooperation. We also explore the sources and effects of international institutions such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization. We spend a week studying terrorism, a problem of particular significance in the modern world. We also look at trade, foreign aid, international development, and climate change. We conclude with international law and an exploration of the future of international relations.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 72 students

Syllabus

GREK S-Aa
Beginning Greek

Nathaniel Herter AM, Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35168 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to ancient Greek. Students learn the fundamental rules of morphology and syntax while acquiring a basic vocabulary in the language. Additionally, students develop an appreciation for the literature, history, and culture of classical Athens through readings inspired by the works of literary figures such as Aristophanes, Plato, and Herodotus. Students who successfully complete the course are suitably prepared to continue their ancient Greek journey into more advanced courses.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking introductory Greek or Latin, or CLAS S-97a. See the department’s website for more information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

GREK S-Aab
Intensive Beginning Greek

Alexander Vega AM, Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Louis Zweig MPhil, Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31871 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students with little or no prior instruction in ancient Greek who are committed to learning the language at rapid speed. Equivalent to the first two semesters of college-level instruction, it covers all basic grammar and vocabulary while offering considerable practice in reading. By the end of the course students are sufficiently prepared to read continuous passages of poetry (Homer, Aristophanes, and Euripides) and prose (Plato, Herodotus, and Lysias) with the aid of a dictionary.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 10:00am-12:00pm, Boylston Hall 237
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 1:00pm-3:00pm, Boylston Hall 237

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking introductory Greek or Latin, or CLAS S-97a. See the department’s website for more information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

Myriam Pilutti Namer PhD, Adjunct Professor of Archaeology and Art History, Ca’ Foscari University

Martina Frank PhD, Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage, Ca’ Foscari University

HARC S-183
The Architecture of Boston

Alexander von Hoffman PhD, Lecturer in Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35455 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the evolution of Boston’s architecture and urban form from the city’s founding to the present. Through slide lectures, readings, guided and self-guided team tours, internet investigations, and in-class discussions, we study the works of major designers such as Charles Bulfinch, H. H. Richardson, Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Walter Gropius, I. M. Pei, Philip Johnson, Frank Gehry, Steven Holl, Machado-Silvetti, and Renzo Piano. Together we investigate the development of Boston’s renown buildings, park landscapes, and neighborhoods as it evolved from the leading town in British North America to one of the great cities of the United States. Students learn about the forces that generated Boston’s architecture and urban design and the city’s important contributions to American architecture, and in the process receive an introduction to American architectural history. The course also features guest lectures by practicing architects.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Boylston Hall 104
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

HARC S-197
Contemporary Photography: War and Conflict

Makeda Best PhD, Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography, Harvard Art Museums, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34739 | Section 1

Description
Beyond the art and art history, photographs of war and conflict engage disciplines and fields ranging from history and public policy to journalism, environmental studies, psychology, and literature. Among other issues, this course explores how photographs of contemporary conflict have impacted contemporary life, the media, ethics and morality, public perceptions about war and foreign policy, the history of photography, and the role of the photographic documentarian in society. Contemporary war photographs circulate in various forms from social media outlets to photobooks to museum walls. The conflicts of our present era have coincided with a burgeoning field of photographic image production and writing and theorizing about photography as an art form, instrumental tool, and cultural and political force. By approaching the topic through a range of texts from multiple perspectives, we explore how contemporary war photographs drive political discourse and transform the meanings of contemporary conflicts, disrupt ideas about art and warfare, challenge notions of photographic truth, impact the role of photography in the museum, and raise new ethical dilemmas around issues of privacy and public policy.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

HIST S-1156
The Birth of Europe: 16th to 18th Centuries

Tiphaine Guillabert PhD, Associate of the Department of History, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35627 | Section 1

Description
This course covers the origins of Europe from a political perspective. We observe how Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, Great Britain, and France competed against each other to increase their power over Europe in a real-life game of thrones. Topics include government models from absolutism to republicanism, economic systems related to capitalism, war and diplomacy, artistic politics from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, and social control from court elites to Jewish ghettos.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 104

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

Giulia Delogu PhD, Assistant Professor of Early Modern History, Ca’ Foscari University

HIST S-1225
The Rise of the Far Right in Europe

John R. Boonstra PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35365 | Section 1

Description
Far-right movements have, in recent years, gained striking momentum across Europe. From France’s anti-immigrant National Front and neo-Nazis in Germany to efforts to rehabilitate Francisco Franco and Benito Mussolini in Spain and Italy, forces of extreme nationalism, xenophobia, and imperial nostalgia have increased in prominence as well as popularity. The current moment is not, of course, the first time that the continent has experienced a rise in right-wing extremism. Fascism, from the 1920s onward, likewise offered violent, totalitarian solutions to the tensions of mass politics and populist resentment in polarized societies. How, precisely, do today’s reactionary political formations relate to their fascistic forebears? What social and cultural dynamics is each responding to and, perhaps just as significantly, what historical legacies are they drawing on? In this course, we ask first how has the present wave of far-right parties in western Europe tapped into notions of national decline, instability, and changing demographics? Second, what can we learn about these movements by studying early twentieth-century histories of fascist movements and regimes in France, Germany, Spain, and Italy? And finally, how have these histories been obscured, distorted, remembered, rehabilitated, and resisted in different ways in each of these countries? By moving from contemporary cases of resurgent nationalist sentiment to their interwar predecessors and back again, and through a consideration of novels, films, memoirs, historical documents, artworks, and monuments, the course seeks to uncover how anxieties of migration, race, and empire as well as changing roles of religion, gender, and nationhood shaped political animosities and allegiances within the European far right both a century ago and today.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

HIST S-1827
The United States and China: Opium War to the Present

Erez Manela PhD, Professor of History, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35006 | Section 1

Description
The relationship between China and the United States is now, and will likely continue to be, among the most important international relationships of our era. But this relationship has a long history, a history which we must study if we wish to understand present and future challenges and opportunities more fully. In this course, students explore diverse aspects of the history of Sino-American relations since the early nineteenth century. We cover major episodes such as the Boxer intervention, the first and second world wars, the Korean War, the Mao-Nixon rapprochement, and the post-Mao relationship. We also examine central themes such as trade, migration, cultural perceptions, war, and revolution.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

Joyce E. Chaplin PhD, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History, Harvard University

HSCI S-111
Science and Politics: Current Debates in Historical Perspective

Liv H. M. J. Grjebine DPhil, Research Associate in the History of Science, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35542 | Section 1

Description
This course aims to understand the complex relationship between science and politics. We shed light on current debates by analyzing a selection of historical turning points. People often assume that the objectivity of science depends on the separation between science and politics. However, science and politics have always been interrelated. Scientists are frequently subjected to the decisions of the politicians who finance them and who speak in their names. Moreover, scientists often have to be savvy politicians, using strategies to gain position, funding, and recognition. Publicizing a new discovery or promoting a new theory requires not only scientific evidence, but also political skills, especially when scientists seek to overthrow a dominant theory. What does this mean for the objective ideals of science? How can we expect the public to trust science when politics is often accused of distorting science? What is the line between normal interactions between science and politics and extraordinary or dangerous ones?

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

Shigehisa Kuriyama PhD, Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History, Harvard University

HSCI S-202
Deadly Diseases: Epidemics Throughout History

Sean Tath O’Donnell PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35078 | Section 1

Description
Outbreaks of epidemic disease have played a role in shaping human societies from the beginning of recorded history, transforming demographic patterns, social practices, and cultural expectations. Although they take fewer lives than the diseases we encounter every day, epidemics possess an extraordinary hold over our collective imagination; this course seeks to understand why. Through an analysis of the Black Death to COVID-19, we explore the place of epidemic disease in human history, taking into account how those living in different times and places have responded when epidemics have appeared.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Science Center 110

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

HUMA S-100
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Dramatic Arts, English, and Religion

Collier Brown PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33838 | Section 1

Description
In this proseminar, students develop the skills necessary to produce graduate-level research on a topic relevant to a humanities-related field. This course focuses on magical realism in global modern fiction. During the first part of the course, we read Guinean author Camara Laye’s The Radiance of the King, a classic in the genre of magical realism, early twentieth-century modernism, and African and world literature. In the second part, students write a ten-page research paper, analyzing a work of magical realism and engaging in the existing scholarship about it. Apart from expository writing prerequisites, this is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree. While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42a is strongly recommended. In addition, at the first meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and capacity for coherent logical argument.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

HUMA S-101
Proseminar: Elements of the Writer’s Craft

Anne Elliott MFA, MFA

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34857 | Section 1

Description
This is an intensive course in the craft and analysis of prose from a writer’s perspective. The focus of this course is to teach prose writers how to read well. Students explore the potential and possibilities of different approaches to writing, and, by the end of the course, apply their close reading to their own fiction and nonfiction. The goal of this course is to build a deep understanding of key elements of craft through close reading and textual analysis of the work of master prose writers. We analyze the work of these writers, discussing how they employ structure, character, setting, dialogue, point of view, and other aspects of craft. Students write critically and creatively, both in class and out of class, about the works under discussion and about possible applications to their own creative writing. Students examine the conscious choices about craft that published writers make in order to fully realize a piece of writing.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42a is strongly recommended. Students in this course are expected to have a firm command of grammar, syntax, and prose composition, and to have read widely.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

HUMA S-101
Proseminar: Elements of the Writer’s Craft

Leah De Forest MFA, Writer

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34141 | Section 2

Description
This is an intensive course in the craft and analysis of prose from a writer’s perspective. The focus of this course is to teach prose writers how to read well. Students explore the potential and possibilities of different approaches to writing, and, by the end of the course, apply their close reading to their own fiction and nonfiction. The goal of this course is to build a deep understanding of key elements of craft through close reading and textual analysis of the work of master prose writers. We analyze the work of these writers, discussing how they employ structure, character, setting, dialogue, point of view, and other aspects of craft. Students write critically and creatively, both in class and out of class, about the works under discussion and about possible applications to their own creative writing. Students examine the conscious choices about craft that published writers make in order to fully realize a piece of writing.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42a is strongly recommended. Students in this course are expected to have a firm command of grammar, syntax, and prose composition, and to have read widely.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

HUMA S-110
Masterpieces of World Literature

Martin Puchner PhD, Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

David Damrosch PhD, Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33501 | Section 1

Description
This course surveys world literature from The Epic of Gilgamesh to the present, with an emphasis on different cultures and writing traditions. Produced by HarvardX, the course is based not on lectures but on a more vivid dialogue format between instructors Martin Puchner and David Damrosch. The course also includes travel footage from Istanbul and Troy to Jaipur and Weimar, interviews with authors, such as Orhan Pamuk and other experts, and is offered through combination of pre-recorded materials, online discussions, and live sessions.

Class Meetings:
Online

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: The recorded lectures are from the HarvardX course Masterpieces of World Literature.

Syllabus

HUMA S-111
Narratives of Mental Health and Mental Illness

Karen Thornber PhD, Harry Tuchman Levin Professor in Literature, Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35533 | Section 1

Description
Mental health experts believe that globally, even before COVID-19, more than one billion people had a diagnosable mental disorder. The numbers and intensity have only increased in the years since the onset of the pandemic, and yet the biases and misconceptions surrounding mental illness, not to mention the dehumanization and abuse in many communities of individuals with a mental illness, remains acute. This course uses literature and the arts to help students learn more about some of the prevalent biases, misconceptions, myths, and stigmas against individuals with mental illness and how these biases could be (and in the past have been) ameliorated.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. This course counts for the Aesthetics and Culture Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1144. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

Jay M. Harris PhD, Harry Austryn Wolfson Professor of Jewish Studies, Harvard University

HUMA S-136
Advice to Young Leaders

David R. Armitage PhD, Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35456 | Section 1

Description
This reading and discussion seminar focuses on texts in the western tradition written for young people in their teens and early twenties. From ancient Rome to modern America, political thinkers, philosophers, poets, and prose writers have addressed advice to rising generations planning to enter public service or take up other positions of leadership and influence. We read these traditions of advice with an eye to the past, the present, and the future: that is, in their own terms and for what they say to us today. Students learn to think rigorously about their own responsibilities, as citizens and as leaders, with the help of Cicero, Seneca, Niccol Machiavelli, Desiderius Erasmus, William James, Max Weber, Virginia Woolf, and Maya Angelou.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. This course is a Summer Seminar. Learn more about Summer Seminars on this page. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

HUMA S-185
Global Gender Justice

Karen Thornber PhD, Harry Tuchman Levin Professor in Literature, Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35401 | Section 1

Description
With gender inequities and biases pervasive within and across cultures worldwide, and the global pandemics of gender-based violence and structural violence further intensified by responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, how have individuals, groups, communities, and nations globally fought for (and against) gender justice? How have struggles against gender injustice intersected and conflicted with struggles against racial, ethnic, environmental, health, LGBTQIA+, and other forms of injustice? Gender justice, as is true of justice more broadly, is often discussed in the abstract or as a matter of law, political history, protest movements, enfranchisement, and similar phenomena. Yet at its core, justice involves individuals and their experiences both their suffering and their triumphs most directly accessed through stories. In this course we explore a range of stories and different forms of storytelling on gender justice, from novels and films to memoirs and personal histories, histories, and creative nonfiction. Some narratives with which we engage are Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Ito Shiori’s Black Box: The Memoir that Sparked Japan’s #MeToo Movement, Audre Lorde’s The Cancer Journals, Cynthia Enloe’s The Big Push: Exposing and Challenging the Persistence of Patriarchy, and Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzald a’s This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. Students are also encouraged to write their own stories on gender and justice.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

ISMT S-599
Capstone Seminar in Digital Enterprise

Zoya Kinstler PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33285 | Section 1

Description
This interactive, fast-paced seminar focuses on digital technologies as tools for achieving business goals. A digital enterprise is defined as an organization whose business model and operating platform are driven by information technology (IT). Through readings and case studies, we learn how companies transform their processes and systems by implementing digital technologies: cloud services, mobile and social platforms, data analytics, and machine-to-machine communications. Then we roll up our sleeves and build a capstone project, architecting an IT solution for a realistic business scenario. Concepts covered include enterprise architecture, software systems, business processes, service orientation, system integration, and project implementation framework. Our seminar offers an intense learning experience via engaging lectures, case studies, demanding research and reading requirements, and stimulating teamwork.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted degree candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), information management systems. Prospective candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing and have successfully completed all seven specific degree requirements and at least two electives with required grades. Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Science Center 110
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

Francesco Erspamer Laurea, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

ITAL S-Aa
Beginning Italian

Antonio Di Sanzo PhD, Instructor, Melrose High School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33401 | Section 1

Description
Intended and designed for students with little, if any formal knowledge of Italian, this course enables beginning students to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Italian in a cultural context. Activities include listening comprehension, grammar exercises, conversation, and role-playing, with a strong emphasis on oral communication.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-2:00pm, Science Center B09A

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

JAPA S-120
Intermediate Japanese

Naomi Asakura MA, Preceptor in Japanese, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33130 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for students with a solid background in basic grammar, equivalent to one year of college study. Students are expected to have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills as well as reading and writing ability in hiragana, katakana and approximately 180 kanji in context. The course covers the second half of Genki 2 and some authentic materials. The goal is the simultaneous progression of four skills speaking, listening, reading, and writing enabling students to advance beyond beginning-level Japanese, further develop conversation strategies to improve daily communication, and become familiar with aspects of Japanese culture necessary for language competency.

Prerequisites: JAPA S-Bab or the equivalent of one year of college-level Japanese. Students must pass a placement test given the first day of class.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-12:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

JAPA S-Bab
Elementary Japanese I, II

Maiko Nakatani BA, Language Instructor in Japanese, Harvard University

Yuki Sakomura MA, Language Instructor in Japanese, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32813 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for people with little or no background in Japanese. We cover lessons 1-12 of the Genki 1 textbook and lessons 13-16 of Genki 2. This fast-track introductory course aims to develop a basic foundation in the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course introduces basic sentence patterns, vocabulary, and common expressions, which allow students to speak and write about themselves, topics of personal relevance, and some aspects of Japanese culture. After this course, students have survival-level communication skills to communicate solely in Japanese in everyday situations of daily life. This course also introduces the hiragana, katakana, and about 209 kanji (Chinese characters).

Prerequisites: It is recommended that students study both Japanese hiragana and katakana prior to beginning the course. Since this is a summer-term course, it is faster-paced than the equivalent semester-long course, so it helps to get an advance start.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-12:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

JAPA S-C
Basic Japanese

Mihoko Yagi EdM, Preceptor in Japanese, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32880 | Section 1

Description
This course is for people with little or no background in Japanese. The course aims to develop a basic foundation in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course also introduces the Japanese writing systems, hiragana, katakana, and approximately 60 kanji (Chinese characters). Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students have survival-level communication skills in common daily life situations in Japanese.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-100
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Journalism

Chastity M. Pratt BA, Education Bureau Chief, The Wall Street Journal

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35046 | Section 1

Description
This graduate proseminar introduces students to the fundamentals of journalism at the graduate level research, interviewing, reporting, and writing by exposing them to a variety of reporting assignments. Students learn how to construct a lead as well as how to structure a story. They experience the difference between a feature story and a news story by having to write them both.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-140a
News Reporting and Writing

Amanda Becker MA, Correspondent, 19th News and Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34896 | Section 1

Description
This course prepares students to handle breaking news events across a variety of platforms. They learn to get out the highlights of an event whether it’s a press conference about an unfolding natural disaster, a major political speech, or the passage of major legislation and then pivot to updating and building out to create the main story of the day. The course stresses accuracy, fact-checking, and fairness. We debate and discuss industry themes such as objectivity, viewpoints, and inclusivity.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-150
Advanced Narrative Nonfiction: The Investigative Essay

Daniel Fenster MA, Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35560 | Section 1

Description
This course is intended for experienced writers and readers of nonfiction who, having a firm grasp of the many modes this unwieldy genre can take, wish to drill down on the investigative essay. Sometimes called literary journalism, sometimes documentary literature, this type of writing often incorporates memoir and biography, journalism and reportage, criticism, philosophy, and history, making use of the investigative methods of scholars and journalists to deeply probe a question or set of questions, sometimes finding an answer, sometimes simply understanding the contours of the questions more deeply. From its debatable origins in the (ostensible) fiction of Herman Melville through its twentieth-century development by writers including James Agee, Joseph Mitchell, James Baldwin, and Svetlana Alexievich, to contemporary innovations in work by Kiese Laymon, Leslie Jamison, and John Jeremiah Sullivan, we explore what makes this writing feel so alive. Along the way, discussions cover topics including character and portraiture, inclusion and omission, investigation and invention, observation, interviewing for narrative, and suspense and withholding. Readings and discussions are guided, in part, by students’ interests, but may also include George Orwell, Janet Malcolm, Donovan Hohn, Eula Biss, Tom Bissell, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Thomas Chatterton Williams.

Prerequisites: Introductory journalism class or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-161
Podcasting

Ruth Tam BA, Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35093 | Section 1

Description
Once considered a new and fringe medium, podcasting is now a well-established field that shapes cultural conversations. But as the podcast field has grown, so have expectations around it. What makes a riveting audio story today? What skills are necessary for putting one together? In this course, students learn how to identify storytelling components in podcasts (story structure, pace, and characterization) and are introduced to the skills required for podcast production (interviewing, recording, and mixing). Students should enroll with an idea of a story they would like to tell in audio form; over the course of the summer session, they turn their ideas into an episode or the beginning of a series. Together, we practice the art of careful listening and individually we hone our personal storytelling style. We also discuss journalistic ethics, branding, and the sustainability of the podcast field at large. Shows we discuss include Slow Burn, The Trojan Horse Affair, Anything For Selena, Through The Cracks, 9/12, Reply All, and Canary.

Prerequisites: An introductory journalism course, some journalism experience, or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-190
Writing for Public Radio

Alexander Smith BA, Nieman Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35621 | Section 1

Description
Public radio stories have been called the haiku of news reporting. The genre forces journalists to distill complex ideas into tight narratives in order to meet time constraints and appeal to broad audiences. Producing radio requires even professional print reporters to think differently about storytelling and can help anyone to be a more deft and impactful writer. Public radio also has its own quirky language and practices for use of sound which can seem daunting to a newcomer. Students dissect good radio stories to see what makes them tick, workshop attention-grabbing introductions, study the chemistry between narration and sound, and produce radio stories of their own. This course provides would-be radio reporters with the tools they need to pitch pieces and work with local and national editors.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-50
Basic Journalism in the Digital Age

Austin B. Bogues MA, Assistant Washington Editor, USA Today

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32314 | Section 1

Description
In a time when journalism and truth-finding are under siege, this writing-intensive course provides a deep understanding of reporting, writing, and ethics. Students learn how to recognize good stories, gather facts through in-person interviews, develop sources, and write news, feature, and opinion articles that inform and engage readers. Students workshop their stories in class to further develop reporting, writing, and rewriting skills.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Harvard Hall 103

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

JOUR S-599
Journalism Capstone Project

June Carolyn Erlick MSJ, Publications Director, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, and Editor-in-Chief, ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33945 | Section 1

Description
The capstone is the culmination of the student’s work in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), journalism program and consists of a series of substantial stories completed in one semester. The capstone generally consists of three to five related pieces, text or multimedia based, in different styles. Text-based projects are generally about 5,000 words; the parameters of projects in other media are determined by the student and the project director together and are based on the requirements of the story. Past capstone directors have included Boston Globe editors and reporters, former fellows from the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, and other professionals in the field.

Prerequisites: Students must be officially admitted candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), journalism. Prospective degree candidates and students with pending admission applications are not eligible. Candidates must be in good academic standing with a minimum of 36 degree-applicable credits completed with required grades. Candidates submit capstone proposals by March 1. Proposals require revisions and must be approved by the capstone advisor by April 1. Candidates who do not meet these degree requirements or do not have their capstone proposals approved by the deadline are dropped from the course. See the journalism capstone website for proposal details and approval deadlines.

Class Meetings:
Online

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Hi-Sun Helen Kim PhD, Director of the Korean Language Program and Senior Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Ahsil Noh MA, Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Hi-Sun Helen Kim PhD, Director of the Korean Language Program and Senior Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

LATI S-53
Latin Love Elegy

Miriam Leah Kamil PhD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Hamilton College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35637 | Section 1

Description
Students acquire knowledge of the themes and conventions of the important genre of Latin elegy by reading select poems of Catullus, Ovid, Propertius, Tibullus, and Sulpicia. The focus is on Latin reading proficiency while we also investigate the social, political, and literary context of the late Republic and early Empire.

Prerequisites: A minimum of one intermediate-level college Latin course or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

LATI S-Aa
Beginning Latin

Allison Resnick AM, Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Justin S. Miller MA, Doctoral Candidate in Department of the Classics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35169 | Section 1

Description
This beginning Latin course is designed for those who have had no previous instruction in classical Latin. The course covers the equivalent of one semester of college-level Latin and focuses on the acquisition of fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course, students are able to read, with the help of a dictionary, short continuous passages from such authors as Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid. Students who successfully complete the course are equipped to enter into the equivalent of a second-semester sequence of college-level Latin in the following fall semester.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking introductory Greek or Latin, or CLAS S-97a. See the department’s website for more information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

LATI S-Aab
Intensive Beginning Latin

Jorge Alejandro Wong II AM, Doctoral Candidate in the Classics, Harvard University

Emily Mitchell AM, Doctoral Candidate in Classical Philology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31870 | Section 1

Description
This intensive beginning Latin course is designed for those who have had little or no previous instruction in classical Latin and are highly motivated to make accelerated progress in the language. The course covers the equivalent of the first two semesters of college-level Latin. It focuses on the acquisition of fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary so that by the end of the course students should be able to read, with the help of a dictionary, continuous passages from such authors writing in classical Latin as Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid. Those who successfully complete this course should be equipped to enter into the equivalent of a second-year sequence of college-level Latin in the following fall semester.

Prerequisites: Previous experience of language learning (whether ancient or modern languages) is not required, but may be helpful.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 10:00am-12:00pm, Boylston Hall 203
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 1:00pm-3:00pm, Boylston Hall 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. Harvard University’s Classics department is offering two scholarships for high school or college students taking introductory Greek or Latin, or CLAS S-97a. See the department’s website for more information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

LING S-101
The Science of Language: An Introduction

Deniz Satik MA, Doctoral Candidate in Linguistics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35108 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to the study of linguistics as a science. It introduces several components of grammar (morphology, syntax, phonology, phonetics, and semantics) and surveys methods, findings, and theories of linguistic research on the sound system and the structures of human language.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Boylston Hall 104
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

LING S-120
Introduction to Historical Linguistics

Jeremy Rau PhD, Professor of Linguistics and of the Classics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35518 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to historical linguistics, the study of language change over time. It covers the fundamental aspects of language change (semantic, phonological, morphological, and syntactic), as well as the techniques and procedures involved in investigating these changes. Students study the comparative method, learn how to demonstrate or refute genetic relationships between languages, and try their hand at reconstruction of prehistoric phases of languages. The course further addresses the issues of long-range comparisons, externally (socially) and internally (structurally) motivated language change, and language contact. More culturally oriented topics, such as evolution of writing, decipherment of forgotten writing systems, and language and prehistory (linguistic paleontology) are likewise explored.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

LSTU S-121
Global Law, Global History: A Comparative Perspective

Liliana Obregon PhD, Professor of Law and Director of the LLM in International Law, University of Los Andes Law School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35371 | Section 1

Description
In this course, students discuss texts and videos on normative views of global history from the colonization of the Americas to the end of the cold war. In the process, they develop insight into the relation between the disciplines of law and history. This course allows students to discuss a variety of perspectives on state-building, nationalism, revolutions, empire, religion, and their relation to our contemporary world. This course also questions concepts such as civilization and progress and their impact in the history of global order. By introducing questions, themes, and approaches to the study of global law and history, this course provides a conceptual toolbox that may further students’ interest in international relations, political science, international law, or global studies. Students may not count both HIST S-1022 (offered previously) and LSTU S-121 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 6:30pm-9:30pm, CGIS Knafel K050
Friday, June 23, 6:30pm-9:30pm, CGIS Knafel K050

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

LSTU S-124
The History of Law in Europe

Tamar Herzog PhD, Monroe Gutman Professor of Latin American History, Harvard University and Affiliated Faculty Member, Harvard Law School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35155 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the history of law in Europe (including both England and the continent, as well as Europe’s overseas domains) from the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century to the present day European Union. During the course, we observe how European legal systems changed over time and what legacies they left in the present. We read and discuss historical texts that highlight the particularities of distinct moments, as well as debate some of the main dilemmas facing European law today.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

LSTU S-131
Start-ups from the Perspective of Business and IP Law

Tiffany Nichols PhD, JD, Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of History, Princeton University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34451 | Section 1

Description
This course covers the intersection between start-ups, entrepreneurship, and intellectual property (IP) law. Students gain skills with navigation of major tenets of intellectual property law including patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets as these concepts relate to start-ups and entrepreneurship. Students also gain experience in presenting shark tank and more formal pitches which incorporate references to the IP holdings of start-ups or small businesses. Further, students receive an introduction to the basics of contract instruments which allow for sharing of IP with entities outside of a start-up while protecting the IP of the start-up. Lastly, students are exposed to the IP litigation landscape which start-ups face using actual litigation matters. For example, students are provided with an overview of discovery and gain deposition skills through a hands-on approach. Upon completing the course, students are able to perform basic legal research, understand basic case law, and interpret basic legal documents, such as patent applications and simple confidentiality agreements, which are relevant to start-ups during their funding and growth periods.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

LSTU S-133
Global Digital Law and Politics

Roxana Vatanparast PhD, Fellow, Transatlantic Technology Law Forum, Stanford Law School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35571 | Section 1

Description
This course aims to provide students with an overview of issues relating to the relationships between digital technologies, politics, and law. It also introduces students to theoretical frameworks for examining the mutually interactive relationships between technology, law, and social order, where technology is both an object and source of governance. The course covers contemporary issues such as cyberlaw, digital infrastructures, surveillance, platforms and informational capitalism, datafication, privacy, data protection, the role of platforms in the governance of online speech, intermediary liability, blockchain, financial technologies, and the relationship between technology and inequality.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

MATH S-101
Spaces, Mappings, and Mathematical Structures, with an Introduction to Proof

Allechar Serrano Lopez PhD, Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35145 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to abstract mathematical thought and proof techniques, via topics including set theory, group theory, analysis, and topology.

Prerequisites: An interest in mathematical reasoning. Acquaintance with algebra, geometry, and/or calculus is desirable. Placement test recommended.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 9:30am-11:30am, Science Center B-10
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MATH S-156
Mathematical Statistics

Dmitry V. Kurochkin PhD, Senior Research Analyst, Faculty of Arts and Sciences Office for Faculty Affairs, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35553 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to mathematical statistics and data analysis. It starts by introducing central concepts of probability theory (events, probability measure, random variables, distributions, joint distributions, and conditional distributions) and then moves on to the development of mathematical foundations of statistical inference. Topics covered in the course include random variables, expectations, parameter estimation (method of moments, method of maximum likelihood, and Bayesian approach), properties of point estimators (bias, variance, consistency, and efficiency), confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, likelihood ratio test, data summary methods, and introduction to linear regression. A class of distributions, including chi-squared, t, and F distributions, the distributions derived from normal that occur in many applications of hypothesis testing and statistical inference, are introduced.

Prerequisites: MATH S-1a or equivalent. No prior knowledge of probability is assumed. Students are required to take a short pretest at the beginning of the course. The pretest score does not count toward the final grade but helps students understand whether their background in calculus positions them for success in this course.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day.

Syllabus

MATH S-1a
Calculus I

Carolyn Gardner-Thomas PhD, Director, Mathematics for Teaching Program, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30391 | Section 1

Description
This course covers differential and integral calculus in one variable, with applications. We aim to develop conceptual understanding, computational skills, and the students’ ability to apply the material to science. The topics covered overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. A graphing calculator can occasionally be useful. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of algebra, functions, logarithms, trigonometry, and analytic geometry as demonstrated by the placement test. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School’s mathematics for teaching program.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 9:30am-11:30am
Required sections to be arranged. Required seminar for graduate-credit students to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

MATH S-1b
Calculus II

Amadeus Martin PhD, Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30393 | Section 1

Description
Galileo wrote that “the book of the universe is written in the language of mathematics.” Speaking the language of modern mathematics requires fluency with the topics of this course: infinite series, integration, and differential equations. The course aims to balance applications and theoretical understanding. The topics covered are not identical to those of a BC advanced placement class, but do overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of first semester calculus including the trigonometric functions, logarithmic functions and differentiation, and an acquaintance with integration, or satisfactory score on the math placement test required. Graphing calculators with the capability of computing (approximating) definite integrals are required. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Science Center B-10
Optional sections to be arranged. Required seminar for graduate-credit students to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 60 students

Syllabus

MATH S-1b
Calculus II

Hakim J. Walker PhD, Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Shanelle Davis AB, Teaching Assistant in Mathematics, Harvard University

Katherine Leigh Penner AB, Undergraduate Science Research Advisor, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35491 | Section 2

Description
Galileo wrote that “the book of the universe is written in the language of mathematics.” Speaking the language of modern mathematics requires fluency with the topics of this course: infinite series, integration, and differential equations. The course aims to balance applications and theoretical understanding. Graphing calculators can help with understanding certain concepts and are recommended, but exams do not require them. The topics covered are not identical to those of a BC advanced placement class, but do overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent.

Prerequisites: This section is restricted to students in the Emerging Scholars Program in Harvard College. A good working knowledge of first semester calculus including the trigonometric functions, logarithmic functions, and differentiation, and an acquaintance with integration required. Graphing calculators with the capability of computing (approximating) definite integrals are required.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Science Center 110

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

MATH S-21a
Multivariable Calculus

Oliver Knill PhD, Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30189 | Section 1

Description
To see how calculus applies in situations described by more than one variable, we study vectors, lines, planes, and parameterization of curves and surfaces; partial derivatives, directional derivatives, and gradients; optimization and critical point analysis, including the method of Lagrange multipliers; integration over curves, surfaces, and solid regions using Cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; vector fields, and line and surface integrals for work and flux; and the divergence and curl of vector fields together with applications.

Prerequisites: Two semesters of calculus. Placement test recommended.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center E
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

MATH S-21b
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Robert Winters PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30190 | Section 1

Description
Matrices provide the algebraic structure for solving myriad problems across the sciences. We study matrices and solutions to systems of linear equations as part of understanding linear transformations and general linear spaces. Using the notions of orthogonality, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, we find least-squares solutions, solve discrete and continuous dynamical systems using exact methods and phase-plane analysis, introduce the Spectral Theorem and Fourier series, and analyze different types of differential equations.

Prerequisites: MATH S-1B. Knowledge of partial derivatives is helpful. Placement test recommended.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 9:30am-11:30am, Harvard Hall 101
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: On-campus meetings are recorded. A live stream is available at the time the class meets. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. See minimum technology requirements. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

MATH S-3
Quantitative Reasoning: Practical Math

Graeme D. Bird PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34186 | Section 1

Description
This course reviews basic arithmetical procedures and their use in everyday mathematics. It also includes an introduction to basic statistics covering such topics as the interpretation of numerical data, graph reading, hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression. No previous knowledge of these tools is assumed. Recommendations for calculators are made during the first class.

Prerequisites: A willingness to (re)discover math, appreciate its practical uses, and enjoy its patterns and beauty. Placement test recommended.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Harvard Hall 101
Friday, June 23, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Harvard Hall 101
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,000.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

MATH S-325
Extreme Graph Theory and Combinatorics

John W. Cain PhD, Senior Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34499 | Section 1

Description
How large must a gathering of people be in order to ensure that either six of the people mutually know one another or that six of the people are mutual strangers? How many rooks (or knights or bishops) can be placed on a standard chessboard such that no two of them are attacking one another? Are there optimal, fair experimental designs by which we may mutually compare thirteen competing brands of fabric softener without having to directly compare all seventy-eight possible pairs of brands? These problems are examples of extremal problems in combinatorics and graph theory, a sub-discipline of mathematics that involves a very different way of thinking relative to areas such as algebra, geometry, and calculus. In this course, we explore some classical extremal (and fun) problems including the ones mentioned above. The methods we develop are applicable to a variety of important practical problems, such as optimal scheduling of flights. Topics are drawn from the following areas: Ramsey theory (classical Ramsey numbers, van der Waerden numbers, and the happy end problem), two-player positional games (tic-tac-toe and the Hales-Jewett theorem, generalized maker-breaker games), and optimal combinatorial designs (balanced incomplete block designs, Steiner triple systems, difference sets, finite projective planes).

Prerequisites: A solid foundation in algebra and geometry, and some exposure to the concept of mathematical proof. Prior exposure to calculus is not required.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MATH S-328
Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

Michael Nathanson PhD, Lecturer on Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35370 | Section 1

Description
According to Galileo, “Mathematics is the language with which God has written the universe.” In this course, we learn how to use the language of mathematics to model aspects of the world to seek insights that might otherwise be hidden. We model physical processes, human behavior, money and markets, and much else. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of all three major modeling tasks: simulation, prediction, and optimization. Our focus is on translating questions into mathematical language; learning techniques to build models and extract information from them; deciding which technique is most appropriate to our problem; and then interpreting the results of our calculations in terms of the original question. We also look at the impact of models on equity and inclusion and the danger in applying incomplete models.

Prerequisites: MATH S-1a or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MATH S-329
Appraising and Reimagining Middle and High School Mathematics Education

Robin Gottlieb MSc, Professor of the Practice in the Teaching of Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35389 | Section 1

Description
This course examines critical issues in middle and high school mathematics education in the United States from a variety of perspectives. Questions addressed include: what are the goals of mathematics education at the middle and high school level? Why does math education in middle school and high school matter? What societal structures (historic, economic, political, and cultural) impact mathematics education and how does math education impact those structures in turn? As the world changes, in what way do the goals of mathematics education change? Given goals and what we know about learning, how can we improve practice in the classroom? We sharpen the lens through which we view math education in the US by looking at some international case studies, as well as case studies from different classrooms in the US. This is a discussion-based course. Students are expected not only to be active participants in discussions but also to take a lead in conducting discussions.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center 111
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

MATH S-332
Mathematical Reasoning: An Introduction to Reading and Writing Proofs

Reshma Menon PhD, Preceptor in Mathematics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35146 | Section 1

Description
Ever wonder where a mathematical fact comes from or why you should believe it? What does it mean to prove a theorem, and how do people discover or create these proofs? In this course, we see how proofs are build from the basic tools of logic; along the way, we gain a better understanding of mathematical structure. The course follows a discovery approach in which students create mathematical results together via inquiry based learning while focusing on making conjectures and analyzing mathematical arguments.

Prerequisites: A solid foundation in precalculus.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

MATH S-Ar
Precalculus Mathematics

Srdjan Divac MA, Lecturer on Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30388 | Section 1

Description
In this course, a systematic study of the standard families of functions is combined with some basics of discrete mathematics and number theory. This course provides an excellent preparation for calculus and introductory science courses, as well as an exposure to genuine problem solving. The course is taught in small sections. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Prerequisites: A good working knowledge of algebra, as demonstrated by a satisfactory score on the math placement test. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:45am-11:45am, Science Center 309A
Friday, June 23, 8:45am-11:45am, Science Center 309A
Required seminar for graduate-credit students to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes:

Syllabus

MBB S-102
Becoming a Brain Scientist: Neuroscience and Psychology Research

Garth Coombs PhD, Preceptor in Psychology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33663 | Section 1

Description
How do scientists study the brain, behavior, cognition, and learning? This course is an introduction to how psychologists and neuroscientists formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and collect and analyze data to learn about nervous system and brain functioning, brain disorders and disease, learning, and behavior. Each student is matched with a research mentor in a Harvard laboratory. Students spend approximately ten hours per week on a project related to the lab’s research. In addition, all students meet weekly as a group to explore topics of interest to researchers in biological science, neuroscience, and psychology, including research ethics and human subjects’ protection, clinical trials, and science communication. Students read both literature specific to their lab experience as well as more general material on research methods and experimental design. Host laboratories conduct research in a wide variety of areas, which may include neuroscience, cognition, brain disorders and disease, mental disorders, and animal behavior.

Prerequisites: Students must have completed their junior year in high school. Students must submit a petition (maximum 3,000 characters) to enroll when adding this course to their cart. This petition will serve as a statement of interest, explaining the student’s relevant experience and reasons for wanting to take this courses. Students also need to upload a transcript via MyDCE (choose Document Uploader and MBB S-102 Transcript Upload) before their application can be considered. Students should submit all materials by March 30 for the best chance of admission to the course. Applications are reviewed by lab personnel and the instructor. Once a decision had been made on the application, students will see in their carts whether the petition has been approved or denied. Please contact brainscience@summer.harvard.edu if you have questions about this course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, June 20-August 4, 1:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-10
HBS CORe: Business Analytics, Economics for Managers, and Financial Accounting

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33543 | Section 1

Description
CORe stands for Credential of Readiness and is offered through Harvard Business School (HBS) Online. CORe is a primer on the fundamentals of business and is designed for students just getting started in the business world. Developed and taught by Harvard Business School faculty, this course covers business analytics, economics for managers, and financial accounting. The business analytics portion is taught by Janice Hammond and introduces quantitative methods used to analyze data and make better management decisions. The economics for managers portion is taught by Bharat Anand and includes the topics of customer demand, supplier cost, markets and competition, pricing, production, and differentiation. The financial accounting portion is taught by V.G. Narayanan and covers concepts such as profit and revenue, and assets and liabilities, and how to prepare and analyze financial statements. All learning materials and instructor and participant interaction take place within the HBS Online learning environment. Although the professors do not have direct real-time interaction with students, they have developed short video lectures, cases, exercises, and other interactive learning elements to create a highly engaging educational experience. Participants typically learn as much (if not more) from thoughtful participation and from peers in this active learning ecosystem as they do from faculty content. For more information see HBS Online’s CORe.

Prerequisites: To register for this course, students must apply to and be admitted by HBS Online for the May cohort. Apply now. If accepted, registration transactions must all be done on the HBS Online website. For more information, contact hbsonlinesupport@hbs.edu. After registering with HBS Online, students receiving financial aid or any other type of financial assistance (for example, consortium agreements) should contact the Summer School Student Financial Services office at studentfinance@extension.harvard.edu.

Class Meetings:
Online

Term Start Date: May 23, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,960.

Credits: 8

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

This course is graded pass/fail with grades of high honors, honors, pass, or fail. Extension of time (EXT) grades are not available. Harvard University’s Tuition Assistance Plan (TAP) cannot be used. Certain other scholarships and waivers are also excluded. Students registered for MGMT S-10 are considered full time and may not take other Harvard Summer School courses, are not eligible for on-campus housing, and are not eligible for health insurance. Admission, registration, refund, make-up exam, and grading policies are determined by the HBS Online CORe administration and have precedence over corresponding Harvard Summer School policies.

  • Start date: May 23
  • Last day to apply: May 15
  • Last day to register: May 18
  • Last day to drop for 100% tuition refund, minus the HBS Online $100 enrollment fee: May 24

MGMT S-2000
Principles of Finance

Bruce D. Watson MA, Master Lecturer on Economics, Boston University and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32611 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an introductory survey of the field of finance. It examines the agents, instruments, and institutions that make up the financial system of the modern economy, such as bonds, the stock market, derivatives, and the money market. Along the way, standard concepts and tools of financial analysis are introduced: present discounted value, option value, and the efficient markets hypothesis. Recent developments in the field in particular, the application of psychology to financial markets (called behavioral finance) are also discussed. The course is designed to equip students with the tools they need to make their own financial decisions with greater skill and confidence. Specifically, we see how insights from academic finance can inform and improve students’ own investing decisions.

Prerequisites: High school algebra.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $1,980, graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-2000.

Syllabus

MGMT S-2035
Principles of Real Estate

Teo Nicolais AB, MS, President, Nicolais, LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33385 | Section 1

Description
This course offers practical, real-world knowledge for investing in real estate. It’s designed both for those pursuing an active career in the industry as well as individuals interested in building wealth through passive real estate holdings. Students learn what really drives land values, and explore how market forces shape their city and where to look for future growth. Students practice spotting investment opportunities in the lifecycles of properties, neighborhoods, and cities. They study the four phases of the eighteen-year cycle which shape the real estate investment landscape. In the second half of the course, students receive hands-on training building financial models, analyzing cash flows, and measuring investment returns. Finally, they learn how entrepreneurs raise capital through debt and equity partnerships and explore strategies for successful investing. No prior real estate background is required.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

MGMT S-2037
Real Estate Finance and Investment

Teo Nicolais AB, MS, President, Nicolais, LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33506 | Section 1

Description
This course presents a toolkit for maximizing investment returns. Students closely examine the four sources of real estate returns (cash flow, appreciation, loan amortization, and tax advantages), which have an impact on their investment strategy. They develop an investment scorecard for scrutinizing new investment opportunities, and practice a rigorous, rational approach to deciding when to hold, sell, refinance, or renovate a property. They study strategies for raising capital from investors and work through examples of successful partnership structures. Finally, students learn how to efficiently manage a growing portfolio of cash-flowing assets.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2035 is strongly recommended but not required.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

MGMT S-2600
Financial Statement Analysis

James F. White MS, Assistant Vice President for Finance and Controller, Berklee College of Music

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32615 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed to prepare students to interpret and analyze financial statements for tasks such as credit and security analyses, lending and investment decisions, and other decisions that rely on financial data. This course explores in greater depth financial reporting from the perspective of financial statement users. Students develop a sufficient understanding of the concepts and recording procedures and therefore are able to interpret various disclosures in an informed manner. Students learn how to compare companies financially, understand cash flow, and grasp basic profitability issues and risk analysis concepts. Students apply analytical tools and concepts in competitor analysis, credit and investment decisions, and business valuation. Ultimately students who complete this course develop a more efficient and effective approach to researching, interpreting, and analyzing financial statements.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-1000 and MGMT S-2000 or the equivalent required; MGMT S-1600 and MGMT S-2020 helpful.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 205

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 80 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-2620
Business Analysis and Valuation

Ned Gandevani MBA, PhD, Senior Portfolio Manager, Moloney Securities, RBC Capital

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33335 | Section 1

Description
Financial statements are important sources of insight as to the financial health, prospects, and value of a company. But just how accurate are these reports? Is management’s view trustworthy or biased? What are the warnings? This course introduces a framework for the analysis of financial statements and financial plans, with particular focus on their usefulness in valuing and financing companies and evaluating corporate and management performance.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900. MGMT S-2020 or MGMT S-2700 are helpful but not required.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-2700
Corporate Finance

Ned Gandevani MBA, PhD, Senior Portfolio Manager, Moloney Securities, RBC Capital

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33795 | Section 2

Description
The goal of this course is to develop skills for making corporate investment decisions and for analyzing risk. Topics include discounted cash flow and other valuation techniques; risk and return; capital asset pricing model; corporate capital structure and financial policy; capital budgeting; mergers and acquisitions; and investment and financing decisions in the international context, including exchange rate/interest rate risk analysis.

Prerequisites: ECON S-1900, MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

MGMT S-2725
Global M A Design: Digital Business Model Innovation and Cross-Border Deals

C. Bulent Aybar PhD, Professor of International Finance, Southern New Hampshire University

Thorsten Feix PhD, Professor of Mergers and Acquisitions, Augsburg University of Applied Sciences

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34428 | Section 1

Description
In rapidly evolving markets and industries with patterns of digital disruption, business model innovation, and global value chain strategies are paramount to increasing shareholder value and propelling growth. Business strategies have to be sensitive to their specific ecosystem and should be tailor-made. Mergers and acquisitions (M As) are a specific approach to leverage growth and value by redesigning corporate portfolios or by creating a competitive advantage at the business unit level. The dark side of these strategies is that they have significant risk profiles, and they tend to underdeliver on promised synergies and may seriously diminish shareholder value. This course focuses on the strategic and technical challenges of M A process in the international context and offers a rich toolbox for prospective analysts and managers.

Prerequisites: ECON S-190, MGMT S-2020, or MGMT S-2700 or equivalent courses in finance.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Harvard Hall 201
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-2784
Hedge Funds: History, Strategies, and Practice

Peter Marber PhD, Chief Investment Officer for Emerging Markets, Aperture Investors, and Adjunct Instructor, Finance, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35162 | Section 1

Description
While beating the markets was long thought to be impossible, hedge funds have seemingly challenged many financial theories, cracked the mysteries of Wall Street, and made fortunes in the process. They are also one of the fastest growing and least understood areas in the asset management industry. What exactly are hedge funds? How has the sector developed? What do hedge fund managers strive to capture and how do they do it? What are the major hedge fund strategies and their mechanics? What are their hidden risks and unique limitations? How important are hedge funds to investors, regulators, and the public? From both a theoretical and practical perspective, this course is geared to help answer these questions. It surveys the hedge fund industry from its origins in the 1940s, and explores hedge fund strategies including long/short, event-driven, market neutral, relative value, dedicated short-bias, convertible arbitrage, emerging markets, fixed income arbitrage, global macro, managed futures, and multi-sector investing. Students develop an understanding of how hedge fund managers as well as hedge fund investors think, operate, and invest. The course tracks a live multi-sector hedge fund portfolio throughout the semester and analyzes current events and price action.

Prerequisites: The course requires a basic knowledge of finance and modest competency in Excel. Prior coursework or work experience in finance would also be useful.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. This course has an optional, concurrent on-campus active learning weekend, MGMT S-2784w. In a noncredit format, you can extend your learning on the topic while engaging with peers and faculty on the Harvard University campus. If you successfully participate in the entire weekend, MGMT S-2784 and MGMT S-2784w fulfill four credits of on-campus course work for the Bachelor of Liberal Arts (ALB) or Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), management or finance degrees. For Harvard University TAP eligible employees, please note that the optional on-campus active learning weekend component is considered a separate course and will be counted as such for the purposes of TAP limits and fees.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-2784w
Hedge Funds: Active Learning Weekend

Peter Marber PhD, Chief Investment Officer for Emerging Markets, Aperture Investors, and Adjunct Instructor, Finance, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35618 | Section 1

Description
What exactly are hedge funds? How has the sector developed? What do hedge fund managers strive to capture and how do they do it? What are the major hedge fund strategies and their mechanics? This active learning weekend complement to MGMT S-2784 helps students develop an understanding of how hedge fund managers, as well as hedge fund investors, think, operate, and invest. The weekend features a variety of guest speakers, case studies, and other activities to further enhance concepts introduced in MGMT S-2784.

Prerequisites: Students must be concurrently enrolled in MGMT S-2784.

Class Meetings:
Active Learning Weekend
Friday, July 14, 5:30pm-8:30pm, One Brattle Square 201
Saturday, July 15, 9:00am-5:00pm, One Brattle Square 201
Sunday, July 16, 9:00am-1:00pm, One Brattle Square 201

Term Start Date: July 14, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit credit $750.

Credits: 0

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students must be present for the entire three-day weekend to earn residency credit for MGMT S-2784. Tuition does not include hotel accommodations, transportation, or meals. See Visiting Campus and Finding Housing for information about visiting Cambridge. International Students see important visa information. For Harvard University TAP eligible employees, please note that this optional on-campus active learning weekend component is considered a separate course and will be counted as such for the purposes of TAP limits and fees.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

MGMT S-2790
Private Equity

Viney Sawhney MS, President, Boston National Capital Partners

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33375 | Section 1

Description
This course is the study of private equity money invested in companies that are not publicly traded on a stock exchange or invested in as part of buyouts of publicly traded companies. The main objective of the course is to provide students with the necessary theoretical and conceptual tools used in private equity deals. The course provides the intellectual framework used in the private equity process, valuation in private equity settings, creating term sheets, the process of due diligence, and deal structuring. Other learning objectives include building an understanding of harvesting through initial public offerings or mergers and acquisitions, public-private partnerships, and sovereign wealth funds. The final objective of this course is to show how corporate governance, ethics, and legal considerations factor into private equity deals.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2000, MGMT S-2700, or an introductory accounting course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-2795
Venture Capital

Viney Sawhney MS, President, Boston National Capital Partners

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34120 | Section 1

Description
This course focuses on the venture capital cycle and typical venture-backed start-up companies. It covers the venture fund structure and related venture capital objectives and investment strategies, intellectual property, and common organizational issues encountered in the formation of start-ups. It covers matters relating to initial capitalization and early stage equity incentive and compensation arrangements, valuation methodologies, challenges of fundraising, due diligence, financing strategies, and harvesting. Students critically examine investment terms found in term sheets and the dynamics of negotiations between the owners and the venture capitalist. The course examines the role of venture capitalists in providing value addition during the growth phase for portfolio companies. Alternate financing channels that include incubators, accelerators, crowd-funding, angels, and super-angels are studied in depth. The system of rules, practices, and processes by which start-ups are directed and controlled and the typical dynamics that play out between the venture capitalist and the entrepreneur are an integral part of this course.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Mindy Payne MBA, Part-Time Faculty in Management and Organization, Boston College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34609 | Section 1

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Paul Green DBA, Assistant Professor of Management, McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34231 | Section 2

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference with Required On-Campus Weekend
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Saturday, Sunday, June 24-25, 9:00am-5:00pm, One Brattle Square 204

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Along with the web-conference meetings, this course also includes an intensive—and mandatory—weekend residency. Students must be present for the entire on-campus weekend session to earn credit for the course. The course begins via web conference during the first week of the term and continues to meet throughout the term. Please see the syllabus for the specific course meeting dates. Tuition does not include hotel accommodations, transportation, or meals for the on-campus weekend session. International Students see important visa information. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Carmine P. Gibaldi EdD, Professor of Management and Organizational Psychology, St. John’s University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33055 | Section 3

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4000
Organizational Behavior

Edward Barrows DBA, Managing Director, Duke Corporate Education

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34944 | Section 4

Description
This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 37 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4122
Influence and Power in Organizations

Edward Barrows DBA, Managing Director, Duke Corporate Education

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35550 | Section 1

Description
In a world of flattening organizations and expanding networks, success accrues to those who understand how to influence effectively and use power to their advantage. Unfortunately, very few know what influence and power are or how to build skills in these areas. In this course, students learn how to use influence and power as tools for understanding environments, crafting agendas, and reaching personal goals. The course is designed to uncover individual views and feelings about influence and power and develop practical perspectives and approaches to overcome problems and capitalize on opportunities. Through lecture, case discussions, and weekly application assignments, students learn how to grow influence and power in their own organizations.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 38 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4150
Leadership

John Paul Rollert PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor of Behavioral Science, The University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33824 | Section 1

Description
How do you become a leader? How do you maintain a successful claim to leadership? This course aims to answer these questions with lessons drawn from history, literature, politics, and business. The course is highly interactive, and students are expected to discuss and debate the qualities of strong leadership and followership in class and online. Throughout the course, we welcome guest speakers from business, government, politics, and the Harvard faculty to talk about their perspectives on leadership.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Northwest Science Building B103
Friday, June 23, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Northwest Science Building B103
Required sections Wednesdays, 4-5 pm.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

MGMT S-4185
Leadership Perspectives

John F. Korn PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34531 | Section 1

Description
This course explores various models of leadership that have been developed from both a theoretical and practical perspective. The learning objectives of this course are primarily twofold: First, students gain an understanding of the major leadership theories. For each model studied, students are expected to understand the theoretical basis of the model, the strengths and weaknesses of said model, and how to apply the model to practical situations in business and other settings. Second, students explore their personal leadership style through a series of written assignments and classroom activities. These activities enable the student to reflect on how they view leadership as both a subordinate and as a leader. As a result of enrolling in this class, students develop a well-rounded understanding of leadership concepts for use in their own leadership opportunities. Students may not count both GOVT E-1354 and MGMT S-4185 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 8:30am-11:30am, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4225
Negotiation and Organizational Conflict Resolution

Nicholas Coburn-Palo PhD, Preceptor in Public Speaking, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35171 | Section 1

Description
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concept and types of negotiation. It is designed for students who wish to manage individual and organizational conflict and negotiations more effectively based on the premise that those in management positions engage in some form of negotiation daily. Students discuss the meaning, types, and different strategies of negotiation with an emphasis on an integrative, collaborative, win-win negotiation approach. A variety of topics are discussed including, but not limited to, workplace conflict, strategies for diagnosing, emotional elements in approaching negotiation and conflict resolution, psychological subprocesses, social contexts, individual and cultural differences, multiparty situations, and dealing with impasses. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students engage in topic driven discussions, deep case study analysis, mediation training, and a capstone simulation exercise. The course emphasizes the significance of leadership in approaching and managing a negotiation situation and organizational conflict resolution.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Friday, June 23, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 36 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4310
Creativity and Innovation

Michael Grandinetti MBA, Adjunct Professor, School of Engineering, Brown University and Industry Fellow, College of Engineering, Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology, University of California Berkeley

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35348 | Section 1

Description
Creativity is not just for artists. In fact, it is a fundamental requirement for success regardless of functional role, place in the organizational hierarchy, or industry sector. In the world of business, creativity manifests as innovation. According to a recent survey of 1,500 C-level executives by IBM, creativity is the number one leadership competency required to effectively navigate our increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) world. Given this, creativity has become as important as literacy. Whether operating in the corporate, startup, social entrepreneurship, not-for-profit, or public sectors, organizations increasingly need people who understand the creative process; know how to manage, motivate, and engage creative professionals; and can develop an organizational culture that encourages experimentation, considers the inevitable failures as learning opportunities, and enables innovative outcomes. This course focuses on best practices in creativity and innovation, exploring the interplay between creativity, organizational processes and systems, and successful innovation. Throughout the course we explore tools and techniques for fostering individual and group creativity, management practices that foster (or inhibit) innovation, methods for developing and evaluating ideas for new products and services, the business models to execute these ideas, and principles and practices for leading innovation. Using a variety of readings, case examples, discussions, experiential exercises, and a team project, students explore and apply the principles of creativity and innovation.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. This course has an optional, concurrent on-campus active learning weekend, MGMT S-4310w. In a noncredit format, you can extend your learning on the topic while engaging with peers and faculty on the Harvard University campus. If you successfully participate in the entire weekend, MGMT S-4310 and MGMT S-4310w fulfill four credits of on-campus course work for the Bachelor of Liberal Arts (ALB) or Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), management or industrial-organizational psychology degrees. For Harvard University TAP eligible employees, please note that the optional on-campus active learning weekend component is considered a separate course and will be counted as such for the purposes of TAP limits and fees.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 36 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4310w
Creativity and Innovation: Active Learning Weekend

Michael Grandinetti MBA, Adjunct Professor, School of Engineering, Brown University and Industry Fellow, College of Engineering, Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology, University of California Berkeley

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35617 | Section 1

Description
Creativity is not just for artists. In fact, it is a fundamental requirement for success regardless of functional role, place in the organizational hierarchy, or industry sector. In the world of business, creativity manifests as innovation. According to a recent survey of 1,500 C-level executives by IBM, creativity is the number one leadership competency required to effectively navigate our increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) world. Given this, creativity has become as important as literacy. Whether operating in the corporate, startup, social entrepreneurship, not-for-profit, or public sectors, organizations increasingly need people who understand the creative process; know how to manage, motivate, and engage creative professionals; and can develop an organizational culture that encourages experimentation, considers the inevitable failures as learning opportunities, and enables innovative outcomes. This on-campus weekend course focuses on best practices in creativity and innovation, exploring the interplay between creativity, organizational processes and systems, and successful innovation. Throughout the hands-on intensive weekend, we use a few highly effective tools and methodologies for fostering individual and group creativity, including a serious games exercise and non-coding hackathon practices that foster innovation; methods for developing and evaluating ideas for new products and services, and the business models to execute these ideas; and principles and practices for leading innovation. Using a variety of readings, discussions, experiential exercises, and a challenging team project, students explore and apply the principles of creativity and innovation. We also tour a state of the art maker space.

Prerequisites: Students must be concurrently enrolled in MGMT S-4310 in order to enroll in this course.

Class Meetings:
Active Learning Weekend
Friday, July 21, 5:30pm-8:30pm, One Brattle Square 203
Saturday, July 22, 9:00am-5:00pm, One Brattle Square 203
Sunday, July 23, 9:00am-1:00pm, One Brattle Square 203

Term Start Date: July 21, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit credit $750.

Credits: 0

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students must be present for the entire three-day weekend to earn residency credit for MGMT S-4310. Tuition does not include hotel accommodations, transportation, or meals. See Visiting Campus and Finding Housing for information about visiting Cambridge. International Students see important visa information. For Harvard University TAP eligible employees, please note that this optional on-campus active learning weekend component is considered a separate course and will be counted as such for the purposes of TAP limits and fees.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 36 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-4500
Work and Well-Being

Jeff Steiner PhD, Doctoral Candidate, Organizational Behavior, Harvard Business School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35551 | Section 1

Description
This course draws from multiple disciplines to examine the complex relationship between human labor and human flourishing. Topics include the history and evolution of work; the future of work; the measurement of well-being at work and in life; the modern employee engagement crisis; similarities and differences across countries and work contexts; the role of individuals, managers, organizations, and policy-makers in improving well-being outcomes; and the role of individuals in managing their own work and careers in pursuit of the good life.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Shawn O’Connor MBA, JD, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Mazzy Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34242 | Section 1

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Kenneth Baylor DBA, Principal, Advanced Leadership Solutions, LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33845 | Section 2

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Mohsin Habib PhD, Associate Professor of Management, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32578 | Section 3

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 202
Friday, June 23, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 202

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5000
Strategic Management

Joshua Brand MBA, Senior Director of Corporate Learning, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35151 | Section 4

Description
To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses, and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic, and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries.

Prerequisites: Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 201

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5015
Applied Corporate Responsibility

Charles Bradford Allen PhD, Professor of Marketing, School of Business, Plymouth State University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32870 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the role of corporate responsibility as a strategy to improve products, profits, and brand equity. The idea of corporations as simply wealth-creating organizations with no obligations to the environment is no longer acceptable. Globalization and increased transparency of corporate operations have revealed significant variations in how organizations attempt to balance the pursuit of profits and good corporate citizenship. Expectations for measurable progress of corporate environmental programs addressing natural resources, pollution controls, monitoring ethical supply chains, and expanded training of employees are growing globally. Stakeholder expectations have accelerated the need to monetize these initiatives. However, the lack of standardized methodology and metrics has resulted in confusion within many industries, hindering progress. Tracking sustainability progress within organizations has often revealed tremendous opportunities for growth.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 201
Friday, June 23, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5027
Emerging Markets in the Global Economy

Mohsin Habib PhD, Associate Professor of Management, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34435 | Section 1

Description
This course examines emerging countries in the global economy. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and income, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. Many emerging countries lack the necessary resources, capacities, and institutions to manage globalization effectively. In this course, students study the institutions in emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors, such as the government and the NGOs; analyze market opportunities and risks; and examine the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5030
Project Management

Deb Cote MA, Senior Director, Strategic Planning and Performance, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Mass General Brigham

David A. Shore PhD, Adjunct Professor of Organizational Development, Business School, University of Monterrey, Mexico

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35181 | Section 1

Description
This course guides students through the fundamental project management concepts, practices, and behavioral characteristics needed to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and nonprofit organizations. Effective project managers possess the skills necessary to manage teams, schedules, risks, budgets, scope, and stakeholders to produce a desired outcome. Students analyze the impact of organizational change management theory and explore project management with a practical, hands-on approach through case studies, team assignments, and individual contributions. A key and often overlooked challenge for project managers is the ability to manage without direct influence, gaining the support of stakeholders and access to resources not directly under their control. Special attention is given to critical success factors required to overcoming resistance to change. The course simulates a project in its project team framework, group accountability, and schedule deadlines.

Prerequisites: Experience working in a company or nonprofit is advisable.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Harvard Hall 202

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5030
Project Management

Timothy Mills MS, Member, Board of Directors, 3HO Foundation and Project Management Consultant

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35652 | Section 2

Description
This course guides students through the fundamental project management concepts, practices, and behavioral characteristics needed to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and nonprofit organizations. Effective project managers possess the skills necessary to manage teams, schedules, risks, budgets, scope, and stakeholders to produce a desired outcome. Students analyze the impact of organizational change management theory and explore project management with a practical, hands-on approach through case studies, team assignments, and individual contributions. A key and often overlooked challenge for project managers is the ability to manage without direct influence, gaining the support of stakeholders and access to resources not directly under their control. Special attention is given to critical success factors required to overcoming resistance to change. The course simulates a project in its project team framework, group accountability, and schedule deadlines.

Prerequisites: Experience working in a company or nonprofit is advisable.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5033
Supply Chain Management

Zal Phiroz PhD, President, Pier Consulting Group

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33018 | Section 1

Description
From corporate giants to small businesses, the optimization of supply chain techniques and operations practices plays a critical factor in establishing a competitive advantage. This course introduces the concept of supply chain management and identifies industry innovation, methods of cost reduction, and operations optimization techniques. In addition to hosting industry leading guest speakers, the course follows a case study approach to identify the relationship between domestic and foreign goods supply and logistical efficiency, while examining a number of areas including strategic positioning, environmental factors, and effective supply chain growth and development.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5042
Agile Project Management

Shannon Pettiford MS, IT Program Manager, Boston Consulting Group

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35552 | Section 1

Description
Change is the new norm, and global organizations must adapt to dynamic and varied environments and challenges. A thorough review of agile techniques and methodologies helps address such concerns, providing the skills, knowledge, and techniques to ensure projects deliver benefit realization, deliver on time, and improve team efficiency. In this course, students learn to differentiate between agile and waterfall project management methodologies, exploring when each is most beneficial to use and assessing how the agile methodology is leveraged to address stakeholders’ changing requirements. Students learn project management skills and best practices to lead agile project teams and provide effective delivery solutions. Agile project management practices and principles are discussed in detail, including self-organizing teams, project management roles, adaptive planning, value-driven delivery, stakeholder engagement, problem detection and resolution, print execution, and retrospective analysis. Current trends and best practices are also explored, using case studies to discover best practices and techniques in the field. In team settings, students use the scrum approach to understand better what executing an agile methodology of a project feels like. Regardless of project management experience, this course is designed to bring agile principles to life by practicing the skills and facilitation techniques in a team-based environment.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5100
Essentials of Management

Carmine P. Gibaldi EdD, Professor of Management and Organizational Psychology, St. John’s University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34434 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces the important aspects of managing a business in a global environment. It addresses decision making in connection with communications, marketing, human relations, managing people, corporate social responsibility, and managerial ethics, as well as issues affecting efficiency, and it provides the framework for making sound decisions among competing strategic priorities and objectives. Students weigh the risks and rewards of different types of management decisions while acquiring varied business skills.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5330
Principles and Practices of Fundraising

Frank White MPhil, Communications Consultant

Jon Schaffrath MBA, Director of Development Strategic Initiatives, Harvard Business School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33374 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed for current or aspiring managers, professional staff, and volunteers in the nonprofit sector who want to become familiar with the fundamentals of philanthropy and fundraising. Topics include an overview of philanthropy and its importance in today’s interconnected world; characteristics of nonprofit organizations and their differing fundraising needs and systems; motivations for giving; ethical concerns; prospect research; types of funding sources; capital campaigns; grant proposal writing; solicitation techniques; and internet fundraising. The frameworks that we cover are applicable to different missions, sizes, and types of nonprofit organizations. Please note that this course consists in large part of a simulation in which students join a team representing a fictional or real nonprofit organization and work to prepare a final presentation for potential donors, played primarily by the instructor and teaching assistants. The course is meant to have students experience, as realistically as possible, what it is like to work in a fundraising environment.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-540
Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Michael Grandinetti MBA, Adjunct Professor, School of Engineering, Brown University and Industry Fellow, College of Engineering, Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology, University of California Berkeley

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35157 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed to teach fundamental principles and best practices and methodologies for creating and scaling a successful, high-impact entrepreneurial venture. The course is highly experiential and action-based. Human-centric design and highly iterative lean/agile methodologies serve as cornerstones for this course. Students are grouped into teams around common interests and the venture creation process is walked through step by step, culminating in a pitch to angel investors and venture capitalists.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-5460
Next Generation Business Models: Creating the Next Airbnb

Edward Ladd PhD, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Hult International Business School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33906 | Section 1

Description
Why is Airbnb more valuable than most hotel chains even though it is only a few years old and does not own any real estate? Despite its size and growth, why did Uber fail in China? In this course, we explore new ways of creating and capturing value using cutting-edge technologies. These business models can connect people, helping them share goods and services. They can collect massive amounts of information to improve customer value at different points in the sales cycle. They can generate revenue from nontraditional sources. They can leverage Web3 technologies like blockchain and smart contracts. And they can fail. In the course, we discuss a wide range of theories and tools within contemporary internet economics, strategy, and entrepreneurship, including business opportunities with Web3. Students form teams to develop an idea for a new venture that leverages these theories. Together, we analyze and build the next generation of world-changing business models.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference with Required On-Campus Weekend
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Friday, July 7, 5:30pm-8:30pm, One Brattle Square 203
Saturday, July 8, 9:00am-5:00pm, One Brattle Square 203
Sunday, July 9, 9:00am-1:00pm, One Brattle Square 203

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Along with the web-conference meetings, this course also includes an intensive—and mandatory—weekend residency. Students must be present for the entire on-campus weekend session to earn credit for the course. The course begins via web conference during the first week of the term and continues to meet throughout the term. Please see the syllabus for the specific course meeting dates. Tuition does not include hotel accommodations, transportation, or meals for the on-campus weekend session. International Students see important visa information. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-599
Capstone: Entrepreneurship in Action

Henrik Totterman DSc, Professor of Practice, Entrepreneurship and Management, Hult International Business School and Chief Executive Officer, Lead X3M, LLC

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34791 | Section 1

Description
This course is intended as the capstone course for the Harvard Extension School’s Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), management, integrating coursework in functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, human resource management, and operations management. It introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses involving the basic direction and goals of a real-world challenge, organization, or capstone client; the social, political, technological, economic, and global environment; the industry and market structure; and the organization’s strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms.

Prerequisites: This course is only for officially admitted capstone track candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM), management. Candidates must be in good academic standing and have successfully completed the seven core degree-applicable courses and the precapstone course, MGMT E-597, in the previous Harvard Extension School spring term with a grade of B- or higher. Registration in the Harvard Summer School course, MGMT S-599, immediately following the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-597 is a mandatory degree requirement. Candidates who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am, Harvard Hall 201
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am, Harvard Hall 201

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 30 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-6000
Marketing Management

Susan Hughes-Isley PhD, Associate Professor of Speech Communication/Journalism, Perimeter College, Georgia State University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34220 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to managing the marketing activities of an organization: marketing information systems and research, the marketing organizational system, and the marketing planning and control system. Topics include customer and client analysis, market research, product and service planning, pricing, communications, advertising and sales promotion, distribution management, and the development of strategies. The use of marketing concepts and tools by nonprofit organizations is also discussed.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-6000
Marketing Management

Shawn O’Connor MBA, JD, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Mazzy Health

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34570 | Section 2

Description
This course is an introduction to managing the marketing activities of an organization: marketing information systems and research, the marketing organizational system, and the marketing planning and control system. Topics include customer and client analysis, market research, product and service planning, pricing, communications, advertising and sales promotion, distribution management, and the development of strategies. The use of marketing concepts and tools by nonprofit organizations is also discussed.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-6040
International Marketing

Nicholas Nugent, Sr. PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32581 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the development of international marketing programs, from the determination of organizational objectives and methods through the execution of research, advertising, distribution, and production activities. Students examine the international similarities and differences in marketing functions in relation to the cultural, economic, political, social, and physical dimensions of the environment. Students also consider the changes in marketing systems and the adoption of marketing philosophies and practices to fit conditions in different countries.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-6630
Sustainability Marketing

Thomas Murphy MBA, Associate Professor of Practice, Graduate School of Management, Clark University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33345 | Section 1

Description
This course develops the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully market sustainable products and services. At the end of the course students are able to understand the key elements of developing a successful marketing strategy and branding approach for a sustainable market offering. The course also reviews global trends and issues that influence sustainable product success.

Prerequisites: Introductory marketing or management course or one year of work experience in a business-to-business, business-to-consumer, or nonprofit organization.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MGMT S-6655
Social Media Management

Jemalyn A. Griffin MA, Assistant Professor of Practice, Advertising and Public Relations, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33507 | Section 1

Description
This course offers an in-depth exploration of social media theories and management practices. Students start with understanding prominent theories applied in social media practice and then apply these theories in conducting social media research, executing a social media content analysis, and developing a strategic social media management plan for a real-world organization. They have the opportunity to scrutinize a wide variety of social media tactics, paying particular attention to the unique managerial functions of each. More importantly, students learn the mechanism of social influence and how social media trends are changing the way information flows in our society so that they can comfortably use and effectively leverage emerging social media in the future. In this course, students are able to apply social media management skills and knowledge of social media channels to conduct a social media analysis. In addition, students discuss the use of social media in crises, gain an understanding of setting social media policy, and review ethical and privacy issues surrounding social media marketing. Due to the ever evolving nature of social media, real-time case studies, current trends, and relevant articles are integrated throughout the course and in some cases, supplement or change course assignments.

Prerequisites: MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 35 students

Syllabus

MUSE S-100
Introduction to Museum Studies

Katherine Burton Jones MA, Director, Museum Studies, Harvard Extension School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33278 | Section 1

Description
This course provides a behind-the-scenes view of museums from the people who are actively involved in their operations. Students learn about the history and objectives of various types of museums (art, natural history, science, historical, zoological) through panel discussions that involve museum directors, curators, conservators, collection managers, and exhibit designers. The focus is the rich and diverse resources of Harvard University’s museums, but there are also guest lecturers from other local museums. The course is required for students planning to apply to the Harvard Extension School’s graduate program in museum studies, but is also appropriate for the avid museum-goer who desires a more comprehensive understanding of how museums function.

Class Meetings:
Online

Optional sections Thursdays, time to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. The recorded lectures are from the fall 2022 Harvard Extension School course MUSE E-100.

Syllabus

MUSE S-102
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Research in Museum Studies

Jeffrey Robert Wilson PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33935 | Section 1

Description
In this interdisciplinary proseminar students develop the writing skills necessary to produce a successful graduate-level research project on a topic relevant to the field of museum studies. During the first half of the course, students read classic scholarly texts in museum studies and complete short assignments designed to hone their use of core elements of academic writing: summary, analysis, argument, counterargument, evidence. During the second half, students write a 10-page research essay that reflects their particular areas of interest within the field of museum studies. In this survey course we study the theory that informs museum practice. In particular, we examine how museums can powerfully mediate encounters with the collective past and reflect the politics of race, class, and gender as well as individual, communal, and national identities. We analyze how museums create meaning and invite interpretation. Furthermore, students draw upon the resources of their local museums as well as Harvard University’s own museums to see how they create what James Clifford has called “contact zones” between specialists (such as artists, researchers, scientists, and scholars) and the general public.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course, EXPO S-42a. MUSE S-100 is also recommended.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

MUSE S-117
Museum Collections Care

Sara M. Frankel MA, Collections Manager for the David P. Wheatland Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34211 | Section 1

Description
This course offers a hands-on training experience in collections care, documentation, and processing at the Harvard Collections of Historical Scientific Instruments. Students work directly with collections management and curatorial staff members on a collections-based project. Students are assigned to two sections of the project and rotate between stations assignments throughout the course. Students work directly with museum staff for the entire course and are trained by a conservator in the techniques we use. Activities include training in object handling and object processing, working with the collections database, and use of scanners as needed. Also, students are shown how their projects fit into the larger picture of museum collections care and documentation. They leave with a brief (35 hours) but thorough understanding of their specific project and basic collection care.

Prerequisites: MUSE S-100 recommended.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center 252
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am, Science Center 252

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 8 students

Syllabus

MUSE S-132
Environmental Sustainability and Climate Action in Museums

Jerry Foust PhD

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33582 | Section 1

Description
Seen as some of the most trusted institutions in American public life, museums are uniquely positioned to facilitate public discussion of the environment and climate change within their communities. There is also an opportunity to protect and strengthen these institutions. Surveying the evolution of sustainability in museums over the last fifteen years, this course examines the practical aspects of collections care, interpretation and public programming, operational changes, building construction, and community engagement to examine how changes in museum work can deepen museums’ connections to their communities and increase their charitable value. Students discuss and share ideas frequently in class, developing graded projects with feedback from classmates and the instructor. Topics include human behavior (the challenge of change, whether in daily practice or major projects, and how museums are so well-suited to support staff, visitors, and communities in making change); mitigation (why and how museums and communities are reducing their negative effects on the environment and what difference can it make to the environment, the climate, and to social and financial stability); and resilience (why and how museums are creatively helping their communities become more environmentally, financially, and socially adaptable in the face of a changing climate and increased impacts from weather events; how museums can share with the public the scientific and social discoveries enabling widespread change).

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

MUSI S-10
Fundamentals of Music

Andrew M. Friedman PhD, Tutor, Signet Education

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32243 | Section 1

Description
An intensive introduction to basic music theory and musicianship, covering notation, keys, rhythm, meter, intervals, counterpoint, melody, chords, harmonic progressions, and small forms. Assignments include workbook exercises, music analysis, composition, ear training, and sight singing. Repertoire includes classical, jazz, blues, pop, rock, funk, indie, and various world musics. No previous knowledge required.

Prerequisites: Students should have access to a keyboard, piano, or a midi keyboard with at least 49 keys. See course syllabus for details.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Music Building PH9

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

MUSI S-190r
Technomusicology

Wayne G. Marshall PhD, Assistant Professor of Music History, Berklee College of Music

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33876 | Section 1

Description
In this course we make audio and video art that examines the interplay between music and technology since the dawn of sound reproduction and especially in the digital age. Embracing new technologies ourselves, we use the popular, powerful music software Ableton Live to explore new techniques and idioms for storytelling by composing a series of etudes, or studies, in particular media forms. These etudes can accommodate novice experimentation or virtuoso programming while offering shared conceptual ground to all. Students develop a familiarity with the history of sound media while cultivating competencies in audio and video editing, sampling and arranging, mixing and remixing, as well as in critical listening, writing, and discussion.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHIL S-109
Buddhist Philosophy

Parimal G. Patil PhD, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35522 | Section 1

Description
Indian Buddhism has inspired philosophers for almost 2500 years. Yet, relative to Euro-American philosophy, Buddhist philosophy has received little attention. In this course, we explore the rich traditions of Indian Buddhist philosophy. More specifically, we discuss topics in Buddhist epistemology, ethics, metaphysics, philosophy of action, and philosophy of mind. We pay particular attention to the arguments that Buddhist philosophers used to defend their views and respond to their critics. In addition to understanding these arguments in their historical contexts, we ask what we can learn from them today and, when relevant, investigate how they are being used in contemporary philosophy.

Prerequisites: Previous coursework in philosophy would be helpful.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, 1 Story Street 304
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHIL S-12
Deductive Logic

James Pearson PhD, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Bridgewater State University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33526 | Section 1

Description
Logic is the study of valid argumentation. A valid argument is one whose conclusion is implied by its premises. By learning to paraphrase English arguments in a formal symbolic language, we clarify this relationship between premises and conclusion, and refine our ability to distinguish good reasoning from bad reasoning. Students in this course learn how to analyze argumentative structure, construct counter-examples, and formally deduce one statement from another. It is expected that students work in groups on weekly problem sets. These problem sets are designed to challenge students’ communication and critical thinking skills.

Prerequisites: None, but some background in mathematics is encouraged.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, 1 Story Street 302
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHIL S-159
Biotechnology and the Human Good

Timothy Furlan PhD, Burnett Family Distinguished Chair in Ethics, University of St. Thomas, Director, Center for Ethical Leadership, and Senior Editor, Pediatric Ethicscope

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34553 | Section 1

Description
Biotechnology offers exciting and promising prospects for healing the sick and relieving suffering. But exactly because of their impressive powers to alter the workings of body and mind, the dual uses of the same technologies make them attractive also to people who are not sick but who would use them to look younger, perform better, feel happier, or become more perfect. These applications of biotechnology are already presenting us with some unfamiliar and very difficult challenges. In this course, we consider such possible beyond therapy uses, and explore both their scientific basis and the ethical and social issues they are likely to raise. We consider how pursuing the goals of better children, superior performance, ageless bodies, or happy souls might be aided or hindered, elevated or degraded, by seeking them through a wide variety of technological means. Among the biotechnological techniques considered are techniques for screening genes and testing embryos, choosing sex of children, modifying the behavior of children, augmenting muscle size and strength, enhancing athletic performance, slowing senescence, blunting painful memories, brightening mood, and altering basic temperaments. Toward the end of the course, we begin to ask what kinds of human beings and what sort of society we might be creating in the coming age of biotechnology.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHIL S-164
Facing Evil and Suffering in the Modern World

David C. Lamberth PhD, Professor of Philosophy and Theology, Harvard Divinity School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33659 | Section 1

Description
We frequently look upon the modern world and characterize it in naturalistic and secular terms. But at the extremities of human behavior and human suffering, whether individual or social, we find ourselves calling people, groups, and situations evil. What do we mean by this? What is the difference between something being evil, or just wrong? What typifies actions we deem evil and what should we do about them? What does our appeal to evil say about our sense of humanity, religion, God? This course takes up these questions through a variety of lenses drawn from Western thought: religious, philosophical, theological, and ethical. Readings include Jewish and Christian scriptures (Genesis, Job, Paul), classic theologians and philosophers (Augustine, Leibniz, Kant), novelists (Dostoevsky, Dillard), and contemporary critics (Nieman, Arendt, Gouri). The last portion of the course turns from ideas to situations, looking at cases such as the Eichmann trial, the use of evil in contemporary American political discourse, our location relative to nature, and a parent’s reaction to the murder of a child to query our contemporary thinking about evil and suffering.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Robinson Hall 105
Friday, June 23, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Robinson Hall 105

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

PHIL S-167
Introduction to Biomedical Ethics

Eli Hirsch PhD, Charles Goldman Professor of Philosophy, Brandeis University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30201 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of ethics and applies them to some of the most widely discussed issues of the day. Students examine ethical issues that arise in a biomedical context, such as euthanasia, eugenics, reproductive control, lying to patients, and the right to health care.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHIL S-18
Human Ethics: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Seth Robertson PhD, Lecturer on Philosophy, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35011 | Section 1

Description
Does might make right? Should a person focus on achieving immortality or on living a simple, happy, mortal life? Is morality simply a matter of convention? Why be moral when being immoral could provide access to wealth, fame, and power? What do people owe a society that has failed in its obligations to its people? How can we identify and resist oppression, marginalization, and injustice? Human beings have been thinking about and debating questions like these for thousands of years. This course explores the history of ethics and moral philosophy from a genuinely inclusive perspective by focusing on ethical thought from all over the world, with special emphasis on marginalized groups that have typically received little attention in academic philosophy.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, Northwest Science Building B108
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHYS S-12
Introduction to Digital Fabrication

Eric N. Melenbrink MDes, Postdoctoral Fellow in Materials Science and Mechanical Engineering, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34524 | Section 1

Description
This course is a hands-on introduction to rapid prototyping, integrating physics, engineering, design, computer science, and art. Students learn to safely use software and hardware to fabricate programmable projects in a collaborative environment. Tools and topics include shop safety, hand tools, laser cutter, 3D printer, computer-controlled milling, electronic circuit design, programmable microcontrollers, molding, and casting. Applications include personal fabrication, product prototyping, fine arts, and creation of scientific research tools. Biweekly class meetings consist of a discussion of the previous assignment, a short lecture on the next topic, and a hands-on training session for the accompanying assignment. The course culminates with an individual final project, integrating as many of the topics as possible. In addition to class meetings there are supervised help sessions to work on assignments. Each student documents work on each biweekly topic in a personal website, thereby finishing the course with an online portfolio that not only illustrates their new skill sets, but also contributes to a collective repository of knowledge. Although no fabrication expertise is required, the open-ended nature of the course would make it valuable for students with any amount of prior experience.

Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy (word processing, online search skills) is expected.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Science Center 102
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

PHYS S-1a
Principles of Physics: Mechanics

Andrew Burkhardt PhD, Assistant Professor of Physics, Worcester State University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33182 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to Newtonian mechanics. Topics include Newton’s laws, kinematics, statics, conservation of energy and momentum, the simple harmonic oscillator, and rotations. This course fulfills one of two semesters of physics for entrance to medical school. May be taken concurrently with PHYS S-1b.

Prerequisites: This course presumes that students have taken precalculus and are comfortable with trigonometry and algebra. Exposure to the concepts of mechanics is helpful.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Science Center A
Required labs and sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PHYS S-1b
Principles of Physics: Electromagnetism, Circuits, Waves, and Ray Optics

Gregorio Ponti PhD, Preceptor in Physics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33183 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to electromagnetism, wave optics, and ray optics. Topics covered include electrostatics, circuits, magnetism, diffraction, interference, and image formation via reflection and refraction. This course has a laboratory component and fulfills one of two semesters of physics for entrance to medical school. It may be taken concurrently with PHYS S-1a.

Prerequisites: Strong knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is required. This is not a calculus-based course; familiarity with differential calculus is helpful but not necessary. Background in mechanics at the level of PHYS S-1a is also helpful but not necessary.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Science Center A
Required labs and sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PORT S-Aa
Beginning Portuguese

Jaqueline Ristau PhD, Teaching Assistant in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35582 | Section 1

Description
This elementary course provides an introduction to Brazilian Portuguese. Intended for those with no prior experience in the language, this course emphasizes interpersonal communication as well as the interpretation and production of written and spoken language. Students take their first steps on the journey from speaking English to carrying conversations with Portuguese speakers, thanks to immersion activities and dynamic, interactive learning. Students experience contextualized Luso-Afro-Brazilian culture through music, film, and social media.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-2:00pm, Boylston Hall 103

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

PSYC S-1
Introduction to Psychology

Elizabeth Phelps PhD, Pershing Square Professor of Neuroscience, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30204 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of psychology and the results of classic studies and current research in the major areas of this discipline: physiological psychology, learning and motivation, sensation and perception, cognition, emotion, development, social psychology, personality, and clinical psychology. Students gain an understanding of major issues addressed in psychological research today, including the complex interactions between nature and nurture and the neural bases of human behavior.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, William James Hall B1
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PSYC S-1072
The Psychology of Emotional, Behavioral, and Motivational Self-Regulation

Richard J. McNally PhD, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33216 | Section 1

Description
This course covers cutting-edge research on how people acquire self-regulatory skills to bolster their willpower, enabling them to achieve personal, academic, and professional goals. Topics include acquiring expertise, combating procrastination, increasing desirable habits, and overcoming smoking, overeating, and emotional problems.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, William James Hall 401

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1072
The Psychology of Emotional, Behavioral, and Motivational Self-Regulation

Richard J. McNally PhD, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33432 | Section 2

Description
This course covers cutting-edge research on how people acquire self-regulatory skills to bolster their willpower, enabling them to achieve personal, academic, and professional goals. Topics include acquiring expertise, combating procrastination, increasing desirable habits, and overcoming smoking, overeating, and emotional problems.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, William James Hall 401

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1240
Psychopathology

Shelley H. Carson PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33784 | Section 1

Description
This course is an introduction to the study of psychopathology. It focuses on theoretical models of abnormal behavior as they relate to the definition, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. Diagnostic classification, and behavioral and biological features of the major syndromes of psychopathology are emphasized.

Prerequisites: PSYC S-1 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PSYC S-1410
Introduction to Psychopharmacology

Steven Raymond Boomhower PhD, Senior Toxicologist, Gradient

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34864 | Section 1

Description
Human interaction with drugs permeates our society. Alcohol, cigarettes and electronic cigarettes, heroin, and marijuana all of these chemicals act on the brain and alter an individual’s behavior. Psychopharmacology and behavioral pharmacology is the study of drugs’ effects on behavior and is a growing, interdisciplinary field in psychology. This course is designed as an introduction to the methods of psychopharmacology, both in humans and nonhumans. We survey a wide variety of drug classes, select drugs, basic concepts in pharmacology, behavioral methodology, clinical applications, and drug effects on the nervous system. This course is meant to emphasize both historical and classical studies in the field of psychopharmacology as well as topical developments relevant to present-day issues related to drugs, addiction, and human behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC S-1, or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PSYC S-1415
Dopamine

Simon Barak Caine PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35567 | Section 1

Description
A Parkinson’s victim regains control of her body with l-dopa. A schizophrenic man paralyzed by fear and hallucinations is freed from a mental institution by clozapine. A meth addict lies, cheats, and steals, ending up emaciated and dead. Miracles and monstrosities, all related to a single molecule dopamine. The overall goal of this seminar is to focus on a single subject, a single chemical neurotransmitter, and remain on that topic to proceed through three phases of study, as follows. First, to orient students to tools from multiple traditional disciplines: synaptic mechanisms of neurotransmission, neuropharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, neuroanatomy, and psychiatry. Second, to elicit interest and curiosity through examples of specific and important disease states: Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Third, to gain an historical perspective by reading review articles of recent years. The main discipline presented in this course is pharmacology, specifically, in vivo pharmacology and more specifically, behavioral pharmacology in humans. Pharmacology has played and continues to play a key role in the history of neuroscience, in many applications of clinical medicine, and in the relationships among mind, brain, and behavior.

Prerequisites: No science background is necessary; however, an inclination for scientific material, and prior introductory coursework in neurobiology, neurosciences, physiological psychology, medical sciences, systems physiology, or biology would be helpful.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1440
Sleep and Mental Health

Edward Franz Pace-Schott PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34537 | Section 1

Description
The scientific study of sleep is an area of research that is both highly diverse and among the most interdisciplinary and unifying of topics in psychology and neuroscience. In the past several decades, exciting new discoveries on the neurobiology of sleep have been facilitated by technologies such as functional neuroimaging and molecular genetics. Nonetheless, sleep remains mysterious and controversial and, remarkably, there still is no generally agreed upon function for this behavioral state that occupies one third of our lives. Importantly, sleep science exemplifies the translational approach in biomedical science whereby human and animal research together continually advance the field of sleep medicine. Following an overview on the physiology and behavioral neuroscience of sleep, students choose a topic related to the effects of sleep on mental health to research in depth, to present to the class, and to discuss in a term paper. Topics might include the characteristic abnormalities in sleep occurring in mood, anxiety, psychotic, addictive, autism spectrum, or neurodegenerative disorders. Such changes are increasingly seen as bidirectional, with sleep disturbances contributing to the waking symptoms of these mental disorders. Other topics might focus on the contribution of primary sleep disorders to psychiatric and neurological illness such as the linkage between sleep apnea and depression, circadian rhythm disorders in bipolar illness, insomnia as a risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders, or contribution of nocturnal seizures to neurodevelopmental disorders. Still other topics may focus on the contribution of normal sleep to emotional regulation, memory consolidation, and human performance factors. For those with more neuroscientific interests, topics might include neuroimaging of cognitive functioning following sleep deprivation or the growing interest in trafficking and disposal of abnormal proteins during sleep having a potential role in neurodegenerative illness.

Prerequisites: PSYC S-1 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1470
The Psychology of Eating

Adam J. Wenzel PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology, St. Anselm College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34534 | Section 1

Description
This course explores the manifold physiological, nutritional, behavioral, and sociocultural factors mediating why we eat, what we eat, and how we eat. Topics covered in the course include sensory systems and eating experience, biological mechanisms of hunger and satiety, social influence over food consumption, stress and comfort foods, eating and health, and maladaptive eating behaviors. Section meetings provide opportunities for in-depth discussion of contemporary material as well as participation in individual and group projects.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1503
The Psychology of Close Relationships

Holly Parker PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34497 | Section 1

Description
This course is an exploration of the psychology of close human relationships. We learn about intimate (romantic) relationships and friendships, and the ways in which these two kinds of relationships interact. Other kinds of close relationships (family and work relationships, for example) are integrated into the course, and although they are extremely valuable relationships in their own right, they are addressed secondarily to romantic relationships and friendships for the purposes of this course. Examples of topics include the biological bases of attraction and love, relationship formation and dissolution, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (the influence of others). Students have an opportunity to explore relationships through readings in the popular press, but ultimately a scholarly, critical examination of the scientific literature serves as the foundation of our learning throughout the course. Students find that the literature contains unexpected findings that can change the way they look at relationships, both from academic and applied, real-life perspectives.

Prerequisites: PSYC S-1 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PSYC S-1507
Psychology of Diversity

Mona Sue Weissmark PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32397 | Section 1

Description
The United States is increasingly diverse and the world increasingly globalized. The central focus of the course is on the links between diversity and psychological processes at individual, interpersonal, and international levels. We consider several basic questions: What is diversity? How do race, nationality, and religion influence individuals? What impact does diversity have on cross-group relationships? How is diversity related to people’s perceptions of fairness and justice? What is the relevance of people’s perceptions of fairness and justice to social problems and social change? Does respect for diversity promote peace and positive change? Much research has addressed these questions, and we closely examine the evidence that has emerged so far.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1620
Brain and Behavior in the Extremes

Vladimir Ivkovic PhD, Instructor in Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35623 | Section 1

Description
What happens to the human brain and behavior when we are exposed to isolated, confined, and extreme environments? Examples include spaceflight; high altitude flights or mountaineering; submersed or underwater activities; and polar, desert, or jungle exploration. In addition to these classical extreme environments, the COVID-19 pandemic placed a large portion of the world’s population in an extreme environment defined by social and physical isolation and confinement, movement and travel restrictions, disruption of personal and professional activities, and novel health risks and behavioral adjustments. This course covers the effects of extreme environmental exposures on major physiologic systems and the resulting neurophysiologic and neurobehavioral performance and (re)adaptation. These topics are augmented by contemporary findings from research studies conducted in operational environments and discussed in the context of history, experimental methods, and research paradigms used in extreme environmental physiology and translational neuroscience. We also review current studies emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic and discuss them in the context of transition from every day to a new normal extreme environment, including physiologic, behavioral, and social adaptations. Theoretical concepts and research findings are evaluated relative to their utility in developing functional countermeasures for extreme human habitation as well as methods for clinical treatment of related medical conditions in the general population. As such, this course may be particularly interesting to students pursuing careers in translational neuroscience, psychology, extreme physiology/medicine, and human performance in extreme environments. This course features expert guest lecturers (for example, NASA astronauts and researchers, Antarctic expeditionary physicians, and underwater explorers) and demonstrations of unique experimental methodologies and equipment used in isolated, confined, and extreme environments.

Prerequisites: Students would benefit from completing introductory-level courses in psychology and human physiology prior to taking this course.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 19 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1810
Gender and Mental Health

Kelsey Quigley PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35653 | Section 1

Description
This course considers the complex questions that emerge where gender and mental health meet. We take an interdisciplinary approach to tackling these questions, drawing on empirical, conceptual, and clinical work in clinical psychology, philosophy, social theory, feminist and historical analyses of clinical science, and primary source historical documents. We begin by developing a foundational understanding of the constructs of gender and psychopathology (that is, psychological disorder). In the central part of the course, we examine their intersection, asking questions such as: how do gender-based inequities (for example, structural inequities, gender-based stress and trauma, and circumscription of behavior based on gender) contribute to psychopathology? Where have gender biases in assessment, diagnosis, or treatment caused harm? We end by seeking to understand what history can teach us about conducting clinical science in a patriarchal but post-binary world. We consider, for example, how historical treatment of women’s trauma informs the #MeToo movement and how clinical science and practice might adjust to better study and serve gender-expansive individuals.

Prerequisites: PSYC S-1 or the equivalent.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, Harvard Hall 104

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

PSYC S-1872
Power and Privilege in the Criminal Justice System

Lindsey Davis PhD, Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology, William James College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35153 | Section 1

Description
This course looks at a variety of intersections between psychology and the criminal justice system, with a particular eye on issues related to power and privilege. Students are introduced to the stages and processes of the criminal justice system and explore the psychosocial risk factors that contribute to engagement in juvenile delinquency and criminal behavior. The differential treatment of individuals at the various stages of criminal justice involvement is discussed, and pertinent case examples are explored through a social-cognitive lens. Students review key pieces of literature in the fields of juvenile justice, risk assessment, hate crime, law enforcement practices, and coercion of false confessions.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1877
The Psychology of Cults

Bethany Burum PhD, Associate of the Department of Psychology and Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35619 | Section 1

Description
In November of 1978, 909 members of The People’s Temple perished in Jonestown, Guyana after drinking Kool Aid laced with cyanide. Reverend Moon of the Unification Church convinced thousands of idealistic youth to work 20-hour days on starvation rations while he lived in mansions and amassed hundreds of millions of dollars. David Koresh of the Branch Davidians convinced his followers to annul their marriages and ultimately die in fire at the end of a 51-day standoff with the FBI. How do certain groups convince people to harm and even kill themselves and their children? This course explores the psychological mechanisms that enable cults to form and to take human belief and behavior to such extremes. What do cults share with other groups (mainstream religions, nations, and everyday social interactions), and what makes them stand apart? In what ways are cults an environment in which many of our psychological tendencies (toward ingroup conformity, heuristic decision making, and rationalization) are magnified? And what do cults reveal about the profound power of our social environment? We examine case studies through the lens of empirical psychological science to uncover how psychological research can shed light on cult behavior, and how cult behavior can shed light on our everyday psychology.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. This course is a Summer Seminar. Learn more about Summer Seminars on this page. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

PSYC S-1880
Introduction to Clinical Psychology

Cynthia A. Meyersburg PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33667 | Section 1

Description
Clinical psychology is a diverse and compelling field. Clinical psychologists research, assess, and treat mental illness. They work with people to help them adjust to challenges and heal after losses. They can develop and use empirically validated treatments to alleviate suffering and to improve functioning. They also can assess human abilities and personality traits. This course introduces students to clinical psychology, including topics such as the history of treatment, the role of science in clinical psychology, and the main paradigms that inform treatment and research. The course also explores some of the most common mental illnesses. We consider challenges and controversies in the field. In addition, we learn about preparing for graduate school in clinical psychology or related fields.

Prerequisites: Introduction to psychology or permission of the instructor.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 6:30pm-9:30pm, William James Hall 105
Friday, June 23, 6:30pm-9:30pm, William James Hall 105

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

RELI S-1508
Religion in American Media and Pop Culture

Christopher Glen White PhD, Professor of Religion, Vassar College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33870 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to religion, media, and American popular culture. It begins with an introductory unit on religion, spirituality, and new electronic media. The course then examines how religious ideas, practices, and communities are being reshaped by television, films, the internet, mobile devices, and popular culture. How are electronic media changing religious values and behaviors? How might we understand the relationship between American Christians and American popular culture? Have sports, television, or entertainment replaced older ways of being religious? Is our modern media environment hostile to faith, or is it religious or spiritual in wholly new and unexpected ways? We explore these questions and others through readings, films, videos, websites, and other forms of new media.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, 1 Story Street 304

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

RELI S-1510
Ballots and Bibles: Why and How Americans Bring Scriptures into Their Politics

David Holland PhD, John A. Bartlett Professor of New England Church History, Harvard Divinity School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34764 | Section 1

Description
In 2018, the US attorney general used a scriptural passage to defend tougher implementation of immigration laws. His reference bewildered observers who were unaware of a long tradition of citing Romans 13 in American political controversies and conflicts, including the American Revolution and the crisis over slavery. This course introduces students to a complex history of political invocations of scripture. Students engage thoughtfully with primary sources (campaign speeches, Congressional debates, civil rights slogans) and scholarly literature, such as the wealth of research on the history of biblical justifications for war, biblically inflected calls for social justice, and scripturally resonant theories of Constitutional interpretation. The objective of the course is to equip students to recognize the historical legacies that contemporary political conversations carry, to engage critically the modes of textual interpretation that inform political rhetoric, and to write cogently about the complex implications of political appeals to scriptural authority.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. This course counts for the Histories, Societies, Individuals Gen Ed requirement and is equivalent to Gen Ed 1062. It does not count for the College’s divisional distribution requirement.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 20 students

Syllabus

RELI S-1805
Islam: Fundamentals of Thought and Practice

Aaron Spevack PhD, Senior Research Associate and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, Brandeis University and Associate of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35654 | Section 1

Description
This course seeks to introduce students to the core beliefs and practices of Islam, with special focus on how Islam has manifested in diverse cultures throughout its vast history (China, Spain, the United States, and the Middle East). Students obtain a comprehensive literacy in the subject of Islam, enabling them to better interpret the various literary, cultural, artistic, religious, or political expressions of Islam in history and the modern world. Topics explored include theology, ritual, art, music, law, politics, and Sufism. Students have opportunities to relate course material to their own interests through research papers and presentations.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

RUSS S-Aab
Intensive Elementary Russian

Steven Clancy PhD, Senior Lecturer on Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30222 | Section 1

Description
This intensive course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Russian language and culture for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. Designed for students without any previous knowledge of Russian, the course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing). Students are introduced to Russian culture through readings, screenings, and class discussions. This course prepares students to continue in Russian at the intermediate level or for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 9:00am-12:00pm
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 1:00pm-2:45pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus

Stephen A. Mitchell PhD, Professor of Scandinavian and Folklore, Harvard University

Pernille Hermann PhD, Associate Professor in Scandinavian Studies, Aarhus University

SOCI S-11
Introduction to Sociology: Perspectives on Society and the Individual

Danilo Mandic PhD, Senior Associate Lecturer on Sociology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34720 | Section 1

Description
What is society? How can we understand it? What is the role of the individual in society, and how does society affect individual lives? This course introduces students to the field of sociology. By surveying social theory as well as empirical studies, students acquire what C. Wright Mills calls the “sociological imagination”: the ability to think beyond our personal lives and to connect the experiences of individuals with large social structures. The course introduces students to classical theoretical traditions of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Simmel, as well as their contemporary theoretical heirs. Readings include prominent empirical investigations into family dynamics, class inequalities, organizations, the nation-state, capitalism, democracy, and globalization. We examine common-sense assumptions about culture, politics, history, and psychology, and empower students to replace them with evidence-based reasoning. By emphasizing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills, this course helps students build the foundation for a deeper understanding of theory and methods in the social sciences. Students may not take both SOCI S-11 and SOCI E-10 for degree or certificate credit.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

SOCI S-124
Humanitarian Activism and Civil Society

Shai M. Dromi PhD, Associate Senior Lecturer on Sociology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35383 | Section 1

Description
When global crises strike, humanitarian nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) spring into action, offering emergency medical services, basic necessities, expertise, and innovation to affected communities around the world. COVID-19 has brought unprecedented challenges and unprecedented opportunities to humanitarian endeavors. This course provides a comprehensive view of humanitarian organizations and activism from a sociological perspective. We examine the origins of organized humanitarian activism and the dilemmas and challenges that NGOs face. We investigate the consequences, justifications, and limitations of humanitarian work. COVID-19 is a central case study for us and we also look at case studies from the Kosovo war, the Nigerian civil war, and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Students are assigned specific regions to research and create visual representations of the conditions and humanitarian activities in their assigned region. The course features guest speakers from major aid agencies and policy organizations.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

SOCI S-162
Sociology of Big Data: Algorithms, Robots, and Digital Societies

Alvaro Agustin Santana Acuna PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology, Whitman College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35386 | Section 1

Description
In recent decades, most societies around the world have experienced an explosion in the production, circulation, and consumption of data. This ongoing revolution, often associated with the rise of digital technologies and the term big data, is having unprecedented social, economic, and cultural consequences. This course explores some of these consequences by looking at technological tools and social groups that interact with such data, including algorithms, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, robots, cryptocurrencies, NFTs, the metaverse, social media, and digital influencers. Areas that are examined include the body, the environment, labor markets, the platform economy, social inequality and mobility, and political policies. Guest speakers (who are practitioners) discuss their professional experiences with big data. Students conclude this course with a better understanding of the current relationship between society and technology, and especially the social implications surrounding the use of big data.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 1 Story Street 302
Required sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

SOCI S-163
Ethnic Divisions and Segregation

Yuval Feinstein PhD, Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Haifa

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35545 | Section 1

Description
Ethnicity divides society into groups based on the belief that members of each group share a common origin and a unique culture. The course discusses the following questions in research on ethnic divisions: how are the boundaries that separate ethnic groups created, maintained, or changed? How do democratic regimes manage ethnic diversity and potential tensions between ethnic groups? What role do ethnic identities play in people’s everyday lives? And what motivates (some) ordinary people to participate in ethnic violence? When discussing these questions, we apply a comparative perspective, in which the United States is one of several focal cases.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, July 10-27, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Northwest Science Building B104

Term Start Date: July 10, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Syllabus

SOCI S-192
Globalization and Global Justice

Thomas Ponniah PhD, Affiliate of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University and Professor, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, George Brown College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32788 | Section 1

Description
This course provides an opportunity to discuss diverse theories of globalization and global justice via perspectives from sociology, economics, political science, anthropology, geography, history, and the emerging literature from civil society. The course considers research on issues such as democracy, trade, technology, poverty, ecology, culture, diversity, and the search for identity.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am, 1 Story Street 304

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: All students are required to attend and participate during the regularly scheduled class time, either by being present in the classroom or via web conference. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 40 students

Syllabus

SPAN S-27
Oral Expression: El español hablado

Adriana Gutierrez PhD, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 31128 | Section 1

Description
This is an intermediate language course designed for students familiar with Spanish grammar who need to improve their oral expression. It emphasizes consolidation and expansion of the skills of oral fluency, writing, and reading comprehension. In addition to focusing on spoken Spanish, the course uses short movies and readings to develop vocabulary and to practice discussing topics of interest in the Hispanic world. At the end of the course, students are expected to speak more accurately and fluently on topics that interest them; have a clearer idea of their strengths and difficulties in spoken Spanish; feel more comfortable using fundamental structures of Spanish grammar; and have a basic knowledge of some of the current cultural issues in the Hispanic world. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course Spanish 20.

Prerequisites: Three years of secondary school Spanish or three semesters of college-level Spanish.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, Harvard Hall 104

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

SPAN S-Aa
Beginning Spanish

Mauro Lazarovich MA, Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34909 | Section 1

Description
This course, conducted mostly in Spanish, is for students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish. It provides the linguistic, communicative, and cultural foundations to engage in basic daily life interactions in oral and written Spanish. Students gain an overview of the history of the Spanish language and the different ways it blends European and indigenous cultures in art, music, clothing, and family traditions. Through music, visual arts, videos, and short readings of authentic texts, students gain a new perspective of Spanish-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students have the linguistic elements to describe and narrate in the present, future, and past tenses, and engage in different types of basic interactions and conversations about everyday topics. They learn strategies to work through texts, unknown vocabulary, and grammar, and are able to identify informal from formal discourse and learn its importance in Spanish-speaking culture. Moreover, given the prominent place of technology in our lives, students also gain vocabulary for technology and learn what happens to English technical words when adopted or borrowed by the Spanish speaking world. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course Spanish 10.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-10:30am, Boylston Hall 104

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 14 students

Syllabus

SPAN S-Aa
Beginning Spanish

Adan Ramirez Figueroa MA, Doctoral Candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33551 | Section 2

Description
This course, conducted mostly in Spanish, is for students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish. It provides the linguistic, communicative, and cultural foundations to engage in basic daily life interactions in oral and written Spanish. Students gain an overview of the history of the Spanish language and the different ways it blends European and indigenous cultures in art, music, clothing, and family traditions. Through music, visual arts, videos, and short readings of authentic texts, students gain a new perspective of Spanish-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students have the linguistic elements to describe and narrate in the present, future, and past tenses, and engage in different types of basic interactions and conversations about everyday topics. They learn strategies to work through texts, unknown vocabulary, and grammar, and are able to identify informal from formal discourse and learn its importance in Spanish-speaking culture. Moreover, given the prominent place of technology in our lives, students also gain vocabulary for technology and learn what happens to English technical words when adopted or borrowed by the Spanish speaking world. Note: this course is the equivalent of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course Spanish 10.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-2:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 16 students

Syllabus

Johanna Damgaard Liander PhD, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

SPCH S-100
Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Jill A. Slye ALB, Associate in the MMSc in Dental Education Program, Harvard School of Dental Medicine

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34732 | Section 1

Description
This course covers the basic principles of public speaking. Students learn how to handle nerves, organize and deliver a formal presentation, and use verbal and non-verbal communication to connect with their audience. During class, students learn to use their own communication style while adapting their message for a variety of audiences. Students present several speeches in a safe and comfortable environment. Throughout the semester lectures focus on use of language, narratives, vocal variation, basic techniques for public speaking, and effective methods to overcome the fear of speaking in front of a large audience or small group of people.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, June 20-July 6, 8:30am-11:30am
Friday, June 23, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 25 students

Syllabus

SSCI S-100a
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Anthropology and Psychology

Simon Barak Caine PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35472 | Section 1

Description
This proseminar introduces students to basic behavioral science research methods in psychology. Students learn how to approach research papers and critically evaluate them; how to understand scholarly conversations of several articles with a common theme; and how to generate an idea for a potential contribution to an existing scholarly conversation. We begin with class protocol, definitions, and methods in general psychology. Topics to be explored include Ivan Pavlov’s classical conditioning, B. F. Skinner’s operant conditioning, Edward Thorndike’s law of effect, cognitive development in childhood (Jean Piaget and Walter Mischel), debates surrounding sleep and dreaming (Sigmund Freud versus J. Alan Hobson), and the longstanding debate over nature versus nurture (including the modern concept of epigenetics.) Students critique scholarly articles (one on synaesthesia and another on cannabis effects on cognition) and examine original scientific reports on addiction. We conclude with an integrative critique of several scientific reports followed by a proposal for an original contribution to an area of scientific debate. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate statistics and research methods courses are recommended, computer literacy (skills and experience with the internet, Word, and Excel) required. A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a grade of B or higher in the alternate expository writing course; an undergraduate statistics course and EXPO S-42b are strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students. Students with a specific interest in anthropology should consider taking the SSCI S-100a section taught by Dr. Martin.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

SSCI S-100a
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Anthropology and Psychology

Richard Joseph Martin PhD, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34247 | Section 2

Description
This proseminar introduces students to basic behavioral science research methods in anthropology and psychology. It teaches them how to read and evaluate research papers and translate their ideas into viable research projects. Topics include library and archival research, scholarly writing and argument, descriptive research methods, quasi-experimental and experimental design, ethical issues, and analytical methods. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate statistics and research methods courses are recommended, computer literacy (skills and experience with the internet, Word, and Excel) required. A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a grade of B or higher in the alternate expository writing course; an undergraduate statistics course and EXPO S-42b are strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

SSCI S-100a
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Anthropology and Psychology

Karyn Gunnet-Shoval PhD, Lecturer in Extension and Associate of the Department of Psychology, Harvard University and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35666 | Section 3

Description
This proseminar introduces students to basic behavioral science research methods in psychology and anthropology. It teaches them how to read and evaluate research papers and translate their ideas into viable research projects. Topics include library and archival research, scholarly writing and argumentation, descriptive research methods, quasi-experimental and experimental design, ethical issues, and analytical methods. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone. 

Prerequisites: Undergraduate statistics and research methods courses are recommended, computer literacy (skills and experience with the internet, Word, and Excel) required. A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a grade of B or higher in the alternate expository writing course; an undergraduate statistics course and EXPO S-42b are strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

SSCI S-100b
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Government, History, and International Relations

Asher Orkaby PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34234 | Section 1

Description
This proseminar addresses problems and methods related to the study of government, history, and international relations. It stresses the critical analysis of sources, constructing explanatory models, standards of logical demonstration, and organizing and presenting research results. Emphasis is on developing both writing and research skills. Students study essential categories of analysis used in history and political science. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42b is strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

SSCI S-100b
Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Government, History, and International Relations

Doug Bond PhD, Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 33943 | Section 2

Description
This proseminar addresses problems and methods related to the study of government, history, and international relations. It stresses the critical analysis of sources, constructing explanatory models, standards of logical demonstration, and organizing and presenting research results. Emphasis is on developing both writing and research skills. Students study essential categories of analysis used in history and political science. Because skills learned in this course are useful in subsequent courses, it is the first course that prospective Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) candidates should take toward the degree (or the second, if they are completing the expository writing prerequisite). While not designed to be a thesis or capstone proposal course, this course does serve as a foundation for eventual work on the thesis or capstone.

Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course. EXPO S-42b is strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

SSCI S-173
Self, Society, and Politics

Nicolas Prevelakis PhD, Associate Senior Lecturer on Social Studies, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35406 | Section 1

Description
This course examines the main ways in which the relationship between self, society, and politics has been conceptualized in major sociological and philosophical texts. What are the political implications of different ways of understanding the self? What are its effects on the economy, politics, or the environment? Is it fair to talk about a western individualistic tradition? And how do recent technological changes affect our understanding of who we are and how we interact? The course relies on readings of classical texts from sociology, anthropology, sociology, and history, as well as recent sociological scholarship.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

STAT S-100
Introduction to Statistics and Applied Data Analysis

Kevin A. Rader PhD, Senior Preceptor in Statistics, Harvard University

Julie Phuong Vu MS, Preceptor in Statistics, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32188 | Section 1

Description
This course is an intensive introduction to the fundamental concepts of probability, statistical inference, and statistical computing necessary for a working knowledge of applied statistics. The course moves at an accelerated pace and requires a substantial commitment in time and effort. The primary goal of this course is to prepare students for conducting research in an applied field, which requires being comfortable with the technical details of analysis, statistical computing, and the scientific process as a whole, from determining appropriate methods for addressing a research question to clearly communicating findings in the context of the question. The course explores applications within biostatistics, among other fields.Harvard Extension School students may count one of the following courses toward a degree or certificate, but not more than one: MGMT E-104, STAT S-100, STAT E-101 (offered previously), STAT E-102, or STAT E-104.

Prerequisites: Precalculus. Prior experience with R or other computing languages, as well as prior familiarity with statistical concepts, are not required but are helpful due to the fast pace of the course.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Open to admitted Secondary School Program students by petition. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 200 students

Syllabus

STAT S-103
Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Amy Tsurumi PhD, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34177 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics. Selected sections from textbooks and recent primary literature are used. Students learn how to critically read published epidemiological studies and understand the study design, analyses, and conclusions drawn from the studies. There is a substantial hands-on component in which students learn basic R statistical programming, using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dataset primarily, to make discoveries.

Prerequisites: Basic algebra skills are expected. Students are required to have access to a computer with R and RStudio installed. No prior experience in R is expected. We start the course by showing students how to install R and RStudio.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 6:30pm-9:30pm, One Brattle Square 204
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

STAT S-115
Data Science: An Artificial Ecosystem

Xiao-Li Meng PhD, Whipple V.N. Jones Professor of Statistics, Harvard University and Founding Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Data Science Review

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35611 | Section 1

Description
This course aims to introduce students to the world of the data science via articles published in the Harvard Data Science Review, a global forum disseminating everything data science and data science for everyone. The course emphasizes the evolutionary nature of the data science enterprise as an artificial ecosystem, where the phrase artificial shares a similar connotation as it is in the phrase artificial intelligence (AI). However, unlike the common algorithmic or robotic depictions of AI, this course espouses a panoramic view of data science, from philosophical conceptualization of data to interpretation and policy implications of statistical findings and to the after-life use of data for addressing scientific replicability and reliability. Topics such as data privacy and individualized treatments are explored in depth to demonstrate the necessity of the panoramic approach. Questions such as what privacy or individuality is cannot escape philosophical contemplation; how to measure privacy or individuality demands careful sociological, computational, and statistical thinking; and how to protect privacy or assess the effectiveness of individualized treatments requires advanced data science theory and methods.

Prerequisites: The course requirements weigh mostly on students’ ability to think critically and communicating effectively in the world of data science, not on their analytical ability or computational skills.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 45 students

Syllabus

STAT S-150
Intermediate Statistics: Methods and Modeling

Karyn Gunnet-Shoval PhD, Lecturer in Extension and Associate of the Department of Psychology, Harvard University and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34213 | Section 1

Description
This intermediate statistics course is intended to give students familiarity with statistical tools used to analyze data in a variety of disciplines, including psychology, and provides experience reading and understanding studies based on data analysis. The focus is on understanding underlying concepts rather than on memorizing mathematical formulas. The course covers linear regression, various types of analysis of variance (ANOVA), including factorial, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and repeated measures, as well as effect sizes and power analyses. These topics are explored using the statistical package R, with a focus on understanding how to interpret R output.

Prerequisites: STAT S-100, STAT E-101, STAT E-102, STAT E-104, or the equivalent; understanding of univariate statistics, correlation, univariate regression, t-tests, and one-way ANOVA is assumed.

Class Meetings:
Flexible Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Graduate credit $3,100.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students may attend at the scheduled meeting time or watch recorded sessions asynchronously. The recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Not open to Secondary School Program students.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 150 students

Syllabus

SWGS S-1242
Sex, Gender, and Sexuality

Jocelyn Viterna PhD, Professor of Sociology, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35601 | Section 1

Description
Male and female, masculine and feminine, and straight and gay. Where do these consequential categories come from? How do they generate inequalities? Why are they so easily reproduced? Why are they so frequently politicized? And what, if anything, should we do about it? Combining real-world applications with academic analyses, this course encourages students to think about how sexuality and gender shape the social world, as well as their place within it.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 1 Story Street 306
Optional sections to be arranged.

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Students can attend in person on campus, participate live online at the time the class meets via web conference, or watch the recorded video asynchronously. Recorded sessions are typically available within a few hours of the end of class and no later than the following business day. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

UKRN S-128
Ukraine in the World: Exploring Contemporary Ukraine

Emily Sarah Channell-Justice PhD, Lecturer on Social Studies and Program Director for the Temerty Contemporary Ukraine Program, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35376 | Section 1

Description
This course provides students with a framework for understanding Russia’s war in Ukraine, which began on February 24, 2022. Starting from the fall of the Soviet Union, the course delves into the relationship between Ukraine, Russia, and the west in order to understand the geopolitical situation that preceded war. It explores Soviet legacies in Ukraine on language, cultural practice, and ethnic and national identifications and considers the importance of mass protest and civic organizing in Ukraine’s political culture. The course further considers the role of information in the current war and provides students with tools for seeking out and verifying information in the fast-moving context of war.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 1 Story Street 303

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: All students are required to attend and participate during the regularly scheduled class time, either by being present in the classroom or via web conference. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. For more information about the Harvard Ukrainian Summer Institute (HUSI), see the HUSI website.

Syllabus

UKRN S-132
Tradition and Modernity in Ukraine, 19th and 20th Centuries

Sergiy Hennadiyouych Bilenky PhD, Research Associate, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34502 | Section 1

Description
The main focus of this course is on the cities and complex relations between tradition and modernity in Ukraine in a wider imperial and transnational context. The course introduces students to the most important social, political, and cultural issues facing modern Ukraine, from the imperial to Soviet and post-Soviet times, primarily in urban settings. We consider major cities such as Kyiv, Odessa, Lviv, Kharkiv, and Dnipro, as well as Jewish shtetls and monuments of Soviet industrial sublime, such as the Dnipro Hydroelectric Station. We explore such topics as the reactionary responses to modernity ranging from anti-semitism to religious conservatism; the central role of the city and urbanization; making and unmaking of nationalities; public hygiene and the limits of control; revolutionary culture and artistic avant-garde; the long-lasting effects of wars and extreme violence on society; the curse of resources; and the rise of mass culture and sport, among others. Students learn why studying Ukraine is essential for our understanding of the modern world.

Class Meetings:
Online or On Campus
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm, 1 Story Street 303

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: All students are required to attend and participate during the regularly scheduled class time, either by being present in the classroom or via web conference. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. For more information about the Harvard Ukrainian Summer Institute (HUSI), see the HUSI website.

Syllabus

UKRN S-G
Ukrainian for Reading Knowledge

Volodymyr Dibrova PhD, Preceptor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32718 | Section 1

Description
This course is designed primarily for graduate students of humanities who wish to acquire a reading knowledge of Ukrainian for research purposes. Texts from a variety of fields are used.

Prerequisites: Some previous background in Ukrainian, Russian, or other Slavic language.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, June 20-August 4, 10:00am-2:00pm, Lamont Library 230

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $7,200.

Credits: 8

Notes: Not open to Secondary School Program students. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information. For more information about the Harvard Ukrainian Summer Institute (HUSI), see the HUSI website.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus

VISU S-107
Scrutinizing the American Environment: The Art, Craft, and Serendipity of Acute Observation

John R. Stilgoe PhD, Robert and Lois Orchard Professor in the History of Landscape Development, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 32785 | Section 1

Description
A course in the making, perception, and future of the American environment, emphasizing contemporary views in advertising, news media, geography, and amateur and professional photography, all as related to ordinary Americans, especially farmers, the military, investors, urban and suburban residents, children, and above all, travelers. Topics range from streets, villages, railroads, shopping malls, and schools to backyards, energy-efficient site design, malls, urban neighborhoods, riverfronts, crossroads, and highways. The course emphasizes the big picture visual understanding of United States built form, the myriad ways individuals see differently and why, the way thoughtful observers find all sorts of secret knowledge, and why looking acutely often produces glimpses of the future of things and cultural shifts.

Class Meetings:
On campus only
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 3:15pm-6:15pm, Carpenter Center B04

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Syllabus

VISU S-14
Drawing and the Digital Age

Helen Miller MFA, Visiting Lecturer, Curator, Massachusetts College of Art and Design

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 34825 | Section 1

Description
Our world has been shaped by drawing: the buildings we work in, the films we enjoy, the dances we perform. As a contemporary tool, drawing can guide us more gracefully into the digital age by serving as a reference for software used in art, design, and other fields, such as computer-aided design (CAD) programs, the Adobe Creative Cloud, and numerous mobile applications. Much that we learn in drawing on paper about material and time, receptivity and rhythm, organization and composition is the analog, if not the source, for digital media. In this course, we develop our facility with drawing and digital media in tandem, leveraging life drawing in particular to embody seemingly abstract or disconnected aspects of the digital realm.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Tuesdays, Thursdays, June 20-August 4, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 15 students

Syllabus

VISU S-149
Introduction to Film

Jessica Rinland MFA, Associate of the Department of Art, Film, and Visual Studies, Harvard University and Teacher, El as Querejeta Zine Eskola

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 35588 | Section 1

Description
This course introduces students to the production and examination of film. The course is a primer to the technical and conceptual aspects of film production including its potential as a political and social tool, historical context, and technical and critical discourse. Students learn about image and sound creation, both technical and conceptual, while sparking curiosity and experimentation through various assignments. Through screenings, readings, in-class discussions, and critique, we explore the ongoing possibilities within filmmaking, as well as contemporary issues within the form, while developing individual skills. Practical knowledge is integrated through editing and sound workshops.

Class Meetings:
Live Attendance Web Conference
Mondays, Wednesdays, June 21-August 4, 8:30am-11:30am

Term Start Date: June 20, 2023

Tuition:
Noncredit, undergraduate, graduate credit $3,600.

Credits: 4

Notes: This course meets via web conference. Students must attend and participate at the scheduled meeting time. Harvard College students: This course is eligible for degree credit, but see important policy information.

Enrollment limit: Limited to 12 students

Syllabus

VISU S-160
Visual Trajectories: Forces Shaping Advertising, Landscape, and Popular Visual Imagery

John R. Stilgoe PhD, Robert and Lois Orchard Professor in the History of Landscape Development, Harvard University

Summer Term 2023 | CRN 30352 | Section 1

Description
This course emphasizes the chief forces now shaping the American understanding of everyday forms, such as the manipulation of aesthetic standards by advertising and Hollywood imagery; the perfection of powered flight and the aerial view; the importance of snapshot photography in relation to home video; the post-1960s fascination with outdoor privacy; contemporary and potential spatial disorientation resulting from computer-aided electronic media; the post-1920 retreat of well-educated people into wilderness; the shaping of gender roles and self-image through clothing design and fashion shifts; and